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H80 watercooler (2010-2011)


dc8flyer
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When I first purchased my computer it was obvious the stock cooler needed to be replace. I replaced the stock cooler with the Corsair H80 some time in 2010 or 2011 and to date it has run flawlessly.

 

I don't OC or push the system too hard, although on occasion Tomb Raider likes to see what my system's got and it handles her just fine at near max settings.

 

 

After seven years or more I decided it might be time for a refresh concerning the H80 and re-pasting. The H80 still runs great and cools effectively and at first I just wanted to try and improve upon the H80. I tried the new Noctua NF-A12x25 FLX and found that the stock H80 fans out performed the Noctua by 2-4 degrees on all measurements and were only less noisy by a couple of deciles. The Corsair fans have a 7.7 SP compared to the Noctua's 2.34 SP.

 

 

Before replacing the stock Corsair fans I cleaned the radiator, which has always been kept clean with canned air, and was surprised how well the radiator was holding up. I'm not sure how much coolant has been lost through evaporation but I suspect little if any.

 

 

I've contemplated replacing my H80 with the H80i v2 and yesterday noticed the were on sale along with a 15 dollar refund certificate making the total price 65 US dollars so I ordered one. I chose the Thermal Grizzly Kryonaut Grease paste at a little over 10 dollars. I suspect there may be an updated H80 along the way with price clearances like this for an H80i v2.

 

I am also going to try the Noctua NF-F12 iPPC-3000 PWM fan since it has about 600 more RPM's available if needed.

 

I just wanted to share this with Corsair since their product has performed so well over eight years and is still running great.

Edited by dc8flyer
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The older coolers do really seem to last. I would only opt for for the 3000 rpm version if you intend to actually run at 2000+ rpm. The 3000 version has about double the minimum run speed of the 2000 rpm model, so it’s not quite compromise free. Also unlike the H80, the newer coolers all use PWM fan controllers, so make sure you pick up that version and not the 3 pin DC.
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The older coolers do really seem to last. I would only opt for for the 3000 rpm version if you intend to actually run at 2000+ rpm. The 3000 version has about double the minimum run speed of the 2000 rpm model, so it’s not quite compromise free. Also unlike the H80, the newer coolers all use PWM fan controllers, so make sure you pick up that version and not the 3 pin DC.

 

I had set the older H80 on the second level speed which has a max of 2000 rpm. If I set it to level three the fans would throttle too much so I never use the H80 to full capacity.

 

With the PWM fans I shouldn't have the throttling issues and I did select with the Noctua 3000 PWM rpm fans.

 

If you are referring to the minimum rpm speed for the Noctua 3000 fan I would suspect the minimum run (turn?) speed would be less than 1000 rpm, if that is what you are referring to.

 

Also the Noctua fan has what they call Focused Flow™. The corsair fan airflow seems to push outward away from the radiator whereas the Noctua fan pushes it straight out into the radiator.

Edited by dc8flyer
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To be honest I would go with a longer radiator i.e. 240mm, you can achieve cooler temps with less noise as you don't have to run your fans as fast. Faster fan speeds can only do so much, there is a point that the difference between the temp of the ambient air and the temp of the fins/water channels will be close enough that not much heat will transfer. The transfer of heat is proportional to the difference in temperature between the ambient air and the radiator's surfaces.

 

I took a look and that 3000RPM Noctua can do 750RPM on it's lowest speed +-20%, which seems like a bit of variance.

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If you are referring to the minimum rpm speed for the Noctua 3000 fan I would suspect the minimum run (turn?) speed would be less than 1000 rpm, if that is what you are referring to.

 

Yes, that is what I meant with the 3000 having a published minimum of 750 and the 2000 (400). For some people trying to set the quietest possible idle noise level is a high priority.

 

No issues with using these fans and I’ll leave the marketing alone. I have been using them since they launched. 3000 rpm is way past my usable maximum. When I had the H80i in the rear slot of a bank vault like case, I would top out at about 1900 push/pull. Besides the noise, gains in coolant temp become very elusive up there. There are some set ups where moving the maximum possible amount of air for exchange purposes is the goal, not cpu cooling per se. In those circumstances the higher speed may have some benefit, but very situational. I used the 3000 rpm version of the A14 at one point. Very quickly sold them on. The 2000 rpm versions of both the 120 and 140 still stay within easy reach. At the same speed, the 3k and 2k versions will offer the same airflow and pressure.

Edited by c-attack
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To be honest I would go with a longer radiator i.e. 240mm, you can achieve cooler temps with less noise as you don't have to run your fans as fast. Faster fan speeds can only do so much, there is a point that the difference between the temp of the ambient air and the temp of the fins/water channels will be close enough that not much heat will transfer. The transfer of heat is proportional to the difference in temperature between the ambient air and the radiator's surfaces.

 

I took a look and that 3000RPM Noctua can do 750RPM on it's lowest speed +-20%, which seems like a bit of variance.

 

 

My Aurora can only fit a 120mm radiator. I'm looking forward to seeing how snug the H80i v2 radiator will be as it is about .5 inches wider than the old H80 radiator. (38mm vs 49mm)

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It should. I had a Aurora (II) at one point and I would regularly use fan shrouds in addition the thick rad plus fans up to 38mm thick. I am also ok with running the 3000 rpm version for that case. I don’t know if I would like the noise, but that rear fan radiator combo does all the work for moving air. At higher speeds, it will suck cool air right through vented top to help with cpu and gpu waste heat. Much more effective that trying to only supply indirectly from the front.
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It should. I had a Aurora (II) at one point and I would regularly use fan shrouds in addition the thick rad plus fans up to 38mm thick. I am also ok with running the 3000 rpm version for that case. I don’t know if I would like the noise, but that rear fan radiator combo does all the work for moving air. At higher speeds, it will suck cool air right through vented top to help with cpu and gpu waste heat. Much more effective that trying to only supply indirectly from the front.

 

I'm using a push/pull into the case as the 980ti puts out a lot of heat that I don't want flowing into the radiator. I was hoping the extra airflow would help stream the hot air out the top.

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Sadly no, but from my testing back then it was better to draw in the cooler air. I distinctly remember trying to a paper airflow test one time and it sucked it right out of my hand and plastered it to the top of the case. It's a good amount of clean air. The 980 Ti is hot and there is nothing you can do about that. The rear location (yes, that is the only viable one without chassis customization) always will put you at a temperature disadvantage in combination CPU/GPU loads. Playing higher CPU usage games used make me run about 10-15C over Prime95 or similar CPU only benchmarks.

 

I tinkered with a lot of fan combinations, including dual 38mm fans on the 38mm radiator (overkill for sure). I think what you are doing is the best possible arrangement. Do you have the close-able "sliding vents" top or the standard perforated airflow holes?

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No movable vents, just the holes.

 

Use to have dual 5980’s and then dual 6950’s which both had closed cases and vented hot air out the back so I use to draw air out of the case. With the 980ti I reversed the flow and had better temps.

 

Of course I can take the side panel off and reduce 980 ti temps by 10 or more degrees C and the cpu as well.

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I did have some luck with reverse flow with pair of AMD 5000 that were part of custom loop. However, after moving to a 680, that did not work well at all for me. Definitely try both ways and see, although I am sure you already have and know the case well.
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