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H150i pro and case fans connections


Hawk1234
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Hello guys,

I just got my new PC and I'm trying to make some changes at the fans connections, hope you can help because I'm really don't understand some things.

CPU - I7 8700k

Motherboard - asus z370 maximum x hero

Cooling - h150I pro with 3 ML 120 pro

Case - nzxt rog noctis 450 with included fan hub

Memory - corsair dominator platinum 4x8 32gb 3333mhz with corsair airflow cooling

The radiator at front with the 3 fans, and there is 3 120 ml pro fans at the top of the case.

 

My goal is that the 3 radiator fans will be controlled with the pump at the corsair link, and the 3 top case fans will act like one unit, that when I change one of them, they all follow his rpm, and according nzxt, that how their fun hub works.

So the h150I connected to the sata, USB, the 3 fans connected to the 3 y splitter that come out from the pump, and the only female pwm connection from the pump connected to the 'Aio pump' at the mb.

The fun hub have one sata connection, and the pwm cable connected to the 'CPU Fan'.

In the fan hub you have one 4 pins connection, and six more of 3 pins, so I connected all the 3 top case fan to him, 1 to the 4 pin, and the two else to the 3 pins.

My corsair airflow connected to the 'W pump +' wich can provide max 3A and 36W and I think that he runs at full speed.

Is all those connections are right ? Cause at the uefi q fan control I only see ' CPU fan' at 600rpm , 'aio Pump' at 2200rpm and that's it. All the other fans at the q fan is 'N/A'..

hope you can help here

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The fans connected to the H150i pump splitter are being handled by the cooler's fan controller. Those will only show in the Link/iCUE software. They do not have a direct motherboard connection. You are seeing the pump speed and the NZXT fan hub speed.

 

To do what you want (6 synchronized fans), you probably need to do one of two things:

 

1) Get a Corsair Commander Pro. It will also give you desktop fan control of 6 fans. Actually, 9 in this case because the radiator x 3 can stay on the pump controller and all fans can be set to follow coolant temp or one of many other variables. The NZXT hub no longer has a use and you can change fan speeds on the fly from the desktop, no BIOS tinkering.

 

2) Get $7 10K thermistor and connect it to the input location on the Hero X. Tape the sensor end to the back side of the radiator on the front intake. This will give you the effective coolant temperature, but it will be readable by the motherboard and is a control variable on the Hero X. Then in the BIOS, set the remaining case fans to run on a similar curve to what you program for the H150i in Link/iCUE. Not quite as elegant as solution 1, but I ran this way for quite a while and it is effective and the values consistent and reliable.

Edited by c-attack
*Noticed ML Pro, not ML-RGB
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The fans connected to the H150i pump splitter are being handled by the cooler's fan controller. Those will only show in the Link/iCUE software. They do not have a direct motherboard connection. You are seeing the pump speed and the NZXT fan hub speed.

 

To do what you want (6 synchronized fans), you probably need to do one of two things:

 

1) Get a Corsair Commander Pro. It will also give you desktop fan control of 6 fans. Actually, 9 in this case because the radiator x 3 can stay on the pump controller and all fans can be set to follow coolant temp or one of many other variables. The NZXT hub no longer has a use and you can change fan speeds on the fly from the desktop, no BIOS tinkering.

 

2) Get $7 10K thermistor and connect it to the input location on the Hero X. Tape the sensor end to the back side of the radiator on the front intake. This will give you the effective coolant temperature, but it will be readable by the motherboard and is a control variable on the Hero X. Then in the BIOS, set the remaining case fans to run on a similar curve to what you program for the H150i in Link/iCUE. Not quite as elegant as solution 1, but I ran this way for quite a while and it is effective and the values consistent and reliable.

 

Thank you for the reply,

I'm not planning buy anything else.. what I have is OK for me. The radio and the fans on it will be controlled by the link, that's great.

Only wish to be able control the hub like its supposed to be controlled - as one unit.

I plugged the pwm cable of the hub to the 'CPU fan' and it says 600 rpm, but as I can see physically, one of the 3 is being spinning at that speed, but the other 2 looks like they are spinning on full speed.. why is that ?

The fan hub has 1 pwm 4 pins connection, and all the rest fans are 3 pins, and I connected 3 pwm fans with 4 pins, so there is some problem connecting 4 pins fan to a 3 pins ? Or it's about the hub connected to the 'CPU fan' ?

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No, that is how a splitter works. On a 3 way PWM splitter, 1 connector has 4 pins, the other two have 3. Those two have their speed pin removed so there is only one control signal for all 3 fans. It should be impossible for the fans to be at different speeds. Make sure the connections are secure. Also try switching the 4 pin connector to a different fan up top.

 

There might be one negative aspect to using the fan hub on cpu fan. That binds the fan speed to cpu temp and on a 8700k you are going to see some pretty dynamic cpu temps. The fan delays in the Advanced BIOS may help, but ultimately you may want a different header and control variable. Still, it should not cause the fans to run at max.

 

If you are trying to rule out the fans, you can connect them directly to cpu/opt and then use a standard splitter one one or the other. I am not really sure what this NZXT hub gets you, if you are not trying to sync 6 fans from one control source. Plenty of headers on your board. I don’t see an advantage to using it.

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No, that is how a splitter works. On a 3 way PWM splitter, 1 connector has 4 pins, the other two have 3. Those two have their speed pin removed so there is only one control signal for all 3 fans. It should be impossible for the fans to be at different speeds. Make sure the connections are secure. Also try switching the 4 pin connector to a different fan up top.

 

There might be one negative aspect to using the fan hub on cpu fan. That binds the fan speed to cpu temp and on a 8700k you are going to see some pretty dynamic cpu temps. The fan delays in the Advanced BIOS may help, but ultimately you may want a different header and control variable. Still, it should not cause the fans to run at max.

 

If you are trying to rule out the fans, you can connect them directly to cpu/opt and then use a standard splitter one one or the other. I am not really sure what this NZXT hub gets you, if you are not trying to sync 6 fans from one control source. Plenty of headers on your board. I don’t see an advantage to using it.

 

Like you said on the splitter, that's exactly what I want - to control only on one fan (the one who connected to the 4 pin) and the other 2 will follow his speed. That's also what nzxt explained to me. But I'm not seen this, cause one at low rpm and 2 are at full.

Cause I don't want to connect each of them to a pwm connection on the motherboard and control the individually.. I want all of them to act together.

Or, it can make them follow the CPU temperature ? It's also an idea cause my gpu is water cooled and he's not affecting too much on the temps there..

 

I don't understand what you said about blinding the CPU.. cause I have the link controlled the CPU, I will set it smart the if the temps will raise, the rpm will raise too, so what's the problem ?

And what's that delay you're talking about ?

 

By the way, I have the CPU opt empty if that's help on something..

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You could make them follow the CPU temperature but that's actually not of much use. It's not really a good control value in a water cooled system. Your Maximus X should have several motherboard sensors that you can use if you don't want to get the temp sensor.

