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Node Pro Led PinOuts


KaspyX
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Can someone tell me the pinouts of the node pro, according to the image below?

 

vOE0SKqZQGm_ekEUMDLDoQ.png

 

I'm asking because I just ordered some WS2812B 1M 60LED 5V from the internet and I need to know if I need to change the wires if someone can help me would be great like numerate 1 is 5v, 2 is data... you guys got it.

 

My leds have the following sequence:

1. RED 5V

2. GREEN Data

3. WHITE Ground

ANjudDR3ShGlk40RJQ8K1Q.png

 

I think node pro it's like:

1. Ground

2. Data

3. 5V

But I'm not sure :S

 

Thanks!

Edited by KaspyX
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Take a look at the connector. The pin with the arrow is pin 1 and that's +5V. Pin 3 is ground. Pin 2 is data.

 

To which connector should I look? I know which one is 5v and data and ground on my led strip, I just don't know which pin is each in Node Pro, like which side is 5v and which one is ground?

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The Corsair strip connector ... I guess you don't have one? Unfortunately, I'm out of town for work so i can't just look on mine.

 

Yes, I don't have one, unfortunately, my LEDs are not from Corsair, that's why I need to know what each PIN in Node Pro is.

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Check out my video on plugging the RGB Hub up to the RGB header on the motherboard:

 

 

[ame]

[/ame]

 

Outer connect with key/cut out is power

Middle is Data

other outer connector is ground.

 

Don't mix them up. Also watch out for drawing to much current. The strips can vary.

 

While corsair strips aren't cheap the magnets make them easier to place. Plus their use of keyed connectors are many times pricier than standard type, though Corsairs are idiot proof.

Edited by solarity
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When I did it, I just took a cheap VTVM (volt meter) and figured out which pins were what that way. I have a Commander Pro and 2 Lighting Node Pros, and the pinouts are the same. They have to be for the Corsair LEDs to plug into either. I made adapter cables using JST SM 3-pin connector to bare end tails. You can buy these from Amazon for cheap. Take a look at this post and it should give you an idea of how I did it.

 

"The most annoying aspect of putting this together is the little 3-pin connectors that Corsair uses for their LED ports. The fan LED cables all plug into the LED Hub, which works fine. The not-Corsair LED strips plug directly into LED ports on the CLCP and the CLNPs. So where to get those little 3-Pin connectors? I happened to have 2 of the button controllers that come with the HD fans. These come with a 2-conductor cable that uses those little 3-pin Corsair LED connectors. Cutting that cable in half gets you 2 short cables with the required connector, but short 1 conductor. To get the 3rd conductor, I de-pinned one of the conductors from the 3-pin connectors on one of those cables and inserted the pins into the 3-pin connector from the other cable. That got me 2 cables that were 3-Pin Corsair LED connector to bare ends. I soldered those onto standard JST SM 3-pin connectors (which are what is used on the vast majority of open market LED strips). These custom cables were required to plug the non-Corsair LED strips into the LED ports on the CLCP and CLNPs."

 

http://forum.corsair.com/v3/showpost.php?p=936524&postcount=7

 

http://forum.corsair.com/v3/showthread.php?t=174049

 

Remember - Measure twice and solder once! Good luck !!

Edited by SpeedyV
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When I did it, I just took a cheap VTVM (volt meter) and figured out which pins were what that way. I have a Commander Pro and 2 Lighting Node Pros, and the pinouts are the same. They have to be for the Corsair LEDs to plug into either. I made adapter cables using JST SM 3-pin connector to bare end tails. You can buy these from Amazon for cheap. Take a look at this post and it should give you an idea of how I did it.

 

"The most annoying aspect of putting this together is the little 3-pin connectors that Corsair uses for their LED ports. The fan LED cables all plug into the LED Hub, which works fine. The not-Corsair LED strips plug directly into LED ports on the CLCP and the CLNPs. So where to get those little 3-Pin connectors? I happened to have 2 of the button controllers that come with the HD fans. These come with a 2-conductor cable that uses those little 3-pin Corsair LED connectors. Cutting that cable in half gets you 2 short cables with the required connector, but short 1 conductor. To get the 3rd conductor, I de-pinned one of the conductors from the 3-pin connectors on one of those cables and inserted the pins into the 3-pin connector from the other cable. That got me 2 cables that were 3-Pin Corsair LED connector to bare ends. I soldered those onto standard JST SM 3-pin connectors (which are what is used on the vast majority of open market LED strips). These custom cables were required to plug the non-Corsair LED strips into the LED ports on the CLCP and CLNPs."

 

http://forum.corsair.com/v3/showpost.php?p=936524&postcount=7

 

http://forum.corsair.com/v3/showthread.php?t=174049

 

Yeah, the connectors are about a buck a piece for the ones Corsair use, the 3pin JST with a 2.54mm pitch as you said are very inexpensive. Though the Corsair ones are idiot proof with the key and the latch keeps them from falling apart.

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Check out my video on plugging the RGB Hub up to the RGB header on the motherboard:

 

 

 

Outer connect with key/cut out is power

Middle is Data

other outer connector is ground.

 

Don't mix them up. Also watch out for drawing to much current. The strips can vary.

 

While corsair strips aren't cheap the magnets make them easier to place. Plus their use of keyed connectors are many times pricier than standard type, though Corsairs are idiot proof.

 

Thanks, your video shows perfectly the connections that you made, but I would like to connect it to Node Pro instead of the motherboard, but It helped me with the wires, now I know how can I get some connectors to plug into node pro.

