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Running case fans based on GPU temperature


Phil Lee
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I have a 115i Pro to cool my CPU and an air cooled EVGA GTX 1070 in my case. I also have a Commander Pro although my case fans are currently hooked up to the motherboard.

 

When gaming, my CPU is typically around 60C and my GPU is around 64C. My case fans are controlled using Asus FanXpert 4 based on CPU package temperature. I overclock my 6700K to 4.7GHz at 1.35V and the 1070 by +120 GPU/+550 Memory. The system is stable.

 

Looking some more at Link, I could connect my case fans to the Commander Pro then control them based on the GPU temperature. This seems more logical to me in a gaming rig, especially one where CPU temperature is managed by the AIO.

 

Does anyone here control their case fans based on GPU temperature?

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Hi Phil ...

You can do that. I don't ... kinda. One of the awesome things about the CoPro is the temperature probes that it comes with. So I use those temperature probes for the baseline for my fan curve. This way, you don't need to have Link running for the fan curve to apply; it runs in the CoPro's hardware. Now ... one of those sensors is in the area just above the GPU. This is the part of the case that the GPU heats up. Most of my case fans are based on that temperature - so they actually wind up working (indirectly) off of the GPU temperature. But the fan curves work all the time, whether Link is running or not, including at system startup.

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Yes, you can do this, but Link must be running. This makes sense to me and I have previously done it with my C-Pro and a GPU AIO cooler. The potential fly in the ointment is I don't know how AI Suite and Link will react together. Presumably you are going it now without dire consequences. Usually the end result is scrambled sensor data which then precludes effective control. GPU temp is not often affected.

 

Another alternative with the C-Pro is to use one of its temp probes as the control source for the case fans. You can place the sensor end behind the rear exhaust fan or just above the GPU backplate (usually toward the rear works well). It does not have to measure literal GPU temp, but as long as it has a predictable and wide enough range, it makes for an effective control variable. The advantage of doing it this way is the C-Pro can still regulate the fan speeds even with Link closed. This can be very handy if you run into issues trying to get multiple hybrid monitoring/control programs to co-exist. You'll probably want to try the GPU temp first, but this is an viable alternative if needed.

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Hi Phil ...

Now ... one of those sensors is in the area just above the GPU. This is the part of the case that the GPU heats up. Most of my case fans are based on that temperature - so they actually wind up working (indirectly) off of the GPU temperature. But the fan curves work all the time, whether Link is running or not, including at system startup.

 

How did you locate the temperature sensor above the GPU? Is it stuck to something or floating in mid air somehow?

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I have the cord zip tied to one of my pump hoses and then the sensor "floating" about 2 inches or so over the GPU backplate.

 

I could do that or have it tied to the AIO USB cable. Thanks for the idea. I'll post a pic once I've had a chance to do it. I have one sensor monitoring the radiator exhaust, one the case exhaust, one in my hard drive cage and one above the PSU. I think I'll move that one.

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On my case I could route the thermistor cable out the back of the "PSU side" and then tuck the sensor element through one of the little PCI-E grates just above. It doesn't really matter too much, although direct contact is likely to give you wacky results.
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I have a 115i Pro to cool my CPU and an air cooled EVGA GTX 1070 in my case. I also have a Commander Pro although my case fans are currently hooked up to the motherboard.

 

When gaming, my CPU is typically around 60C and my GPU is around 64C. My case fans are controlled using Asus FanXpert 4 based on CPU package temperature. I overclock my 6700K to 4.7GHz at 1.35V and the 1070 by +120 GPU/+550 Memory. The system is stable.

 

Looking some more at Link, I could connect my case fans to the Commander Pro then control them based on the GPU temperature. This seems more logical to me in a gaming rig, especially one where CPU temperature is managed by the AIO.

 

Does anyone here control their case fans based on GPU temperature?

 

I run my fans based on the GPU temp, and it might not work for everyone, but my Noctua cooler is so good that even when I use the CPU as the basis for my fan curve, it doesn't change the temps at all.

 

I like the GPU-based approach because I really only need the extra cooling when I'm gaming and I still get the dead-silence when I'm in work mode.

