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Capacity of ports on AX760


Lady Fitzgerald
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Hello Lady Fitzgerald,

 

The 6 pin connections are strictly meant for peripheral connections such as SATA or Molex. They would supply 3.3v, 5v, and 12v power. What you are trying to power?

 

Items that use 3.3v, 5v, and 12v power with SATA or "Molex" power connections. I want to power a homemade SATA power strip I can plug 5.25" devices, such as up to 13 SSDs and one or two ODDs, into the power strip with short jumpers instead of having to run multiple cables to the PSU.

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Items that use 3.3v, 5v, and 12v power with SATA or "Molex" power connections. I want to power a homemade SATA power strip I can plug 5.25" devices, such as up to 13 SSDs and one or two ODDs, into the power strip with short jumpers instead of having to run multiple cables to the PSU.

 

Come on, guys. Surely someone can answer this.

 

Additional information: I'm confident a 25A rail can handle the power I need for my peripheral devices but I seriously doubt one socket can handle that much current, which is why I have asked how much current a 6 pin socket on the AX760 can handle. I can easily make a cable that can handle the current I need but, assuming each socket is unable to handle what I need (such as being rated for only 15A, for example), could I run two sockets in parallel to get the current capacity I need?

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You surely can understand why people might be reluctant to give a ringing endorsement to a homemade project and without wiring diagrams. Typically the 6 pin peripheral cable is rated at 75W (6.25A). So, I agree you would be pushing your luck with one. Newer SSDs can be really low at under 2W, but a midrange product from 2-3 years ago is probably closer to 5-6W. 13 including 2 hungrier HDDs will require some safe totalling. You would think two would suffice. Certainly you can run two cables to combine the power allowance, but then it comes down to your wiring — something most of us can’t help you with unless we have been down this road with a similar project.
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Sigh. Let me simplify this for you all. Forget what I'm planning on doing. Just answer one or both of these simple questions:

 

1. What is the rating of the overcurrent protection of each of the six pin sockets on the AX760 PSU (not the rating of the socket itself or the entire rail)? Does that protection rating apply to each voltage separately or combined?

 

2. Can two six pin sockets on the PSU be connected in parallel to one cable without shorting anything out or damaging the PSU?

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1. Just answered that.

 

2. Just answered that too. Yes, you can connect two to something, but whether or not it works or is safe will depend on your end.

 

1. No, you didn't. You gave me the typical rating of a cable, not the actual rating of the overcurrent protection on this specific PSU.

 

2. Your answer didn't really address my question and I don't know how to simplify the question any further.

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1. No, you didn't. You gave me the typical rating of a cable, not the actual rating of the overcurrent protection on this specific PSU.

 

Yes, I did deliberately give you the cable rating. Anyone can find the current limits for the PSU rail in 60 seconds of searching. That raises the question of why you didn’t. Either you knew what you were doing and just needed a pat on the back or your intent was the use the PSU in a way not intended, specifically with what you are doing with the wires/cables. I wasn’t sure and needed to tease it out. I hope you do know what you’re doing, but it is unrealistic to expect someone to blindly answer “Sure, that’s no problem. Jam as many homemade wires as you like into your mystery circuit.” If you really want help, you need to be more specific, not more simple. Either way, you might be asking in the wrong place. You can’t possibly expect someone from Corsair to stick their neck out blindly. You might find more tailored helpi in a forum with a little more DYI spirit, less restrictions, and a higher concentration of electrical engineers.

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Yes, I did deliberately give you the cable rating. Anyone can find the current limits for the PSU rail in 60 seconds of searching. That raises the question of why you didn’t. Either you knew what you were doing and just needed a pat on the back or your intent was the use the PSU in a way not intended, specifically with what you are doing with the wires/cables. I wasn’t sure and needed to tease it out. I hope you do know what you’re doing, but it is unrealistic to expect someone to blindly answer “Sure, that’s no problem. Jam as many homemade wires as you like into your mystery circuit.” If you really want help, you need to be more specific, not more simple. Either way, you might be asking in the wrong place. You can’t possibly expect someone from Corsair to stick their neck out blindly. You might find more tailored helpi in a forum with a little more DYI spirit, less restrictions, and a higher concentration of electrical engineers.

 

c-attack is right. Unfortunately, if it's outside it's intended use, we're unable to assist.