 

The radiator should be connected to the CPU_FAN header. The fan connection on that cooler exists only to provide an RPM signal to the CPU_FAN header. This will also give you warning if the pump fails. The AIO_PUMP header is of no use to you in the default configuration; if you enable Q-Fan control on it, then it'll be an ordinary chassis fan header. And fan headers without any fan (or, more accurately, any RPM signal) will show as N/A.

 

You should also be able to connect that hub to any of the motherboard fan hubs. I wouldn't connect it to CPU_OPT, however. This will be slaved to the CPU temperature and the CPU header. You'll actually have less control of the fans than if you simply connected to a chassis fan header. In all honesty, you could do just as well with a 3 way splitter cable rather than a full-on hub. But since you have the hub ...

 

As for why the hub's not working properly ... that's hard to say. If you rearrange the fans, is the same fan always operating at the proper speed? Or is it the same connection that's always operating at the proper speed?

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Also try switching the 4 pin connector to a different fan up top.

 

As for why the hub's not working properly ... that's hard to say. If you rearrange the fans, is the same fan always operating at the proper speed? Or is it the same connection that's always operating at the proper speed?

 

Please try the above. Swap the 4 pin connector to a different fan. It is the most common glitch with these things.

 

 

The "fan hub" is nothing more than a powered splitter. Normal splitters are passive and you are limited to the current max on the source header, usually 1.0A. That means 2 or 3 fans at most. The SATA power line lets you take on more fans, usually up to 4.5A or so. Not really needed in this case, but...

 

The control source is still wherever you connect the hub's 4 pin lead, in this case to CPU_Fan. On Asus boards, that means you the fans will run in accordance with CPU temperature (as measured by the board) and there is no option to change it. While hidden in the basic BIOS Q-fan layout, hitting F7 on that screen will take you to the Advanced BIOS. From there, tab across to the Monitor section, then slide down to Q-Fan control again. Here the fan controls are shown in text format, rather than the graphic. You can enter specific control points, but you can also set a period of hysteresis or "delay" before the fan reacts to any change in the control variable. For CHA fans, this goes in large increments (0,12,25,50, etc) and 12 seconds is perfect for most things. However, CPU fan and it's copycat OPT must run from CPU temp and have very short delays (2-8 seconds). These headers were designed to control an air cooler and its 1-2 fans. This isn't overly useful for much else and this is why it is often suggested to put the cooler's motherboard lead on CPU fan. It gets disabled or set to 100% and the control scheme doesn't matter. Your AIO and W_PUMP headers can be reconfigured to act like a normal CHAssis fan header. They have no special properties of their own.

 

It's rather difficult for us to do voltage testing and assess the functionality of your NZXT fan hub from this end. It is easier to demonstrate the fans are working properly. If swapping the fan connections around on the hub does not work, try connecting 2 of them to CPU and OPT individually and see if they behave normally. OPT has no controls and will do exactly what CPU fan is set to do. If the fans all work normally on the two motherboard headers, then you know there is an issue with the fan hub.

 

You also might want to make sure you don't have something crazy set in the BIOS for CPU fan. I can't remember what it defaults to, but it is probably "Turbo" and that could give you rather racy fans in combination with the very temperature dynamic 8700K.

 

**EDIT - One of the more simple possibilities is the auto-detect sensor on the Asus is having trouble reading the fan hub. Make sure CPU fan is manually set to PWM in Q-Fan. This is not the behavior I would expect, but it is still a basic troubleshooting step.

Edited by c-attack
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You could make them follow the CPU temperature but that's actually not of much use. It's not really a good control value in a water cooled system. Your Maximus X should have several motherboard sensors that you can use if you don't want to get the temp sensor.

 

The radiator should be connected to the CPU_FAN header. The fan connection on that cooler exists only to provide an RPM signal to the CPU_FAN header. This will also give you warning if the pump fails. The AIO_PUMP header is of no use to you in the default configuration; if you enable Q-Fan control on it, then it'll be an ordinary chassis fan header. And fan headers without any fan (or, more accurately, any RPM signal) will show as N/A.

 

You should also be able to connect that hub to any of the motherboard fan hubs. I wouldn't connect it to CPU_OPT, however. This will be slaved to the CPU temperature and the CPU header. You'll actually have less control of the fans than if you simply connected to a chassis fan header. In all honesty, you could do just as well with a 3 way splitter cable rather than a full-on hub. But since you have the hub ...

 

As for why the hub's not working properly ... that's hard to say. If you rearrange the fans, is the same fan always operating at the proper speed? Or is it the same connection that's always operating at the proper speed?

 

Please try the above. Swap the 4 pin connector to a different fan. It is the most common glitch with these things.

 

 

The "fan hub" is nothing more than a powered splitter. Normal splitters are passive and you are limited to the current max on the source header, usually 1.0A. That means 2 or 3 fans at most. The SATA power line lets you take on more fans, usually up to 4.5A or so. Not really needed in this case, but...

 

The control source is still wherever you connect the hub's 4 pin lead, in this case to CPU_Fan. On Asus boards, that means you the fans will run in accordance with CPU temperature (as measured by the board) and there is no option to change it. While hidden in the basic BIOS Q-fan layout, hitting F7 on that screen will take you to the Advanced BIOS. From there, tab across to the Monitor section, then slide down to Q-Fan control again. Here the fan controls are shown in text format, rather than the graphic. You can enter specific control points, but you can also set a period of hysteresis or "delay" before the fan reacts to any change in the control variable. For CHA fans, this goes in large increments (0,12,25,50, etc) and 12 seconds is perfect for most things. However, CPU fan and it's copycat OPT must run from CPU temp and have very short delays (2-8 seconds). These headers were designed to control an air cooler and its 1-2 fans. This isn't overly useful for much else and this is why it is often suggested to put the cooler's motherboard lead on CPU fan. It gets disabled or set to 100% and the control scheme doesn't matter. Your AIO and W_PUMP headers can be reconfigured to act like a normal CHAssis fan header. They have no special properties of their own.

 

It's rather difficult for us to do voltage testing and assess the functionality of your NZXT fan hub from this end. It is easier to demonstrate the fans are working properly. If swapping the fan connections around on the hub does not work, try connecting 2 of them to CPU and OPT individually and see if they behave normally. OPT has no controls and will do exactly what CPU fan is set to do. If the fans all work normally on the two motherboard headers, then you know there is an issue with the fan hub.

 

You also might want to make sure you don't have something crazy set in the BIOS for CPU fan. I can't remember what it defaults to, but it is probably "Turbo" and that could give you rather racy fans in combination with the very temperature dynamic 8700K.

 

**EDIT - One of the more simple possibilities is the auto-detect sensor on the Asus is having trouble reading the fan hub. Make sure CPU fan is manually set to PWM in Q-Fan. This is not the behavior I would expect, but it is still a basic troubleshooting step.

 

OK, so How do I set the 3 fans to follow the sensors ? And where the sensors are located ? Sound enough good to me that those 3 top fans will raise according my mb heat sources.

 

About the h150i, if I will connect the pwm cable to the CPU fan I will achieve a fail warning if something will happen to the pump and uts great, but I still will be able to control the pump through the Link ? And do I need to change the CPU fan though the q fan on 'PWM' and then control it through the link ?

