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iCUE 3.4.95 may cause BSOD on Windows 10


Sandokan71
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The only things I found on Windows Reliability monitor are a lot of faults related to:

 

C:\Program Files (x86)\Corsair\CORSAIR iCUE Software\Corsair.Service.exe

 

This not necessary cause a BSOD but maybe.

 

There is anyone with similar problem?

In any case, please, can you check on your Windows Reliability Monitor if you have similar issues?

 

Many thanks

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Can you provide some insight into the faults? You should have log entries for them.

 

Additionally, can you fill out your system details in "Edit System Specs"? It's extremely difficult for us to help you without that basic information.

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Only a few times i get faults with that service, but mostly when i quit iCUE. Never had a bsod. You can read out bsods with BlueScreenView from Nirsoft.

 

Yeah, these aren't BSODs but exceptions in the service. The service should auto-restart when this happens, btw.

 

I do think the title is a little over-the-top.

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Ye, most likely something else is doing that. Windows 10 dont like Generic old usb devices, or is sometimes sensitive for memory problems.

 

BlueScreenView will help him further with that.

 

If he dont have bsods, just ignore the faults your seeing in Windows Reliability Monitor. I rely more on Windows Log viewer than this monitor tool.

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Thanks for you answers. I used the term "may" in the title. Probably this is misleading. I wrote only to ask if there is anyone here with similar problems.

 

Maybe there is a different cause but the BSOD never appens on my PC in more than 2 years. BSOD occured only after iCUE installation.

I unistalled it and I will monitor what appens for some time.

Anyway the presence of a lot of errors related to a service it is not a good thing and you can't exclude that this can drive to a system hang or a BSOD.

 

The BSOD it is probably related to drivers: IRQL NOT LESS OR EQUAL ->ntoskrnl.exe

 

Anyway here my PC configuration:

 

OS: Windows 10 Pro 64bit 1803

Drivers: all drivers provided by Microsoft

 

Motherboard: Gygabyte Z170X Gaming 7

RAM: 2x8GB Corsair Vengance DDR4 3200

Processor: Core i7 6700k (no overclock)

Videocard: XFX Fury Liquid

SSD: ADATA SX8200 480Gbyte M.2 NVME + 2x Samsung EVO 860

Keyboard: Corsair K95 RGB

Mouse: Corsair M65 RGB

 

Thanks

Edited by Sandokan71
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A BSOD is an error, essentially, at the hardware level. It is an exception with code running at Ring 0 - priveleged execution with direct access to hardware. Most code, including most services, runs in Ring 3 - the is protected mode and there is no direct access to hardware. Most BSODs are actually caused by drivers failing though it can be caused by hardware level issues as well (e.g. a component failing).

 

Regarding your BSOD ... correlation is not necessarily causation. You'd need to dig into the minidump to see what the cause of the BSOD actually is.

 

Windows is also a preemptive multitasking operating system. "Preemptive" means that the system can preempt any running thread; no single application, except the operating system, can actually take over the system. Components may hang (for example, mouse input) but the entire system hanging is usually an indication of something going wrong at a different level.

 

Drivers can cause both types of errors. Very few applications, even services, actually can. A Win32 service is, after all, simply an application that is started at system boot and runs (typically) without a user desktop context (even if it has a user token for permissions).

 

As a member of the community beta team, I've been running iCue since before it was released to the public. There certainly have been issues and they are working on the stability of the service; there's no question about that. But claiming that application errors in the service would cause a blue screen is an example of Chicken Little thinking.

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A BSOD is an error, essentially, at the hardware level. It is an exception with code running at Ring 0 - priveleged execution with direct access to hardware. Most code, including most services, runs in Ring 3 - the is protected mode and there is no direct access to hardware. Most BSODs are actually caused by drivers failing though it can be caused by hardware level issues as well (e.g. a component failing).

 

Regarding your BSOD ... correlation is not necessarily causation. You'd need to dig into the minidump to see what the cause of the BSOD actually is.

