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Commander Pro temp Sensors?


Brandyberry
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They are optional.

However, if you do connect them and base fan speeds on those temperatures, the fan curves will run without Link. Otherwise, you'll have a period on startup, before Link starts, where the fans run at full speed.

Really, internal case ambient temperature is a better source. Unless they are liquid cooled, CPU and GPU do impact these and your case fans are intended to keep the ambient internal case temperature cool. If you have either of these liquid cooled, then controlling your case fans based on CPU is pointless; a liquid cooled CPU has no impact on internal case temps. Furthermore, ignoring your internal case temps can often hide serious issues with your overall cooling ... something we've seen on these forums more than once.

 

Oh ... and fan curves ... you do have preset curves for "Quiet", "Performance", "Balanced" ... but you'll probably want to do "Custom".

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They are optional.

However, if you do connect them and base fan speeds on those temperatures, the fan curves will run without Link. Otherwise, you'll have a period on startup, before Link starts, where the fans run at full speed.

Really, internal case ambient temperature is a better source. Unless they are liquid cooled, CPU and GPU do impact these and your case fans are intended to keep the ambient internal case temperature cool. If you have either of these liquid cooled, then controlling your case fans based on CPU is pointless; a liquid cooled CPU has no impact on internal case temps. Furthermore, ignoring your internal case temps can often hide serious issues with your overall cooling ... something we've seen on these forums more than once.

 

Oh ... and fan curves ... you do have preset curves for "Quiet", "Performance", "Balanced" ... but you'll probably want to do "Custom".

 

Thanks for the info. Yes I have a liquid cooler for the CPU, but it is blowing air out, as such I figured that would still be a somewhat reliable source for potential fan speed.

 

What serious issues have you seen?

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We've seen folks that don't manage the internal case temperature, base fan speeds on CPU and such ... the inside of the case, however, gets quite warm. Warm enough to impact radiator temperatures. Even comments that "the side of the computer is really warm".

 

Rebalancing airflow and setting the fan curves to the appropriate temperatures resolves the issues.

 

When balancing your fan speeds, you need to consider the question "What does the airflow from this fan do and what temperatures is it intended to control?" and then base your fan settings from that.

 

Case fans really manage internal case ambient temperatures. Not the CPU. Not the GPU. Now, if CPU and GPU are aircooled, they do directly affect these temperatures. But liquid cooled? Not at all. CPU temp has been the "traditional" source for fan curves because ... well ... most CPUs have been air cooled and because, with motherboard fan control, that's traditionally been the best you could do. But it's never been ideal for case temps. If you notice, most current motherboards have additional sensors that you can use for fan control and some even have a connection for an additional sensor.

 

With liquid cooling, another factor to consider is the temperature of the air going through the radiator. That represents the coolest that the coolant can be, which is then the coolest that the CPU can be. As your radiator is configured for exhaust, that's coming from inside the case. If your case gets up to 40C or more ... well, that's going to have a negative impact on everything else. And that will likely be warmer than the coolant ... which means it'll actually heat the coolant, rather than cooling it down.

What would be really, really cool is if Link would allow you to control fan speeds based on temperature deltas, rather than absolutes. One can dream, of course.

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We've seen folks that don't manage the internal case temperature, base fan speeds on CPU and such ... the inside of the case, however, gets quite warm. Warm enough to impact radiator temperatures. Even comments that "the side of the computer is really warm".

 

Rebalancing airflow and setting the fan curves to the appropriate temperatures resolves the issues.

 

When balancing your fan speeds, you need to consider the question "What does the airflow from this fan do and what temperatures is it intended to control?" and then base your fan settings from that.

 

Case fans really manage internal case ambient temperatures. Not the CPU. Not the GPU. Now, if CPU and GPU are aircooled, they do directly affect these temperatures. But liquid cooled? Not at all. CPU temp has been the "traditional" source for fan curves because ... well ... most CPUs have been air cooled and because, with motherboard fan control, that's traditionally been the best you could do. But it's never been ideal for case temps. If you notice, most current motherboards have additional sensors that you can use for fan control and some even have a connection for an additional sensor.

 

With liquid cooling, another factor to consider is the temperature of the air going through the radiator. That represents the coolest that the coolant can be, which is then the coolest that the CPU can be. As your radiator is configured for exhaust, that's coming from inside the case. If your case gets up to 40C or more ... well, that's going to have a negative impact on everything else. And that will likely be warmer than the coolant ... which means it'll actually heat the coolant, rather than cooling it down.

What would be really, really cool is if Link would allow you to control fan speeds based on temperature deltas, rather than absolutes. One can dream, of course.

 

 

I appreciate the reply and will reconsider using the temp sensors when I install tonight. What spots are most effective? Just areas around the case in general?

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Personally, I have:

1) Lower Case ... towards the bottom of the case and motherboard. Seriously considering moving this as it's always cool and doesn't really buy me anything.

2) Upper Case ... Probably a bad name but whatever. It's about 3-4 cm above the GPU. This one is pretty critical as this is the warmest area of the case. My case fans are tied to this.

3) Radiator Intake: Monitor this but don't have case fans tied to it. However, it's a candidate.

4) Radiator Exhaust: Monitor this but don't have case fans tied to it.

 

And my radiator fans are tied to the radiator pump temperature.

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The only thing to watch out for is in an efficient air exchange case, you might not have a huge range in ambient air temp in the box. Most GPUs heat things up enough to work, so perhaps a placement toward the back fan or GPU is most effective. If you take a lower front reading or someplace else, the actual delta may be too small to work.

 

My case is an extreme example of this. With both CPU and GPU waste heat expelled directly through radiators, my internal ambient typically only goes up 1 or maybe 2C during extended use. That is not enough to make a real control range and the room temp fluctuates far more than that.

 

An alternative solution is to use the coolant temp of the CPU cooler (it will need to be Corsair to work). Your real goal with case fans is to remove warm air and bring cooler air in its place. To that effect, you more of less are looking for the same rate of intake and exhaust. Since the presumably double panel cooler represents a decent chunk of your exhaust, you balance fans speeds to match its rate. Also, since the typical top mounted radiator heats up with CPU loads and from waste heat from CPU/GPU combo loads (gaming, etc), it usually offers a decent operating range to make a gradual curve.

 

A lot of this will depend on the management capabilities of your hardware. Those temp probes can still work off "coolant temp" by measuring exhaust temp from a radiator if you have some uncooperative software, like my X62, or none at all.

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