And some side question - I see a lot of people say that the pump should work on 100% cause the water flow and some other reasons.. but it will short the item life time and make some noise.. what do you suggest ?

 

About the fan running low, I will check it at home and tell you.

 

You could make them follow the CPU temperature but that's actually not of much use. It's not really a good control value in a water cooled system. Your Maximus X should have several motherboard sensors that you can use if you don't want to get the temp sensor.

 

The radiator should be connected to the CPU_FAN header. The fan connection on that cooler exists only to provide an RPM signal to the CPU_FAN header. This will also give you warning if the pump fails. The AIO_PUMP header is of no use to you in the default configuration; if you enable Q-Fan control on it, then it'll be an ordinary chassis fan header. And fan headers without any fan (or, more accurately, any RPM signal) will show as N/A.

 

You should also be able to connect that hub to any of the motherboard fan hubs. I wouldn't connect it to CPU_OPT, however. This will be slaved to the CPU temperature and the CPU header. You'll actually have less control of the fans than if you simply connected to a chassis fan header. In all honesty, you could do just as well with a 3 way splitter cable rather than a full-on hub. But since you have the hub ...

 

As for why the hub's not working properly ... that's hard to say. If you rearrange the fans, is the same fan always operating at the proper speed? Or is it the same connection that's always operating at the proper speed?

 

Please try the above. Swap the 4 pin connector to a different fan. It is the most common glitch with these things.

 

 

The "fan hub" is nothing more than a powered splitter. Normal splitters are passive and you are limited to the current max on the source header, usually 1.0A. That means 2 or 3 fans at most. The SATA power line lets you take on more fans, usually up to 4.5A or so. Not really needed in this case, but...

 

The control source is still wherever you connect the hub's 4 pin lead, in this case to CPU_Fan. On Asus boards, that means you the fans will run in accordance with CPU temperature (as measured by the board) and there is no option to change it. While hidden in the basic BIOS Q-fan layout, hitting F7 on that screen will take you to the Advanced BIOS. From there, tab across to the Monitor section, then slide down to Q-Fan control again. Here the fan controls are shown in text format, rather than the graphic. You can enter specific control points, but you can also set a period of hysteresis or "delay" before the fan reacts to any change in the control variable. For CHA fans, this goes in large increments (0,12,25,50, etc) and 12 seconds is perfect for most things. However, CPU fan and it's copycat OPT must run from CPU temp and have very short delays (2-8 seconds). These headers were designed to control an air cooler and its 1-2 fans. This isn't overly useful for much else and this is why it is often suggested to put the cooler's motherboard lead on CPU fan. It gets disabled or set to 100% and the control scheme doesn't matter. Your AIO and W_PUMP headers can be reconfigured to act like a normal CHAssis fan header. They have no special properties of their own.

 

It's rather difficult for us to do voltage testing and assess the functionality of your NZXT fan hub from this end. It is easier to demonstrate the fans are working properly. If swapping the fan connections around on the hub does not work, try connecting 2 of them to CPU and OPT individually and see if they behave normally. OPT has no controls and will do exactly what CPU fan is set to do. If the fans all work normally on the two motherboard headers, then you know there is an issue with the fan hub.

 

You also might want to make sure you don't have something crazy set in the BIOS for CPU fan. I can't remember what it defaults to, but it is probably "Turbo" and that could give you rather racy fans in combination with the very temperature dynamic 8700K.

 

**EDIT - One of the more simple possibilities is the auto-detect sensor on the Asus is having trouble reading the fan hub. Make sure CPU fan is manually set to PWM in Q-Fan. This is not the behavior I would expect, but it is still a basic troubleshooting step.

 

About the CPU delay, I still don't get what I or someone else will achieve by delay the fan action by a couple of seconds..

I will do the testing on the fans connection and will inform you, also about the CPU q fan section.

By the way, honestly, I can just put all the fans in q fan to 'PWM' ? Or there is something I am missing that can do some trouble reading or some collision with the link for example ?

 

By the way, I got some advice to connect the pwm of the hub to the 'H Amp' that can provide 3A/36W and can be controlled by the q fan not like the 'W pump+' that has the same spec but running on 100%..

Edited by Hawk1234
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OK, we are getting a bit spread out across different issues here. Presumably step 1 should be to determine if there is something wrong with the fan hub or any of the fans. The easiest way to do that is connect two of them at a time to CPU and OPT and see if they behave normally.

 

Why would any one want a 'fan delay' on their control source? Because without it you will get to listen to those top fans go 600-1400-800-600-1300, etc. every single second as your CPU temp ping pongs all over the place. Listening to your fans take off like an airplane every time you open a browser window is genuinely dissatisfying and utterly worthless as far as cooling goes. In a case where both your GPU and CPU are watercooled, all you need is slow and steady. You do not need any of your fans to react to CPU temperature. It would be nothing but an annoyance with no productive value. Ultimately, that would be the reason to move the top fans to a CHA or AIO fan header and stick the H150i on CPU fan. CPU/OPT isn't useful for much besides a dual fan air tower. If you move the fan hub's motherboard lead to a CHA fan, you will have other control sources to choose from, including the thermistor sensor. For your set-up, that is both the most efficient and most logical choice. I have been running a similar system for some time. It would be tedious without this little $7 wire.

 

High Amp header - Yes, it can take more current, however on your NZXT hub you have 0 current on that line so it's wasted on the H-AMP header. All the power comes from the SATA line and not the board itself. I would put the GPU pump, H150i, or just about anything else there with a positive current draw. Additionally, on a lot of Asus boards the H-AMP header does a full power on with boot/wake. That means the top fans will go 2400 rpm for a brief second. Minor annoyance, but a lot of people really dislike this. A pump or something else set to a fixed speed won't be affected.

 

Pump Speeds - Two things to keep clear with this. At the BIOS level, always set the fan header to 100% (Full Speed in Q-Fan) or 'disabled'. You change the pump speed from within the Link/iCUE application. Do not do this by cutting voltage through the BIOS. That will shorten the pump life. As for the desired speed on the desktop, it really is user choice, but I will offer this suggestion. Set it to balanced (~2100 rpm) and leave it there. Virtually no one with less than 12-16 cores is going to see any cooling difference at the Extreme speed setting. Flow restriction is not typically a limiting factor on short AIO coolers. You definitely will hear the pump at 3000. Most people cannot hear it at 2100. So same performance, less noise. If you have a really quiet room or the case is very close, you can experiment with using the Quiet pump mode (~1100 rpm) while working on the desktop, browsing, etc. However, there is a performance deficit for actual work conditions and you will need to remember to manually change it back and forth. For most people, this is hardly worth the trouble. As for pump longevity vs operational speed, there is no specific data to indicate people running the higher speeds wear the pump out faster that those using medium or low. The overwhelming majority of people who come to the forum with cooler issues have problems that do not relate to a mechanical failing. Most are of another nature and even the pump ones tend to be electrical rather than mechanical. I'm a rationalist, so all that aside, I am not going to use a faster pump speed than needed if has no benefit. You can test once your all set up, but I would be utterly stunned if you see any cooling benefit for your hardware at the highest speed. Set to balanced and leave it.