 

Windows is also a preemptive multitasking operating system. "Preemptive" means that the system can preempt any running thread; no single application, except the operating system, can actually take over the system. Components may hang (for example, mouse input) but the entire system hanging is usually an indication of something going wrong at a different level.

 

Drivers can cause both types of errors. Very few applications, even services, actually can. A Win32 service is, after all, simply an application that is started at system boot and runs (typically) without a user desktop context (even if it has a user token for permissions).

 

As a member of the community beta team, I've been running iCue since before it was released to the public. There certainly have been issues and they are working on the stability of the service; there's no question about that. But claiming that application errors in the service would cause a blue screen is an example of Chicken Little thinking.

 

I have applied the Occam's razor priciple to solve the issue. I have uninstalled iCUE and there are no more BSODs. I don't have any HW fault or driver issues a part Corsair iCUE/drivers stuff.

So I have solved my issue and I can confirm 100% that in my specific case the BSODs are related with some iCUE bug/incompatibility.

I will install old CUE software and I will give a try with future iCUE software releases.

 

Thanks everyboby for the help.

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Four months with iCue and no BSODs.

I will also continue to monitor my system stability. :cool:

 

This is probably a benefit to be a beta tester. I found your answer unusefull. Anyway I understand that you are a Corsair supporter and your opinion it is biased.

Good for you. ;):

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If the BSOD is reporting an error of IRQL NOT LESS OR EQUAL ->ntoskrnl.exe

 

Then it's not a problem with CUE but with Windows. Id suggests a repair of a clean install of windows.

 

Thanks, probably you have right. May be that the faults are caused by other components but I think that this actually do not solve my issue. Now my PC works ok.

As I wrote my PC starts immediatly and frequently to BSODs after iCUE setup e stop to BSODs suddenly after iCUE uninstall. May be it is a Windows issue or maybe it is a fault caused by other drivers or software but there are not doubts that this faults are related to iCUE interactions.

 

I think but I can't confirm that iCUE setup install some drivers for keyboard, mouse and other things to read data for system monitoring (to show temps etc.). I do not know how it works and if there are some interaction with my specific system (HW, OS, drivers and other software) that can drive to a fault. Probably there are different software, drivers on the system that interacts one with each other.

 

Anyway at the moment I can survive without iCUE and I will wait that some iCUE, Windows or drivers update will solve the problem in future.

 

Thanks

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This is probably a benefit to be a beta tester. I found your answer unusefull. Anyway I understand that you are a Corsair supporter and your opinion it is biased.

Good for you. ;):

 

As a beta tester, I get the same builds as everyone else, just earlier. And we occasionally get builds that don't go out due to stability.

 

So ... if anything, I should get more BSODs than you do. I don't.

 

My point here is that it's likely not iCue but something in your system. And as a counterpoint to your over-the-top and alarmist thread title.

 

Corsair supporter? Sure. Biased? Perhaps. If there's a problem in iCue, would I deny it? Not a chance. I'd try to find workarounds to mitigate it. And try to help users resolve issues. But you'll notice that I will say - clearly and openly - when there are known issues.

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There are other peoples with a really similar situation here:

 

 

 

This user have also my same Corsair Keyboard and Mouse. [edit] there are also other peoples with other Corsair devices

Edited by Sandokan71
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There are other peoples with a really similar situation here:

 

 

 

This user have also my same Corsair Keyboard and Mouse. [edit] there are also other peoples with other Corsair devices

 

That not the same situation. They have specific CPUs paired with ASUS. And they arent BSOD the system just hangs then crashes.

 

Also, windows update won't fix a bug with the OS unless that specific file gets patched.

Edited by Inheritance
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That not the same situation. They have specific CPUs paired with ASUS. And they arent BSOD the system just hangs then crashes.

 

There are different people with different CPUs and MBs. Also BSODs or not it is unrelevant, iCUE seems to crash PCs.

 

Also, windows update won't fix a bug with the OS unless that specific file gets patched.