 

The only fan I have running from my Motherboard is my CPU fan itself. All the others are connected to the Commander Pro and set to use the GPU as the basis for the custom fan curve.

Edited by donalgodon
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FanXpert can do what you want as long it's not on the cpu header and if you really wanted to you can have the fans based on vrm temps. Commander Pro can also do the same without using a temp probe so not sure why DevBiker is using one. The temp sensor becomes useful for custom water cooling so you can have your fans based on the water temps.
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I use the temp probe so that the fan curve doesn't require software (Link or iCue) to operate. Otherwise, the fans will be at 100% until the software loads.

As for motherboard temps ... first, Link isn't always on target with those, especially on the Asus motherboards. Second, it's always fun to guess where the 5 different sensors actually are on the motherboard.

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I use the temp probe so that the fan curve doesn't require software (Link or iCue) to operate. Otherwise, the fans will be at 100% until the software loads.

As for motherboard temps ... first, Link isn't always on target with those, especially on the Asus motherboards. Second, it's always fun to guess where the 5 different sensors actually are on the motherboard.

 

Strange since I just set most of my fans to gpu temp, closed iCue and loaded a game and the fans turned on at 30c like I asked it to.

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The Link Service likely is running in task manager and handling some details. In that state, you can open up HWINFO, HWMonitor, etc. and still see your cooler and C-Pro as registered devices. Kill the service and those go away. If you were to disable Link as a start-up program or kill the service after closing, you would lose this ability.
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The Link Service likely is running in task manager and handling some details. In that state, you can open up HWINFO, HWMonitor, etc. and still see your cooler and C-Pro as registered devices. Kill the service and those go away. If you were to disable Link as a start-up program or kill the service after closing, you would lose this ability.

 

Yup, exactly. This is one of the key differences between Link and iCue ... while both of them use a service to do the actually communication and control of devices, with Link, when you closed the UI app, it shut down the service. With iCue, the service loads when the OS loads and runs all the time.

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The Link Service likely is running in task manager and handling some details. In that state, you can open up HWINFO, HWMonitor, etc. and still see your cooler and C-Pro as registered devices. Kill the service and those go away. If you were to disable Link as a start-up program or kill the service after closing, you would lose this ability.

 

Hmm you right there is a service still running and when you kill it the fans did turn on when they shouldn't have. So I loaded Siv to see what happens, set my fans up to use gpu temp same as iCue and the fans turned on again, it seems to just go by cpu temps.

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I've got my system setup how I want it now. It's built in an NZXT H700i case.

 

i-Dfnn2zP-XL.jpg

 

I have the cooling setup as follows:

 

Intake: 3 Noctua NF-F12 industrialPPC-2000 PWM

Exhaust: 1 Corsair ML140 RGB

CPU: Corsair H115i Pro with 2 Corsair ML140 RGB pushing through the top mounted rad

 

The 4 case fans are connected to a Commander Pro which is also used to control the fan lighting. I have installed all 4 thermistors as follows:

 

CP1: in top radator space, zip tied to the vent so it doesn't touch the rad

CP2: zip tied to the AIO tube (see photo)

CP3: zip tied to exhaust grill

CP4: between my 2 hard drives

 

i-tCXQNGt-XL.jpg

 

I have created my own custom profile with the H115i Pro setup the same as the Balanced profile. I have setup custom fan curves for the 4 case fans. I went through each fan finding their rpm range then set them to run at minimum speed when the GPU is at 20C and maximum when it is at 80C. The GPU has its own fan profile which keeps it in the 60s so I never expect to reach max rpm on the case fans.

 

i-g6bpD5Q-L.png

 

i-PPr5vsz-M.png

 

I have also created a second profile based of the thermistor above the GPU. I am going to start by using the GPU temperature but may switch to the thermistor based one.

 

Thanks for all the help.

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I’ve spent another hour or so running tests and looking at temperatures in the case and on the components. I’ve been running Unigine Heaven as a simple test for my system. After about 15 minutes my graphics card GPU fan is the loudest fan by far. The GPU sits at 65C with the Memory at 60C. The CPU Package sits at around 40C with the fluid temperature at 28C. The thermistor above the GPU reports a high of 31C. Room temperature was around 19C for these tests.