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Yes, I did deliberately give you the cable rating. Anyone can find the current limits for the PSU rail in 60 seconds of searching. That raises the question of why you didn’t. Either you knew what you were doing and just needed a pat on the back or your intent was the use the PSU in a way not intended, specifically with what you are doing with the wires/cables. I wasn’t sure and needed to tease it out. I hope you do know what you’re doing, but it is unrealistic to expect someone to blindly answer “Sure, that’s no problem. Jam as many homemade wires as you like into your mystery circuit.” If you really want help, you need to be more specific, not more simple. Either way, you might be asking in the wrong place. You can’t possibly expect someone from Corsair to stick their neck out blindly. You might find more tailored helpi in a forum with a little more DYI spirit, less restrictions, and a higher concentration of electrical engineers.

 

I'm NOT asking about the bloody rails! Those ratings are right on the PSU, for crying out loud. Each socket on the PSU has their own separate overcurrent protection. It's like each socket has it's own little circuit breaker on it. The protection for each socket is there to protect it from the entire capacity of the rail going through that one little socket. You wouldn't want to be able draw 63A @12v through one little pair of pins (+ and GND), would you?

 

Again all I want to know is how many amps is each 6 pin socket's "circuit breaker" rated for and is that rating for each voltage or for all of them combined? What on earth is so difficult about that to understand?

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Again all I want to know is how many amps is each 6 pin socket's "circuit breaker" rated for and is that rating for each voltage or for all of them combined? What on earth is so difficult about that to understand?

 

Indeed. Right on the side. 25A/25A/63A. Large current limits. But how will you route the power from the socket to your circuit and devices? Now we are back to the current capacity of the standardized cable. The cable is the limiting factor. You missed the point straight from the start.

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Indeed. Right on the side. 25A/25A/63A. Large current limits. But how will you route the power from the socket to your circuit and devices? Now we are back to the current capacity of the standardized cable. The cable is the limiting factor. You missed the point straight from the start.

 

Why can't I get a straight answer? I feel like I'm talking to an Amazon bot. Forget the blasted cable and answer the bloody question I asked, which is what is the OCP (Over-Current Protection) at each socket?

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If you're in single-rail mode, there is no per-socket OCP, just the overall 63A (presumably) OCP of the single +12V rail. If you're in multiple-rail mode, the per-socket OCP rating seems to be something that Corsair is not publishing. An independent hardware test/review of the AX760 may give you that information, but for whatever reason Corsair has not published it in the PSU manual or specs.
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Actually, I see now that the AX760 does not support multiple rail operation, so that part of my previous post doesn't apply.

 

To answer the OP's original question, there is no per-socket OCP on the AX760. Like most single rail designs, it relies on the judgement of the system builder and the limited current carrying capacity of the cables to keep from drawing too many amps out of a single socket. Which is essentially what c-attack has been saying all along.

 

Yes, you can increase your wire current capacity by connecting the ports in parallel as long as you match the individual voltage rails. They are all connected together behind the socket wall, so it won't hurt to reconnect them in front of it.

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Actually, I see now that the AX760 does not support multiple rail operation, so that part of my previous post doesn't apply.

 

To answer the OP's original question, there is no per-socket OCP on the AX760. Like most single rail designs, it relies on the judgement of the system builder and the limited current carrying capacity of the cables to keep from drawing too many amps out of a single socket. Which is essentially what c-attack has been saying all along.

 

Yes, you can increase your wire current capacity by connecting the ports in parallel as long as you match the individual voltage rails. They are all connected together behind the socket wall, so it won't hurt to reconnect them in front of it.

 

Thank you very much! Making sure a cable can handle the current without excessive voltage drop is easy (bigger wires, such as #14). After all, the original wires going to each pin are only #18. Btw, the load plays the major role in determining how much current is drawn through a cable. The size of the size of the wires determine how much current can be safely passed through the cable and the size and length of the wires determine voltage drop.

Edited by Lady Fitzgerald
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Btw, the load plays the major role in determining how much current is drawn through a cable. The size of the size of the wires determine how much current can be safely passed through the cable and the size and length of the wires determine voltage drop.

 

Yes, I'm aware that load is the primary determinant of current draw ;-)

 

I should have worded my original statement better. To wit: "Like most single rail designs, it relies on the judgement of the system builder and his or her knowledge of cabling current limits and estimated device current usage to keep from drawing too many amps out of a single socket."

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