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4000 RPM curve limit


axiun
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Good question. This has been inquired about since Day 1 with D5 pumps among the most obvious victims. That was quite some time ago and since no change has been made, it seems like this is unlikely to added. I am not sure why this cannot be addressed with a software/firmware update.
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A D5 pump draws more power than the Commander Pro supply to the header. Each header apparently can only supply 1A. This might be a limitation of the trace width. I do run the D5 off a 3A header off my motherboard, though it is a vario (no PWM) manually set speed. Oddly enough if I use voltage control the pump is more audible than running it at full 12v.

 

I wonder what application he is using? Either he is going with some industrial 120mm, a really small fan, or lower powered pump that draws 1A or less. In general for RPM speeds, pumps don't make that much noise.

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Hmm... I don't know Corsair's reasoning, but Solarity is right about the current and you should be slightly cautious. My D5 is 23W (1.9A). I have not had any issues, but then I keep it at fairly moderate speeds in short, single component loop. I never run past 3000. I don't know the current max for your specific DDC model, but running two on the C-Pro might be asking for trouble. I wonder if you would be better off using a dedicated SATA powered PWM hub for just the two pumps. Edited by c-attack
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Correct me if I'm wrong but if a DCC PWM draws its power through the molex cable, only using the PWM fan cable to control the speed. The same should be true for the D5 PWM pump and as such, the 1A limit of the CPRO fan port isn't an issue.

 

I have used a CPRO port to control a D5 PWM in the past but I usually set a fixed percentage of around 40% duty cycle. These days I do the same using a PWM header on the motherboard. From what I've been able to glean from around the Internet, once you have sufficient flow/pump speed, ramping it up doesn't seem to make any tangible difference.

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Correct me if I'm wrong but if a DCC PWM draws its power through the molex cable, only using the PWM fan cable to control the speed. The same should be true for the D5 PWM pump and as such, the 1A limit of the CPRO fan port isn't an issue.

 

I have used a CPRO port to control a D5 PWM in the past but I usually set a fixed percentage of around 40% duty cycle. These days I do the same using a PWM header on the motherboard. From what I've been able to glean from around the Internet, once you have sufficient flow/pump speed, ramping it up doesn't seem to make any tangible difference.

 

 

Ugh... this is why I should never even turn the PC on before coffee is ready. Clearly you are correct and I left part of my brain elsewhere this morning.

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Speed control for pumps tends to be less of a concern as they are a lot quieter than fans. Most people go for a fixed flow rate. Having the speed to fast doesn't benefit, though having it to slow means worst temps. If controlling the pump via PWM you don't have to worry about current like you do with +12v as you are using Molex/Sata to supply the +12v. I can't say why they don't have a 4K range, maybe they don't think many people will go this route. It will be interesting to see what they do with hyrdoX: https://www.funkykit.com/news/pc-computers/corsair-hydro-x-custom-watercooling-lineup-leaked/

 

That looks like a D5 pump to me and I think the D5 is rated at 4800 RPM. I am going to look into this further.

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