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H115i water cooler wrong temp


Paani
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Whilst stress testing my CPU, I see that the temp that Corsair Link shows is much different from the one Core Temp shows.

 

43R40OO1QFiYxUYlFGliQA.png

 

Is it possible to fix this, or if the H115i temp is the water's temperature, is it possible to make the fan speed depend on the CPU temp?

 

Thanks!

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First, as you guessed, that is the temperature of the H115i's coolant. Not the CPU. Link should show the CPU temperatures as well but you didn't include a full screen shot.

 

That said, you really shouldn't base your fan speeds off of the CPU temperature but the H115i temperature. Think about it for a second ... what do the fans actually cool? Do they cool the CPU? NO. They do not cool the CPU. The coolant liquid, through the cold plate, cools the CPU. So what do those fans cool? They cool the liquid by pushing cool air over the radiator fins. CPU temperatures, especially recent generation Intels, vary widely. They spike and then drop at the slightest provocation. This will make your fan speeds go up and down ... up and down ... up and down. The coolant, however, will warm up (and cool down) more slowly and consistently, simply due to it's higher heat capacity. The pre-configured fan curves for the H115i are set to use the cooler's temp as the source for a very good reason.

 

Everyone wants to set the temp to CPU because that's what everyone has always done. That's because in the days of motherboard-control fans, that was the best temperature that we had available. But more and more motherboards are coming with additional sensors to use as sources for temperature curves. Some even allow you to plug in an additional sensor. Why? Because CPU temperature isn't always the most appropriate temperature to monitor for your system cooling. This is especially true when you have a water cooled CPU. And with devices like the Commander Pro, we can actually get pretty specific about what temperature is used for fan speed control.

 

Go through this forum. You'll see post after post after post after post after post where this is explained ... extensively.

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First, as you guessed, that is the temperature of the H115i's coolant. Not the CPU. Link should show the CPU temperatures as well but you didn't include a full screen shot.

 

That said, you really shouldn't base your fan speeds off of the CPU temperature but the H115i temperature. Think about it for a second ... what do the fans actually cool? Do they cool the CPU? NO. They do not cool the CPU. The coolant liquid, through the cold plate, cools the CPU. So what do those fans cool? They cool the liquid by pushing cool air over the radiator fins. CPU temperatures, especially recent generation Intels, vary widely. They spike and then drop at the slightest provocation. This will make your fan speeds go up and down ... up and down ... up and down. The coolant, however, will warm up (and cool down) more slowly and consistently, simply due to it's higher heat capacity. The pre-configured fan curves for the H115i are set to use the cooler's temp as the source for a very good reason.

 

Everyone wants to set the temp to CPU because that's what everyone has always done. That's because in the days of motherboard-control fans, that was the best temperature that we had available. But more and more motherboards are coming with additional sensors to use as sources for temperature curves. Some even allow you to plug in an additional sensor. Why? Because CPU temperature isn't always the most appropriate temperature to monitor for your system cooling. This is especially true when you have a water cooled CPU. And with devices like the Commander Pro, we can actually get pretty specific about what temperature is used for fan speed control.

 

Go through this forum. You'll see post after post after post after post after post where this is explained ... extensively.

 

Fair enough, I understand. Thanks. :)

 

I can see there's no need to even increase much, since the liquid's temperature is quite low anyway. It would make a small difference.

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