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High CPU Temps using H100i V2


DarkTemplar87
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Alright, I'm stumped.

Up until this morning, my cooler was working fine. Then when I went to reboot, I was getting a "Fan Speed Error" from the BIOS, as well as temps at around 80-90 degrees Celcius, just sitting in the BIOS. The only recent change I have made to my computer was the addition of an NVMe Drive. I have the power plug in the CPU_FAN header on my motherboard, and yet I have high-temperature warnings and neither my BIOS nor Corsair LINK register that I have a cooler plugged in. Here's a list of things that I have tried:

 

  • Disabled QFan in the BIOS
  • Remounted the heatsink, with fresh thermal paste
  • Double-checked all wires to make sure the cooler is indeed plugged in properly
  • Put my ear up to the cooler to see if the pump was running (it felt like it was when I put my hand on it)
  • Thoroughly cleaned the radiator
  • Checked the backplate on the motherboard
  • Uninstalled, and reinstalled Corsair Link
  • Let the CPU cool off before trying again

 

 

I've done all of this, and yet my CPU temps are showing no signs of improvement. If I hadn't disabled CPU Temp monitoring in the BIOS, I wouldn't have even been able to sign on.

I suspect there might be a water flow issue in the cooler itself, so I took the whole thing out and tilted it around a bit, with no success. When the CPU gets warm, I can feel that the water in the block is warm right next to the heatsink, however, all the water in the rest of the pipe seems cold, as well as the air coming off the radiator.

 

Corsair Customer Support is closed for the night, so any suggestions would be amazing. Would rather not have to deal with an RMA if avoidable.

 

Motherboard: ASUS Z170-A

CPU: Intel i7-6700K (base clock)

Cooler: Corsair H100i V2

 

I would post stress tests, but I'm afraid to even stay on my system for more than 10 or so minutes at a time.

 

Please help!

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No, keep it shutdown. All of that sounds like an electrical failure of the pump. The fan speed error means the BIOS can't get a return signal from the device, which it can't give because it isn't running.

 

Assuming this is a zero flow situation, you need to stay off it until a replacement can be secured. Corsair will RMA the cooler. Do the advanced RMA if you can to cut down on the shipping time wasted. If you have something else, put it on.

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No, keep it shutdown. All of that sounds like an electrical failure of the pump. The fan speed error means the BIOS can't get a return signal from the device, which it can't give because it isn't running.

 

Assuming this is a zero flow situation, you need to stay off it until a replacement can be secured. Corsair will RMA the cooler. Do the advanced RMA if you can to cut down on the shipping time wasted. If you have something else, put it on.

 

All fans spin and lights are on. Not 100% certain whether or not the pump is actually working. Would that still be consistent with an electrical failure?

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All fans spin and lights are on. Not 100% certain whether or not the pump is actually working. Would that still be consistent with an electrical failure?

 

Hmmm ... perhaps not. If not an electrical failure, you have a complete pump failure. With the temps you are seeing in the BIOS, it's pretty clear that it's gone kerflooey.

 

At this point, it doesn't matter. What c-attack said still holds. Do not operate the system with this cooler on it. If you have a backup, put it on. Get it RMA'd.

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The fan controller and pump do not have to die in unison, unless you do something to main power in. Typically a mechanical failure has some warning signs or noise in the build up to the end moment. When it was fine yesterday and now it's dead is more typical of a power-on overload where a circuit or contact in the pump fails. Electrical or mechanical, the no return signal from the pump is generally fatal. The only thing you can do is check to make sure the unit is receiving a full 12v signal, which you have already done. Sorry, I don't see a fix.
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The fan controller and pump do not have to die in unison, unless you do something to main power in. Typically a mechanical failure has some warning signs or noise in the build up to the end moment. When it was fine yesterday and now it's dead is more typical of a power-on overload where a circuit or contact in the pump fails. Electrical or mechanical, the no return signal from the pump is generally fatal. The only thing you can do is check to make sure the unit is receiving a full 12v signal, which you have already done. Sorry, I don't see a fix.

 

Darn. Well, thanks anyway for the support! I submitted a ticket to Corsair Support as well, so if they don't have any bright ideas I'll be requesting an RMA.

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