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Why doesn't iCue have step up time?


Guitarmageddon
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So I took the plunge and got the commander pro, and it happens to be working just fine with my 6 noctua fans. Also have the h150i....but how come there is zero ability to set fan step up time? This is something bugged on asus boards which is a big part of the base of the users. Definitely seems like a simple feature to add. Am I just missing it?
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So I took the plunge and got the commander pro, and it happens to be working just fine with my 6 noctua fans. Also have the h150i....but how come there is zero ability to set fan step up time? This is something bugged on asus boards which is a big part of the base of the users. Definitely seems like a simple feature to add. Am I just missing it?

 

No, it's not there. And it's not necessarily simple if you want to do it correctly. Furthermore ... step up time (hysteresis) is really only necessary if you base your fan speeds on CPU temp. With iCUE, you have more (and better) options for fan control, particularly with the thermistors, that won't need hysteresis anyway.

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Do you mean besides coolant temperature (H150i Temp)? That is the obvious and appropriate one for the radiator fans. Also coolant temp isn't going to change by more than 1C in any 30 second window, so hysteresis becomes irrelevant and it will provide smooth and even control, exactly as you want on a radiator where reaction time is not very relevant.

 

For other case fans, there are quite a few options you can use in the drop down menu within the C-Pro Performance tab curve. However, the real trick is figuring out what to use for the non-standard 011. Presumably, you have the 360mm mounted in the mid-front, rotated to face toward the side glass (the showy position). What you are doing with the rest of the case fans may require more explanation. It's a bit of an odd case flow. You can set separate sources for all of them. If you have a 120mm on the little rear slot, that likely can run from GPU temp. Your best weapon in other places may be the 4 temp probes from the Commander Pro. That is a fan control source as well and might be useful for the any fans on the back side of the case. You also can use coolant temp for backside fans to match what the H150i fans do and keep the in/out flow even.

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Do you mean besides coolant temperature (H150i Temp)? That is the obvious and appropriate one for the radiator fans. Also coolant temp isn't going to change by more than 1C in any 30 second window, so hysteresis becomes irrelevant and it will provide smooth and even control, exactly as you want on a radiator where reaction time is not very relevant.

 

For other case fans, there are quite a few options you can use in the drop down menu within the C-Pro Performance tab curve. However, the real trick is figuring out what to use for the non-standard 011. Presumably, you have the 360mm mounted in the mid-front, rotated to face toward the side glass (the showy position). What you are doing with the rest of the case fans may require more explanation. It's a bit of an odd case flow. You can set separate sources for all of them. If you have a 120mm on the little rear slot, that likely can run from GPU temp. Your best weapon in other places may be the 4 temp probes from the Commander Pro. That is a fan control source as well and might be useful for the any fans on the back side of the case. You also can use coolant temp for backside fans to match what the H150i fans do and keep the in/out flow even.

 

Hmm.. Ive always been nervous about coolant temp because it seems to stay relatively low no matter what, even when the chip is baking. Thats why its always been on cpu temp for me.

 

So In my case, I have the the h150 on front intake, pull. Then I have two 140's on top in exhaust (gpu temp) maxing up to 1500 rpm, two 80s on the back exhaust (one gpu temp the other cpu) maxing at 1700rpm and 3 side 120's on the other side of the case in intake (gpu temp) maxing at 1500 rpm

 

I experimented with a h150 push config yesterday, but I found the cpu temp differences negligible, I heard more fan noise, and the gpu stayed much warmer at idle since the fans were not right up on it and now had the radiator in between to distrub the flow.

 

I have not messed with the temp probe yet, wasnt quite sure where I wanted to put them if I did in fact use.

 

Whats the easiest way I can data log to see cpu cores, cpu package, and liquid temp to graph out the relationship?