 

W_PUMP - This one varies a bit from board to board. Some boards will let you turn this back into a normal functioning CHA header. Others have it locked at 100%. You can use this for the GPU or CPU pump, but generally you need something on CPU fan to prevent the boot error. Might as well use it for one of the other. I have not played around with the new RGB DRAM fans, so I don't know if they are fan speed adjustable or run fixed.

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With the H150i, the fan header only provides the tach signal. It's not used for control or anything else. Control for the H150i is solely controlled through Link. Period. On some of the previous generation coolers (like the H80i V2), the fan header also provided power. For these coolers, it's critical that the pump header that it's connected to supplies the full 12V, as c-attack mentioned. But it's irrelevant with the H150 as you have a dedicated SATA power connection.

 

Part of the confusion, I think, is the AIO header. Let's be clear: it's just a standard fan header with no control functionality. It's for those AIOs that don't control the fans and the fans are controlled by the motherboard fan headers. That said, you can enable Q-Fan Control on that header and then ... it's just a standard chassis fan header.

Edited by DevBiker
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OK, we are getting a bit spread out across different issues here. Presumably step 1 should be to determine if there is something wrong with the fan hub or any of the fans. The easiest way to do that is connect two of them at a time to CPU and OPT and see if they behave normally.

 

Why would any one want a 'fan delay' on their control source? Because without it you will get to listen to those top fans go 600-1400-800-600-1300, etc. every single second as your CPU temp ping pongs all over the place. Listening to your fans take off like an airplane every time you open a browser window is genuinely dissatisfying and utterly worthless as far as cooling goes. In a case where both your GPU and CPU are watercooled, all you need is slow and steady. You do not need any of your fans to react to CPU temperature. It would be nothing but an annoyance with no productive value. Ultimately, that would be the reason to move the top fans to a CHA or AIO fan header and stick the H150i on CPU fan. CPU/OPT isn't useful for much besides a dual fan air tower. If you move the fan hub's motherboard lead to a CHA fan, you will have other control sources to choose from, including the thermistor sensor. For your set-up, that is both the most efficient and most logical choice. I have been running a similar system for some time. It would be tedious without this little $7 wire.

 

High Amp header - Yes, it can take more current, however on your NZXT hub you have 0 current on that line so it's wasted on the H-AMP header. All the power comes from the SATA line and not the board itself. I would put the GPU pump, H150i, or just about anything else there with a positive current draw. Additionally, on a lot of Asus boards the H-AMP header does a full power on with boot/wake. That means the top fans will go 2400 rpm for a brief second. Minor annoyance, but a lot of people really dislike this. A pump or something else set to a fixed speed won't be affected.

 

Pump Speeds - Two things to keep clear with this. At the BIOS level, always set the fan header to 100% (Full Speed in Q-Fan) or 'disabled'. You change the pump speed from within the Link/iCUE application. Do not do this by cutting voltage through the BIOS. That will shorten the pump life. As for the desired speed on the desktop, it really is user choice, but I will offer this suggestion. Set it to balanced (~2100 rpm) and leave it there. Virtually no one with less than 12-16 cores is going to see any cooling difference at the Extreme speed setting. Flow restriction is not typically a limiting factor on short AIO coolers. You definitely will hear the pump at 3000. Most people cannot hear it at 2100. So same performance, less noise. If you have a really quiet room or the case is very close, you can experiment with using the Quiet pump mode (~1100 rpm) while working on the desktop, browsing, etc. However, there is a performance deficit for actual work conditions and you will need to remember to manually change it back and forth. For most people, this is hardly worth the trouble. As for pump longevity vs operational speed, there is no specific data to indicate people running the higher speeds wear the pump out faster that those using medium or low. The overwhelming majority of people who come to the forum with cooler issues have problems that do not relate to a mechanical failing. Most are of another nature and even the pump ones tend to be electrical rather than mechanical. I'm a rationalist, so all that aside, I am not going to use a faster pump speed than needed if has no benefit. You can test once your all set up, but I would be utterly stunned if you see any cooling benefit for your hardware at the highest speed. Set to balanced and leave it.

 

W_PUMP - This one varies a bit from board to board. Some boards will let you turn this back into a normal functioning CHA header. Others have it locked at 100%. You can use this for the GPU or CPU pump, but generally you need something on CPU fan to prevent the boot error. Might as well use it for one of the other. I have not played around with the new RGB DRAM fans, so I don't know if they are fan speed adjustable or run fixed.

 

With the H150i, the fan header only provides the tach signal. It's not used for control or anything else. Control for the H150i is solely controlled through Link. Period. On some of the previous generation coolers (like the H80i V2), the fan header also provided power. For these coolers, it's critical that the pump header that it's connected to supplies the full 12V, as c-attack mentioned. But it's irrelevant with the H150 as you have a dedicated SATA power connection.

 

Part of the confusion, I think, is the AIO header. Let's be clear: it's just a standard fan header with no control functionality. It's for those AIOs that don't control the fans and the fans are controlled by the motherboard fan headers. That said, you can enable Q-Fan Control on that header and then ... it's just a standard chassis fan header.

 

 

OK let's do some order haha

 

Step 1 : check the top fans at CPU and opt when I get home, if they are fine try change the the fan who connected to the 4 pin, and play with that until they all work together. After that connect the hub pwm to CHA or Aio on the motherboard and check everything is controlled and same speed as it should be.

Question on step 1 - the hub pwm cable is already organized to reach the 3 connections - CPU,opt and aio on top the board, so I prefer connect it to the aio, so how I'm define the aio to work at pwm like normal pwm fan and how I'm define the aio connection to work according the sensors on the motherboard ?

 

Step 2 : connect the pump pwm cable to the CPU fan

Question on step 2 - how to put the CPU fan on 100% or 'disabled' so that it will be controlled through the Link and I won't cut the voltages of the pump from the bios ?

 

Side questions :

1. What are those sensors on the motherboard ? They're built in ? How can I see their temps and where they are located ?

2. I have the 1080ti waterforce edition with built in water cooling, and it's radiator/fun don't have a fan connection, how it's possible ? Where it controlled from ?

3. I have 4 corsair ram that have xmp profile to 3333mhz and I'm gonna take it to 3600 cause corsair have another same memory kit with the same spec like cl and voltage and has 3600, so I will do it alone. I got with the kit a corsair dominate airflow rgb that runs on 4000+- rpm cause it connected to the w pump +, my question is if it rather to keep it on 100% all the time or connect it the a chasis fan and control it (if it's possible) ?

4. I got a fan holder that I can attach 50x50 fan to the motherboard upon on the vrm, useless or helpful ?

5. There is more useful options or components on this amazing motherboard that may I don't know ? If you know some nice things I will be glad to hear, never use this kind of high end hardware before so I'm just try to catch up

Edited by Hawk1234
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Step 1 & 2 are conveniently right next to each other - Restart and mash delete to get into the BIOS. You likely default to the 'EZ BIOS'. Press F7 once there to change to the Advanced BIOS that looks like a bunch of text columns.

 

- Use the arrow keys to move over to the 'Monitor' Tab.

- Scroll all the way to very bottom past all the temp readings. Down there is Q-Fan.