 

It seems obvious to me. Anyway I bet on a iCUE bug and I am confident that a future release will solve the problem.

 

Many thanks.

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  • 7 months later...
https://pastebin.com/gmaND4ue

iCUE.exe is listed on the process name. Oddly enough, the BSOD itself said something about Ntfs.sys, nothing about iCue. And last time, it was another error code entirely. (Kernel Security Check Error the last few times) I'm really confused. Even though iCue is listed in the minidump, I'm not sure if it's related.

 

So ... the thing about BSOD's is that they are Ring 0 errors. That is, they are hardware level. It is always caused by something that directly interacts with hardware at the lowest level - a driver, typically. Applications run in User Mode (Ring 3) and don't have direct access to any hardware of the machine. (User Account Control also makes more difficult - an app has to ask permission before doing something like this.

 

If there is a hardware error (or a driver error), sooner or later an app will trigger it. Not because the app is accessing the hardware ... but is using the higher-level Windows user APIs to tell the driver to access the hardware on its behalf. The crash dump may point to the app that happens to be the unlucky one but that doens't mean that the application itself caused it.

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this happened to my gf's pc, she built it perfectly...worked fine..updated and rando bsod's- resetting ram to not OC value and power cycling fixed it, although, now it randomly turns on, then off, then on when starting up...thats not icue probably tho haha
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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi Guys, I have a configuration with K95 Keyboard and Corsair Glaive RGB Mouse, and PC configured as you see in the signature, since I installed the latest version of iCue (3.13.94 02/25/2019) the PC goes into blue screen corrupting the boot. and must necessarily eliminate the driver and make a return to a restore point.

 

Any advice on how to solve the problem?

Edited by flea86
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I'm here to support DevBiker's wisdom. App-level code CANNOT crash an NT-based OS. Such a crash requires a hardware issue, or a driver-level issue. Now, it is possible for an app to install a driver, which if it has a defect or conflict, may cause a BSOD. Does iCUE install drivers? That's a question I can't answer.
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Source

Corsair.Service

 

Summary

Stopped working

 

Date

‎03/‎13/‎19 9:27 PM

 

Status

Report sent

 

Description

Faulting Application Path: D:\Corsair\CORSAIR iCUE Software\Corsair.Service.exe

 

Problem signature

Problem Event Name: CLR20r3

Problem Signature 01: Corsair.Service.exe

Problem Signature 02: 3.13.0.11

Problem Signature 03: 5c52e5e1

Problem Signature 04: System.Management

Problem Signature 05: 4.7.3190.0

Problem Signature 06: 5b6947cb

Problem Signature 07: 8a

Problem Signature 08: 51

Problem Signature 09: PSZQOADHX1U5ZAHBHOHGHLDGIY4QIXHX

OS Version: 10.0.17763.2.0.0.768.101

Locale ID: 1033

Additional Information 1: 2beb

Additional Information 2: 2beba6fb4680d73a8c78ca7c24ccdb46

Additional Information 3: 900a

Additional Information 4: 900ace4b71a5dd638cea219188cb9500

 

Extra information about the problem

Bucket ID: e9766d44275eea45f07c79dfa4df20ca (1187958403169722570)

 

Configured not to launch during boot, & not opened during use since discovered. Does this help? I also have the XML file.

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That's not a blue screen, that's an app crash. Different beastie. And this is a crash in System.Management.dll, which is the .NET assembly to support WMI. Sadly, this is too common because ... well ... WMI is the spawn of Satan himself.
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  • 1 month later...

I seem to be getting BSOD from iCue. It started when I got these Corsair fans and installed iCue. I have reinstalled Windows a few times now (formatting the drive and downloading/installing iCue each time). Seems to be caused by iCue, although I cannot 100% guarantee it. Current version is 3.14.104 and when I leave my computer for say a few hours, it is ALWAYS on the lock screen/no apps running (event viewer shows it restarted due to a critical error).

 

Let me know what info, if anything, you would like to help troubleshoot this.

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