 

EDIT:

So here is an example. Towards the end of a blender run, cpu temps up to 70's ish... h150 temp not very high

https://i.imgur.com/pufdGo4.png

 

And after several minutes of sitting idle after the pass

https://i.imgur.com/ktllI42.png

 

So a 24.3 liquid temp at idle, versus a liquid temp of 25.7 under full load. Not a very big window to work with there....thoughts?

Edited by Technobeard
pics too big; changed to links
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You can log the readings - check my link to iCUE Tips & Tricks.

Also, take a look at the liquid cooler FAQ - the temps and control are explained there.

 

In a nutshell - spinning the fans on the radiator has no direct impact on CPU temps. The fans cool the liquid coolant, which then cools the CPU. So it's the coolant temp that you care about. And no, it doesn't rise or fall fast - this is due to the higher specific heat of liquid.

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Ok Im going to experiment with another test profile on the h150 then. But it seems odd to me that Ill be basing my fan curves off of tenths of a degree since theres literally a 1 degree swing between idle and full load?

 

1C is a bit low, especially since the sensor is in the pump chamber rather than post radiator after the heat is released. If it really is one degree after 5-10 minutes of load, you may not have good contact between the cold plate and CPU lid.

 

As mentioned above, blasting your fans will do nothing for the heat created between your CPU pins and the underside of the processor. You must conduct the heat through the CPU first and that rate is constant. The cooler (whether it is air or water) is the second stage of cooling and more properly described as waste heat transportation. It takes the heat conducted through the CPU and moves it somewhere else. Ultimately, if you do not get rid of the building waste heat, it will have a negative effect on CPU temps. The cold plate conducts heat both ways and your coolant temperature is the effective minimum CPU temp in a zero voltage situation.

 

You can find the relationship between your CPU voltage based heat and the coolant temp fairly easily. Load up any 100% non-dynamic stress test (Prime95, Linpack, etc). Note your coolant temp. Turn on the stressor. Note the CPU temp for the next 5 seconds. It should peak and drop a tiny amount before leveling. So if your coolant was 30C and your flatline max load CPU temp is 75C, then you have a coolant/CPU differential of 45C. Typically this value is directly related to voltage and your specific processor design. Regardless, you now can turn a coolant temp limit into a CPU temp limit and vice versa. That 45C max differential will hold for at those settings, so if you wanted to keep it under 80C, then you would set your max fan speeds at 35 (+45=80C). Most of the time you would be under that, but it is an effective way to put a value on either.

 

Also as mentioned above, fan speed affects coolant temperature only. So when you set the CPU load at 100%, fan speed makes no difference for that first minute when the system can easily vent that amount of heat. It is only over time that heat builds up in the cooler, increasing coolant temp, and it has a direct 1 to 1 knock on effect with CPU temp. +1C coolant rise equals +1C CPU temp rise. You can watch this in those steady 100% load CPU tests as the package temp climbs up +1C every minute or so, usually leveling off somewhere - I would guess about +4-5C for your set-up.

Edited by c-attack
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Could that Delta be so small because my downstairs area is quite cold most of the time (65 or maybe even lower)? I just checked to make sure and the cooler is seated quite firmly and securely. This is also a brand new replacement unit because the last h150i would click horrendously loud on quiet settings and it was super annoying that I couldn't use that if I desired. this is an RMA that is working just fine and I tend to keep the pump on balanced . I will try another test but do small ffts on prime for 15 minutes or so and let it really soak in and compare that to an idle reading. I'll post it in a bit
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Hmmm ... an an ambient temp that cold, you may be shedding heat as fast as its generated. Not necessarily a bad thing, you know. Even if you aren't, it does take time for the coolant to heat up.

 

As for case fans ... CPU temperature is absolutely meaningless to control case fans. Everybody defaults to that because it used to be all that we had and, in the days of all air cooling all the time, it did serve as a good indicator. But that doesn't mean that it's still appropriate. Stop and thing about what temps you want to manage. CPU? Sure ... but that's your AIO. What temps do you want to manage with your case fans? That's gonna be the internal case temperatures. You have a Commander Pro. It has thermistors for just this. Use them.