- Should be a short list of things and this is a manual, non-picture interface. Two to three lines down will be CPU Fan. It probably shows PWM. Select that line and a drop down will appear. Select 'disabled'. This does not disable the power, only the control and locks you at 100%. You can do the same thing from EZ BIOS by selecting 'Full Speed'. However, we have more thing to do right here.

 

-At the bottom of this Q-Fan page is the AIO/W_Pump header control. It should be set to a default "disabled", again meaning 100% all the time. If you hit Enter on that word, you will again get the drop down and can select DC (3 pin) or PWM (4 pin). Upon doing that, you will get three lines to enter temperature points, fan speeds, and Control Source (yeah). Also, the previously mentioned fan delays are here. +12 sec will do for any case fan. Depending on source, you may not need it, but definitely for CPU temp. (I can't be 100% sure my Code is the same as the Hero. The Code/Formula have a few more watercooling based options and regaining control over these headers may be one of them). One thing to note: on my Code you must disable or control AIO and W-Pump as a pair. One control for both, thus you won’t want a fan on one and a pump on the other.

 

-All the other fan delays can be accessed from this page as well. Select the CHA fan line and it will take you to another page will a long list of control points and fans. I don't think you have any other motherboard controllable fans on the CHA headers, so just keep this in mind for future activities.

 

 

 

 

Side stuff

1) VRM (heat sink above CPU), PCH (chipset behind the Asus shield under GPU, general motherboard sensor (likely near PCI #3, but varies), and some others not so useful. If you connect the 10K thermistor wire, that will be another usable one that does have value.

 

2) It does and it is most likely hooked into the GPUs built in fan. Often they steal power from the card as well for the fan. I would have to look up that model and see for sure, but most hybrids work this way. What would be neat is if the fan connector was external giving you the option of hooking into a CHA fan and taking manual control. Often the GPU fans run a bit too fast for comfort.

 

3) I hope the new airflow fans are PWM, but I can't even dig up the product page right now for some reason. If they are controllable, don't max them out. Way too buzzy. I normally would tell you drop them entirely, but it kind of has a nice synergy with your overall case look.

 

4) Absolutely don't need it. My Code X 8700K at 5.0/1.30 has load VRM temperatures lower than my X99 idling at the desktop. VRM temps are laughable low on Asus Z370. This would be for sport overclocking or some other very unusual case configuration. I have never broken 50C on mine. That's about 75C below the limit.

 

5) Probably, but learning a new board takes time and it is better digested in bits. It's not necessary to change most things in the BIOS and it is better to leave it alone unless you are sure what it is. That will take some time.

Edited by c-attack
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Step 1 & 2 are conveniently right next to each other - Restart and mash delete to get into the BIOS. You likely default to the 'EZ BIOS'. Press F7 once there to change to the Advanced BIOS that looks like a bunch of text columns.

 

- Use the arrow keys to move over to the 'Monitor' Tab.

- Scroll all the way to very bottom past all the temp readings. Down there is Q-Fan.

- Should be a short list of things and this is a manual, non-picture interface. Two to three lines down will be CPU Fan. It probably shows PWM. Select that line and a drop down will appear. Select 'disabled'. This does not disable the power, only the control and locks you at 100%. You can do the same thing from EZ BIOS by selecting 'Full Speed'. However, we have more thing to do right here.

 

-At the bottom of this Q-Fan page is the AIO/W_Pump header control. It should be set to a default "disabled", again meaning 100% all the time. If you hit Enter on that word, you will again get the drop down and can select DC (3 pin) or PWM (4 pin). Upon doing that, you will get three lines to enter temperature points, fan speeds, and Control Source (yeah). Also, the previously mentioned fan delays are here. +12 sec will do for any case fan. Depending on source, you may not need it, but definitely for CPU temp. (I can't be 100% sure my Code is the same as the Hero. The Code/Formula have a few more watercooling based options and regaining control over these headers may be one of them). One thing to note: on my Code you must disable or control AIO and W-Pump as a pair. One control for both, thus you won’t want a fan on one and a pump on the other.

 

-All the other fan delays can be accessed from this page as well. Select the CHA fan line and it will take you to another page will a long list of control points and fans. I don't think you have any other motherboard controllable fans on the CHA headers, so just keep this in mind for future activities.

 

 

 

 

Side stuff

1) VRM (heat sink above CPU), PCH (chipset behind the Asus shield under GPU, general motherboard sensor (likely near PCI #3, but varies), and some others not so useful. If you connect the 10K thermistor wire, that will be another usable one that does have value.

 

2) It does and it is most likely hooked into the GPUs built in fan. Often they steal power from the card as well for the fan. I would have to look up that model and see for sure, but most hybrids work this way. What would be neat is if the fan connector was external giving you the option of hooking into a CHA fan and taking manual control. Often the GPU fans run a bit too fast for comfort.

 

3) I hope the new airflow fans are PWM, but I can't even dig up the product page right now for some reason. If they are controllable, don't max them out. Way too buzzy. I normally would tell you drop them entirely, but it kind of has a nice synergy with your overall case look.

 

4) Absolutely don't need it. My Code X 8700K at 5.0/1.30 has load VRM temperatures lower than my X99 idling at the desktop. VRM temps are laughable low on Asus Z370. This would be for sport overclocking or some other very unusual case configuration. I have never broken 50C on mine. That's about 75C below the limit.

 

5) Probably, but learning a new board takes time and it is better digested in bits. It's not necessary to change most things in the BIOS and it is better to leave it alone unless you are sure what it is. That will take some time.

 

OK, so I got home and do some testing, this is the results:

First I plugged the radiator to the CPU fan, I still didn't touch the bios setting for this one like you said, I will install windows first, install the Link and then do that bios setup for the CPU fan.

Then I tested this weird fun hub.

First I changed the fan at the 4 pin with one fan on the 3 pin, turn the PC on and again, 2 fans were at 100% and one, but this time not the same one, was at the rpm like on the Aio fan picture at the bios (after changing the aio pump header to pwm in the bios and set different modes, the fan react to that modes, but only the same specific fan, not the other two)

Then I plugged the hub to from the aio header to a chasis fan, and it was the same like the aio pump head, just in here I could set the temps according different areas (CPU, pch, motherboard and t sensor which I don't have, and crap, vrm wasn't there) unlike the aio head who just get my temps command without any connection to the sensors.

And after that I was so angry, that I unplug 2 fans from the hub, connected one to cha fan 3, one to h amp fan and the last one I kept at the hub, connected to the only 4 pin there and the hub pwm cable connected back to the aio. Now I can control each one of them (like I didn't want to....) and the hub is controlled like a stupid one, with my commands, and the 2 else connected to the motherboard and pch sensors and I put them on 'standard' mode.

 

Some questions :

1. What is that t sensor and what new options he will open for me ? And with him I will be able to see vrm or memory sensor ?

2. All the motherboard pwm fans are must be connected to some part sensor, I can't put it on 'n/a' or something.

So if I make them follow some sensor and give them the temps and how to behave according the temps of that sensor, will I be able to control those fans differently when I will install windows and Asus AI or fan expert 4 ? Or it will do some trouble because the bios said this mode and at the program I will choose other rpm ?