 

When I did it, I just took a cheap VTVM (volt meter) and figured out which pins were what that way. I have a Commander Pro and 2 Lighting Node Pros, and the pinouts are the same. They have to be for the Corsair LEDs to plug into either. I made adapter cables using JST SM 3-pin connector to bare end tails. You can buy these from Amazon for cheap. Take a look at this post and it should give you an idea of how I did it.

 

"The most annoying aspect of putting this together is the little 3-pin connectors that Corsair uses for their LED ports. The fan LED cables all plug into the LED Hub, which works fine. The not-Corsair LED strips plug directly into LED ports on the CLCP and the CLNPs. So where to get those little 3-Pin connectors? I happened to have 2 of the button controllers that come with the HD fans. These come with a 2-conductor cable that uses those little 3-pin Corsair LED connectors. Cutting that cable in half gets you 2 short cables with the required connector, but short 1 conductor. To get the 3rd conductor, I de-pinned one of the conductors from the 3-pin connectors on one of those cables and inserted the pins into the 3-pin connector from the other cable. That got me 2 cables that were 3-Pin Corsair LED connector to bare ends. I soldered those onto standard JST SM 3-pin connectors (which are what is used on the vast majority of open market LED strips). These custom cables were required to plug the non-Corsair LED strips into the LED ports on the CLCP and CLNPs."

 

http://forum.corsair.com/v3/showpost.php?p=936524&postcount=7

 

http://forum.corsair.com/v3/showthread.php?t=174049

 

Remember - Measure twice and solder once! Good luck !!

 

Thanks for your reply, you answered to some questions that I didn't ask but was about to, such as where can I get Corsair connectors to plug into Node Pro, I just figured out in the video above that I can use some old connectors from old case front panel and plug them in directly to node pro, as you said I need to check which one is each.

 

I measured with a multimeter that's why I said at the end of my question

"I think node pro it's like:

1. Ground

2. Data

3. 5V"

 

I did measure with a multimeter :D Just want to make sure that I am correct ahah, I have node pro and led hub that came with my 3x pack LL120 fans at the moment I have the following configuration:

 

epk5AFK.png

 

Should I connect my LED strip to the GREEN LINE or to the BLUE LINE?? I think I should connect to the BLUE one because the Corsair LED Strips to come with the Node Pro and now with the LED HUB + I'm not sure if I LED HUB has DATA, Ground, 5V...

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Check in DevBikers Sig he has all the part numbers you need. The 2.54mm pitch is very common in PCs you can always buy a bunch of protoype pcb cables that are terminated already for cheap. I still a. learning too.

 

Also use the second LED port on the LNP. For safety use seperate power lines to your PSU to avoid any current concerns with your 5v.

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Check in DevBikers Sig he has all the part numbers you need. The 2.54mm pitch is very common in PCs you can always buy a bunch of protoype pcb cables that are terminated already for cheap. I still a. learning too.

 

Also use the second LED port on the LNP. For safety use seperate power lines to your PSU to avoid any current concerns with your 5v.

 

"Also use the second LED port on the LNP. For safety use seperate power lines to your PSU to avoid any current concerns with your 5v."

So I should use the blue line in the image, but the thing I don't get now is the "...For safety use seperate power lines to your PSU to avoid any current concerns with your 5v" what do you mean? I should not use the 5V that LNP have?

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Since you have a fan hub ... the wire that's missing from the NoPro/Fan Hub connection is the +5V line.

 

You can use the +5V line but be aware that SATA is limited to 4.5A and a single port isn't designed for more than about 2.2A max. If you try to push the full 4.5A through that, you may have issues.

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Since you have a fan hub ... the wire that's missing from the NoPro/Fan Hub connection is the +5V line.

 

You can use the +5V line but be aware that SATA is limited to 4.5A and a single port isn't designed for more than about 2.2A max. If you try to push the full 4.5A through that, you may have issues.

 

But if I connect it directly to the Node Pro it should be okay no? At least the Corsair Leds Strip come with one Node Pro, I should not have problems with the voltage right?

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Yes you can connect it to the 5VDC pin on the Node Pro. What they are saying is if you have a high density and/or very long LED strip (like I did), instead of connecting the 5VDC to the Node Pro 5VDC pin, you can instead connect the LED strip 5VDC directly to your system power supply +5VDC rail, which is available on a SATA output. I mentioned this in the post I linked to -

 

"One nice thing about making your own LED cables - you can wire it so the 5VDC comes directly from the system power supply (via a Molex adapter). That way, data comes from the Corsair LED controller, but the 5VDC power comes from the PSU. Ground is commoned between them. This way there is no concern about overloading the capacity of the CLCP or CLNP. "

 

As DevBiker mentioned, the Node Pro (or Co-Pro) LED ports can only source about 2.2 Amps. A SATA output on your power supply can supply a max of 4.5 Amps, so more than the Node-Pro but still limited. My after-market strip is very high density. The LEDs are almost touching each other. This makes soldering the wires onto the pads hard to do because the soldering iron is so close to the first LED that you can heat damage the LED. If this happens, that LED and all down stream from it may not work. I used a low power (12 watt) soldering iron with a tiny tip. You need to tin the pad and the wire, apply the heat, make the connection, and get the soldering iron off as fast as you can. Also, remember that these LED Strips have a polarity. Data only flows one way so make sure you do not solder the connector to the wrong end. There should be little arrows printed on the strip that shows the direction of current flow.

 

I don't run my 72-LED high density strip at full brightness due to current concerns. They are quite bright at 66% brightness, which is where I set mine. I think Link only allows 4 levels of brightness - 0, 33%, 66%, and 100%. I don't know about ICUE (never used it). More granular brightness control is one of the things I wish Corsair would improve for the Node-Pro and Co-Pro. That and higher maximum LEDs. I think the firmware limit is 96.

 

Be careful, and good luck!

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