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Ok so let me correct myself now. I did a good idle reading compared to a 10 minute prime avx small fft run. The differential was 23.1 versus 27.9 at peak, so a 4.8 delta. Spot on with your mark.

 

So I have set my h150 fan curve as:

27 degrees: 100%

26 degrees: 80%

25 degrees: 50%

24 degrees: 30%

22 and below, 25%

does this seem sound?

oQHD8Gk.png

 

 

Idle:

9JBY2L9.png

 

And after 10 minutes prime soaking it in

https://i.imgur.com/TKo2sub.png

Edited by Technobeard
pic too big; changed to link
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You can probably be a little less aggressive with your fan curve. At some level, high temp readings on the CPU are also due to the insulation - oops, I mean TIM - that Intel uses for their CPUs. Delidding will make a pretty big difference.

 

You'll also want to revisit this in the summer time ... I'm assuming that the ambient would be warmer in summertime?

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Yes, loosen the curve up a bit. Maybe 35C at 100% and then a relatively linear path back down to slow idle. There are a few reasons for this. First, you don’t want the fans to run 300 rpm faster because the room is 1C warmer. Second, it wont matter anyway. Relax the fans by a few hundred rpm and watch the coolant go up... 0.5C? You should try and see. Remember your fans will only reduce coolant temp and if the delta is 5C, than there is not much to gain or loose. You can’t get to zero and it likely has a minimum of +3 even with 3000 rpm fans.

 

The other way to handle this is to make your curve for normal use. Relaxed, non-critical. Going to do a 25 min render? Click on the performance tab, select the custom curve, tick the fixed rpm circle set to 100%. Go make a sandwich. One click when finished puts it back on the adjustable curve.

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Ok good suggestion. Is there a way in icue to set a total system preset to change settings globally for different use cases? Like one click "now my cpro and h150 are in render mode" and one click "now I'm in browser mode". Or would I need to set "render mode" fan presets and apply to each fan as I need?
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Here's my curve.

 

The fans will go progressively from min to max RPM from 27 to 40c on the coolant.

 

It works pretty good and I don't need to run iCUE for that, I just sent the performance data to the AIO's memory and closed iCUE/Service.

 

Does the save to hardware thing also apply to the commander pro? if I didn't have to ever start icue unless I truly needed to modify something then that would be great. I've noticed that icue seems a little bit clunky like they've tried to make it too pretty. I also noticed that after I close it the mouse moves quite slowly as if it was still operating in a windowed gaming mode for example. It acts that way in the program and briefly after I close it.

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Not sure, I would assume so since is beefier than the LNP.

 

As for hardware driven RGB animations, you cannot send your full preset to the LNP, only simpler pre built animations and their speed.

 

In my particular case I settled for rainbow wave for everything BUT at the lowest speed looks better. The colors at that speed are spread longer across the LEDs and overal looks nice.

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Dang ok. I like using color for temperature so I'll have to see if it's able to write that to the h150 then

 

 

No, that won't work fro the H150i pump LED. Something software-wise has to be running to receive the temp data, then turn it into a specific color signal. It should not be there as an option under the hardware lighting.

 

You might be able to do this for the Commander Pro controlled RGB fans. With the software running (even in the background) you will be able to choose your temp source for the color gradient from all the normal C-Pro and motherboard hardware choices. To my surprise, Temperature is still listed as a choice in hardware lighting mode with full variable choices. This should not work, but... I have not tried it either. Perhaps I will momentarily.

 

*Temperature coloring will work if the source is one of the thermistor lines the C-Pro can read natively. Not surprisingly motherboard derived values like CPU or GPU temp will not and it defaults to a solid white instead. However, there seems to be more problems with the Pro series cooler LED, but there is a separate thread for this.

Edited by c-attack
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