3. From some reason, the fan connected to the h amp fan connection can't get low then 60%, even when I choose the minimum temps and come the change the rpm for that temps, I can't choose something under 60.. but ! I can change the whole mode from manual (with the 60% problem) to standard, turbo or any other built in mode, and then it can be lower then 60%..

4. I have some feelings that the hub is fine. And from some reason, I feel like the hub 'problem' that he can control the 4 pin fan only and the 2 other fans on the 3 pin on 100%, is has to do with that the fans are 4 pin pwm connected to 3 pin.

What do you think ?

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1) The sensor is an inexpensive 10K temperature sensor. You can get it from Amazon (or a ton of other places). It allows you to place the sensor at a key location to better and more accurately control the interior case temperature. With a water cooled system, this is actually the temperature that you care about most for controlling system fans.

 

2) You will be able to control the fans with Asus AI/Fan Expert. You don't have to. I, personally, do not recommend installing Asus AI - it's caused me no end of trouble. But ... YMMV. There are those that think it's all that and a slice of cheese.

 

3) Typically, it's DC-mode fans that cannot be below 60%. That's because they modify the voltage and the lower limit is typically 7V. With PWM fans, you should be able to go much lower.

 

4) PWM fans connected to a 3 pin controller won't operate properly, especially the ML fans. They do require the full 12V to operate (for the levitation) where some PWM fans can operate in DC and PWM mode. Do you have a link to this mysterious fan hub? Or a photo? I really don't know what this is and I'm not as intimately familiar with NZXT's products as I am with Corsairs (this being a Corsair forum and all ...)

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Some questions :

1. What is that t sensor and what new options he will open for me ? And with him I will be able to see vrm or memory sensor ?

2. All the motherboard pwm fans are must be connected to some part sensor, I can't put it on 'n/a' or something.

So if I make them follow some sensor and give them the temps and how to behave according the temps of that sensor, will I be able to control those fans differently when I will install windows and Asus AI or fan expert 4 ? Or it will do some trouble because the bios said this mode and at the program I will choose other rpm ?

3. From some reason, the fan connected to the h amp fan connection can't get low then 60%, even when I choose the minimum temps and come the change the rpm for that temps, I can't choose something under 60.. but ! I can change the whole mode from manual (with the 60% problem) to standard, turbo or any other built in mode, and then it can be lower then 60%..

4. I have some feelings that the hub is fine. And from some reason, I feel like the hub 'problem' that he can control the 4 pin fan only and the 2 other fans on the 3 pin on 100%, is has to do with that the fans are 4 pin pwm connected to 3 pin.

What do you think ?

 

1) T-Sensor is Thermistor or Temperature sensor. This is what we have been suggesting to you all along. It's just a wire. Goes into a little spot on the motherboard. Takes temp readings from the other end. It would be very useful for your set-up. You don't have a lot of case heat to get rid of. CPU temps are H150i controlled. GPU has its own cooling system. For your configuration, you probably want the top exhaust to match (roughly) what the H150i fans are doing. Those top fans will get rid of the CPU radiator waste heat. It makes for an easy control. All you do is tape one end of the wire to the back side of radiator. I have four of these in my case for the same purpose.

 

Yeah, the VRM sensor issue on Asus Z370 boards. I almost forgot. There is a VRM temp sensor on your board. Asus just doesn't think you need to know what it says and correspondingly that makes it a non-choice for fan control. There was a lot of flap at board release with some Hero X being able to see, others not, then I think Asus wiped them all in BIOS update somewhere. The sensor is still there. You can read it with HWiNFO and probably some other monitoring programs. I have no idea why Asus did this. It's idiotic. Everyone noticed. Lots of complaints. No explanations. Regardless, you don't get a lot of VRM movement on these so it is not as useful a control variable as on some older boards. No motherboard memory temp sensor. You will see this in Link/iCUE with your Dominators.

 

2) No, there has to be a control source. If you don't like any of them, you can go to EZ BIOS section and fix the fan speed (or set it in the ADV BIOS to something like 20C=40%, 30C=40%, 40C=40%). Now, as to AI Suite... my advice is to skip it. It is a terrible monitoring program. It polls every 5 or even 10 seconds on some things, the UI is completely nonadjustable, and it gives you access to a bunch of things on the desktop that you should not be messing with while on the desktop. In order to do that, it runs and interfaces with a bunch of things that cause endless conflicts and problems. The list is a mile long. Its one saving grace was you got desktop control of your fans and it could use a little fan controller magic to make DC fans run below the normal minimum 60%. That was useful. However, it is no longer needed at all since this feature has been added to the BIOS. Back in that same Monitor->Q-Fan section we were discussing earlier, you will see an option to "Configure Fans (or Q-Fan)". It will then give you a pop-up warning. This does what AI Suite used to. It runs all the fans from max to min and established new lower speeds and properly calibrates those percentages. You should definitely do this AFTER we get this Fan Hub thing straighten out. Every time you move a fan, you will have to do it again, so wait for now.

 

Other reasons not to install AI Suite:

 

a) You don't need it. The only BIOS/AI Suite controllable fans will be these top ones. Hardly worth the hassle and risk to set the speed for a non-crucial set. Whether the top fans run at 600 or 1000 rpm will little effect on your system performance. It will be about noise comfort level. Once you find that, you won't mess with them anymore. Oh, and you can already do all the things it can do from the BIOS, including the fan delays.

 

b) You can't/shouldn't use AI Suite with Corsair Link or iCUE. You definitely want and need the Corsair software for all your new toys. Link and iCUE have some faults, but they are better and more versatile programs than AI Suite. And again, anything AI Suite can do, so can you from the BIOS.

 

3) H-AMP (and probably W_Pump too) - Those are some of the idiosyncrasies I was referring to. It is supposed to be a PWM header, but it often does DC controller like things (100% power on, 60% minimum). Whether this is a necessary byproduct of its function or Asus just used a cheap workaround I don't know. I've seen lots of people ask at Asus. No one ever gets an answer. This is one of the reasons I suggested not using the fan hub on that header. I think I would prefer CPU fan, set to CPU temp, and the 8 second delay. In fact, of all your variable choices at present, that might be the best choice until you get a cheap little thermistor wire for the T sensor.

 

4) I am not sure I quite understood everything you said in the first paragraphs, but essentially it sounds like the fan connected to the 4 pin does what you expect and the other 2 on the 3 pin are stuck at 100%, no matter the control header. I am in the same boat as Dev and I am not familiar with this piece of hardware, although it really should be the same as any other splitter of this type. One thing to take a look at is if it requires you to run the fans in numerical order. For example, 3 fans must go on connectors 1,2,3. Some are wired serially like this. The other connectors are supposed to be 3 pin. If you had the 4th tachometer (speed) pin on each one, they would all send a PWM signal back to the controller and the entire array would be a disaster of crossed signals. Only 1 speed pulse per controller.