 

I’ve changed the fan curves for the case fans when using this thermistor so that they are compressed. I wish the curve could be zoomed in on in Link.

 

I also ran some tests with the case fans running faster. I found the GPU thermistor got hotter with the GPU only getting fractionally cooler. There is definitely an optimum speed to run the case fans at to disperse the GPU heat.

 

A couple of times it’s been mentioned that the CP will run the fans based on the thermistor without Link running. How do I set this as the default profile when starting the system up?

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I’ve spent another hour or so running tests and looking at temperatures in the case and on the components. I’ve been running Unigine Heaven as a simple test for my system. After about 15 minutes my graphics card GPU fan is the loudest fan by far. The GPU sits at 65C with the Memory at 60C. The CPU Package sits at around 40C with the fluid temperature at 28C. The thermistor above the GPU reports a high of 31C. Room temperature was around 19C for these tests.

 

I’ve changed the fan curves for the case fans when using this thermistor so that they are compressed. I wish the curve could be zoomed in on in Link.

Yeah, I agree. With iCue in early release, I don't think that's likely. That said, iCue does allow you to set the fan curve points by typing in values, which works for me.

I also ran some tests with the case fans running faster. I found the GPU thermistor got hotter with the GPU only getting fractionally cooler. There is definitely an optimum speed to run the case fans at to disperse the GPU heat.

That's interesting. You may be better with higher exhaust speed. Something to consider.

A couple of times it’s been mentioned that the CP will run the fans based on the thermistor without Link running. How do I set this as the default profile when starting the system up?

It'll be the last profile that you had set when you shut down. Essentially, the fan curves are written to the CoPro when you select the profile. As long as your last profile has the curves that you want, you're good.

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Yeah, I agree. With iCue in early release, I don't think that's likely. That said, iCue does allow you to set the fan curve points by typing in values, which works for me.

 

I was looking at iCue and thinking of installing it but stopped when I saw the requirement for the latest version of Link which causes issues with the 115i Pro.

 

That's interesting. You may be better with higher exhaust speed. Something to consider.

 

I have a powerful set of intake fans but that means I can run them slowly. I have increased the exhaust fan speed. I guess to could increase the AIO fan speeds too since those are pushing air our.

 

It'll be the last profile that you had set when you shut down. Essentially, the fan curves are written to the CoPro when you select the profile. As long as your last profile has the curves that you want, you're good.

 

That’s good to know, thanks. Is it right that that only works for profiles based on the thermistors?

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I was looking at iCue and thinking of installing it but stopped when I saw the requirement for the latest version of Link which causes issues with the 115i Pro.

Ah, yes ... but as soon as Link sees iCue, it doesn't even try so there's no problems. Also, I've not had any issues with my H115i Pro and Link, with or without iCue installed. While the issue certainly is pretty widespread, it is by no means universal. Now ... you have ML fans, which iCue doesn't directly support. However, you can configure them as HD (3:1) or LL fans (4:1). TBH, that's how I had my ML fans configured in Link and even when iCue supports the ML fans, it's likely that I'll continue to have them configured as HD fans.

 

I have a powerful set of intake fans but that means I can run them slowly. I have increased the exhaust fan speed. I guess to could increase the AIO fan speeds too since those are pushing air our.

There are all kinds of variables that you can play with. That's one of the awesome things about the CoPro. :) Of course, you can also spend hours tweaking things just right. Not that I've ever done that. :cool:

 

That’s good to know, thanks. Is it right that that only works for profiles based on the thermistors?

That is correct. If it's based on any other value, Link or iCue needs to be running for the curves to take effect.

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I'm not able to help you in mapping case fans to GPU temp (as I use a lazier solution for keeping my build cool, which is: placing a portable AC such as these to blow cool, dehumidified air directly at my build), but I have to comment on the elegance of your build. It looks magnificent. :) Edited by gizzlerr
typo
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