Edited by c-attack
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OK, I found some pictures of your fan hub. It is a circuit board and I am starting to get a clearer idea and I think I may have found the issue. For this controller, you need to run the NZXT female to female cable from the white labeled header on the circuit board back to CPU fan or any other true PWM header. (NZXT says CPU fan in the manual because that is the only one they can be sure is PWM.) There should not be a fan on the white 4 pin connection. The three fans will go below that, ALL on 3 pin headers. The motherboard gives the speed signal to the little cicuit board. The circuit board will give the PWM signal to all of the 3 pin had headers.

 

In my mind I was seeing a more simple arrangement, like a traditional splitter. This is wired differently.

Edited by c-attack
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1) The sensor is an inexpensive 10K temperature sensor. You can get it from Amazon (or a ton of other places). It allows you to place the sensor at a key location to better and more accurately control the interior case temperature. With a water cooled system, this is actually the temperature that you care about most for controlling system fans.

 

2) You will be able to control the fans with Asus AI/Fan Expert. You don't have to. I, personally, do not recommend installing Asus AI - it's caused me no end of trouble. But ... YMMV. There are those that think it's all that and a slice of cheese.

 

3) Typically, it's DC-mode fans that cannot be below 60%. That's because they modify the voltage and the lower limit is typically 7V. With PWM fans, you should be able to go much lower.

 

4) PWM fans connected to a 3 pin controller won't operate properly, especially the ML fans. They do require the full 12V to operate (for the levitation) where some PWM fans can operate in DC and PWM mode. Do you have a link to this mysterious fan hub? Or a photo? I really don't know what this is and I'm not as intimately familiar with NZXT's products as I am with Corsairs (this being a Corsair forum and all ...)

 

1) T-Sensor is Thermistor or Temperature sensor. This is what we have been suggesting to you all along. It's just a wire. Goes into a little spot on the motherboard. Takes temp readings from the other end. It would be very useful for your set-up. You don't have a lot of case heat to get rid of. CPU temps are H150i controlled. GPU has its own cooling system. For your configuration, you probably want the top exhaust to match (roughly) what the H150i fans are doing. Those top fans will get rid of the CPU radiator waste heat. It makes for an easy control. All you do is tape one end of the wire to the back side of radiator. I have four of these in my case for the same purpose.

 

Yeah, the VRM sensor issue on Asus Z370 boards. I almost forgot. There is a VRM temp sensor on your board. Asus just doesn't think you need to know what it says and correspondingly that makes it a non-choice for fan control. There was a lot of flap at board release with some Hero X being able to see, others not, then I think Asus wiped them all in BIOS update somewhere. The sensor is still there. You can read it with HWiNFO and probably some other monitoring programs. I have no idea why Asus did this. It's idiotic. Everyone noticed. Lots of complaints. No explanations. Regardless, you don't get a lot of VRM movement on these so it is not as useful a control variable as on some older boards. No motherboard memory temp sensor. You will see this in Link/iCUE with your Dominators.

 

2) No, there has to be a control source. If you don't like any of them, you can go to EZ BIOS section and fix the fan speed (or set it in the ADV BIOS to something like 20C=40%, 30C=40%, 40C=40%). Now, as to AI Suite... my advice is to skip it. It is a terrible monitoring program. It polls every 5 or even 10 seconds on some things, the UI is completely nonadjustable, and it gives you access to a bunch of things on the desktop that you should not be messing with while on the desktop. In order to do that, it runs and interfaces with a bunch of things that cause endless conflicts and problems. The list is a mile long. Its one saving grace was you got desktop control of your fans and it could use a little fan controller magic to make DC fans run below the normal minimum 60%. That was useful. However, it is no longer needed at all since this feature has been added to the BIOS. Back in that same Monitor->Q-Fan section we were discussing earlier, you will see an option to "Configure Fans (or Q-Fan)". It will then give you a pop-up warning. This does what AI Suite used to. It runs all the fans from max to min and established new lower speeds and properly calibrates those percentages. You should definitely do this AFTER we get this Fan Hub thing straighten out. Every time you move a fan, you will have to do it again, so wait for now.

 

Other reasons not to install AI Suite:

 

a) You don't need it. The only BIOS/AI Suite controllable fans will be these top ones. Hardly worth the hassle and risk to set the speed for a non-crucial set. Whether the top fans run at 600 or 1000 rpm will little effect on your system performance. It will be about noise comfort level. Once you find that, you won't mess with them anymore. Oh, and you can already do all the things it can do from the BIOS, including the fan delays.

 

b) You can't/shouldn't use AI Suite with Corsair Link or iCUE. You definitely want and need the Corsair software for all your new toys. Link and iCUE have some faults, but they are better and more versatile programs than AI Suite. And again, anything AI Suite can do, so can you from the BIOS.

 

3) H-AMP (and probably W_Pump too) - Those are some of the idiosyncrasies I was referring to. It is supposed to be a PWM header, but it often does DC controller like things (100% power on, 60% minimum). Whether this is a necessary byproduct of its function or Asus just used a cheap workaround I don't know. I've seen lots of people ask at Asus. No one ever gets an answer. This is one of the reasons I suggested not using the fan hub on that header. I think I would prefer CPU fan, set to CPU temp, and the 8 second delay. In fact, of all your variable choices at present, that might be the best choice until you get a cheap little thermistor wire for the T sensor.

 

4) I am not sure I quite understood everything you said in the first paragraphs, but essentially it sounds like the fan connected to the 4 pin does what you expect and the other 2 on the 3 pin are stuck at 100%, no matter the control header. I am in the same boat as Dev and I am not familiar with this piece of hardware, although it really should be the same as any other splitter of this type. One thing to take a look at is if it requires you to run the fans in numerical order. For example, 3 fans must go on connectors 1,2,3. Some are wired serially like this. The other connectors are supposed to be 3 pin. If you had the 4th tachometer (speed) pin on each one, they would all send a PWM signal back to the controller and the entire array would be a disaster of crossed signals. Only 1 speed pulse per controller.

 

OK, so about the fan hub I need to get pwm cable with 2 female sides, one to the 4 pin white connection and the other to CPU fan or other chasis fan and hope it will be a 'true' pwm connection.

But it won't still be some conflicts because the 4 pin connected to a 3 pin like Dev said ?

Although I think I'm just keep it that way.. cause 2 top fans are connected to chasis pwm, and only one at this h amp that I can control only with built in mode, and not manually because then it only 60% minimum.. so I will leave it like that, and when the t 10k sensor will arrive I will make them follow him.

 

1. This sensor have a couple of heads ? I only saw 1 head when I searched In amazon.. you think a couple of heads will be needed ? Because I thought about put one head under the ssd, I have the 960 pro 1tb and I heard about his heat problem that cause less performance, and you said one for the 'CPU' or radiator waste heat, where else ? Or that's enough and even not needed and only the CPU matter ?

By the way, I don't understand where you want to put the sensor, where exactly you mean at the back ? No matter where at the back where all the heat come inside the case from the radiator or at specific location ?

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The 10K sensor will only have one head, one measurement. I've lost track, at this point, at where c-attack suggested that you place it. But you'd want it somewhere inside the case to make sure that you keep that relatively cool.

 

You can read the Samsung 960 Pro's temperature with any tool that reads drive temperatures. Crystal Disk Info is excellent ... it'll give you the drive temp and a whole bunch more. That said, as long as your internal case temperatures are managed well, it's pretty unlikely that you'll get that 960 to throttle. The little sliver of copper that the put on top to act as a heat spreader/heat sink actually seems to work quite well.

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The 10K sensor will only have one head, one measurement. I've lost track, at this point, at where c-attack suggested that you place it. But you'd want it somewhere inside the case to make sure that you keep that relatively cool.

 

You can read the Samsung 960 Pro's temperature with any tool that reads drive temperatures. Crystal Disk Info is excellent ... it'll give you the drive temp and a whole bunch more. That said, as long as your internal case temperatures are managed well, it's pretty unlikely that you'll get that 960 to throttle. The little sliver of copper that the put on top to act as a heat spreader/heat sink actually seems to work quite well.

 

OK, I just don't understand where c attack told me to put the sensor.. I think to just put it between the radiator and the memories.. that I will be able to monitor the hot air came from the radiator inside the case..

 

By the way, I have the third fan on top placed on the aio pump connection, and if I'm not wrong, when I played with the levels of rpm according the temp to this fan, it didn't had an option to follow some part, so according which part it will low or raise it's temperature ?

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1) I would probably get a $4 PWM splitter. Just the wire version like this. They are all generic and pretty much the same, but make sure it is PWM. This will let you chain two of the top fans together on either CPU or OPT while the third sits on the other. They will all run the same speed. In fact, now that I think about it, it probably makes more sense to get a 3 way PWM splitter, if you are going to try and change to the T_Sensor control. Since you can't run from anything except CPU temp on CPU/OPT, you will need a CHA header. You can safely run 3 ML120 PRO on a 1.0A limit header. Those are just examples. Most brands work with the only differences being in how the wire is structured (branching or ziz-zag).

 

2) Thermistor or T_Sensor - Again, just a wire. Often come in different lengths as well. Pretty sure the Hero insert point is on the front edge of the board, under the SATA connections. It will be listed in the manual. One end goes there. The broad, flat end will measure the air temp as it goes past. My suggestion is to tape it to the back side of the front radiator. The air temp coming off the radiator is essentially equivalent to the coolant temp, as read by Link. This is a way to bridge the gap between the Corsair and Asus control systems. Since the GPU radiator hopefully exhausts out the back, the only thing the top fans need to do is remove CPU waste heat. You can make a BIOS curve that is similar to your H150i fan curve. Keep in mind since the top fans are not blocked by the radiator, they will move a lot more air at the same speed. That means you can run them slower than the front and still be effective.

 

You don't have to tape it to the middle of the radiator and the way the thing is designed the coolant goes up one side and down the other. The sensor end just needs to peek around the corner onto the rear of radiator. The rest can be taped along the side of the radiator where you can't see it. I ran one out the back as well for my GPU radiator so I could get control over its fan, using the same principle. The front position will be a much shorter run.

 

EDIT - I went into my BIOS and AIO and W_PUMP are just like CPU fan. While you can turn them back into DC/PWM governable fan headers, you are stuck with CPU temp as the only control variable. You are fine using this short term (and probably long term as well), but the T_Sensor set up is the more efficient and meaningful control. On the Code X, the two headers appear to be tied together. What you set for W_PUMP is applied to AIO and vice versa. Since the H150's motherboard header doesn't really control anything, you could set AIO/W_Pump to pwm, then put the top fans across CPU/OPT/AIO, with the H150i on W Pump. Location is probably key. My W_Pump header is the bottom. Not really useful for the top exhaust. Might be better for the H150. Still, the two or three way splitter is probably the best option for CPU fan or a CHA header. If the one maxed out fan is annoying you right now, unplug it. You don't need that fan to spin for the other two to remove the waste heat. They can do it on their own.

Edited by c-attack
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1) I would probably get a $4 PWM splitter. Just the wire version like this. They are all generic and pretty much the same, but make sure it is PWM. This will let you chain two of the top fans together on either CPU or OPT while the third sits on the other. They will all run the same speed. In fact, now that I think about it, it probably makes more sense to get a 3 way PWM splitter, if you are going to try and change to the T_Sensor control. Since you can't run from anything except CPU temp on CPU/OPT, you will need a CHA header. You can safely run 3 ML120 PRO on a 1.0A limit header. Those are just examples. Most brands work with the only differences being in how the wire is structured (branching or ziz-zag).

 

2) Thermistor or T_Sensor - Again, just a wire. Often come in different lengths as well. Pretty sure the Hero insert point is on the front edge of the board, under the SATA connections. It will be listed in the manual. One end goes there. The broad, flat end will measure the air temp as it goes past. My suggestion is to tape it to the back side of the front radiator. The air temp coming off the radiator is essentially equivalent to the coolant temp, as read by Link. This is a way to bridge the gap between the Corsair and Asus control systems. Since the GPU radiator hopefully exhausts out the back, the only thing the top fans need to do is remove CPU waste heat. You can make a BIOS curve that is similar to your H150i fan curve. Keep in mind since the top fans are not blocked by the radiator, they will move a lot more air at the same speed. That means you can run them slower than the front and still be effective.

 

You don't have to tape it to the middle of the radiator and the way the thing is designed the coolant goes up one side and down the other. The sensor end just needs to peek around the corner onto the rear of radiator. The rest can be taped along the side of the radiator where you can't see it. I ran one out the back as well for my GPU radiator so I could get control over its fan, using the same principle. The front position will be a much shorter run.

 

EDIT - I went into my BIOS and AIO and W_PUMP are just like CPU fan. While you can turn them back into DC/PWM governable fan headers, you are stuck with CPU temp as the only control variable. You are fine using this short term (and probably long term as well), but the T_Sensor set up is the more efficient and meaningful control. On the Code X, the two headers appear to be tied together. What you set for W_PUMP is applied to AIO and vice versa. Since the H150's motherboard header doesn't really control anything, you could set AIO/W_Pump to pwm, then put the top fans across CPU/OPT/AIO, with the H150i on W Pump. Location is probably key. My W_Pump header is the bottom. Not really useful for the top exhaust. Might be better for the H150. Still, the two or three way splitter is probably the best option for CPU fan or a CHA header. If the one maxed out fan is annoying you right now, unplug it. You don't need that fan to spin for the other two to remove the waste heat. They can do it on their own.

 

Fantastic man, I will order the sensor and the pwm splitter and when they'll arrive I will do all the connections with hope everything will work fantastic.

What angry me a little is the case custom plastics covers at the front and from the top. This on of the things that makes this case so beautiful in my opinion, but now, that I'm a little more understand things and not only look for nice case but also look for performance, I see that those plastic covers block the air from coming in and going out. There are one 'V' at the front and one at the top that can get a clean air to come in/blow outside, but all the rest just cover all the fans directions..

Although there is some gap between that net below the fans and the plastic covers and the air is run outside/inside from there, for example at the top, I feel the air on my face because that gap and because the top is blocked so they get out from the sides gap..

It's the same story like the crystal glass cases I think.

I'm right and without those plastic covers I would have see a little better temps or the gap and other things make this OK ?

Edit - my case is the NZXT Noctis Rog 450, you can look for photos of the case and see what I'm talking about..

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