Jump to content
Corsair Community

P4C800-E Deluxe and Corsair DDR 550


altern8

Recommended Posts

i picked up a Intel 2.4c CPU, ASUS P4C800-E Deluxe, and a pair of Corsair 512mb TWINX1024-4400C25 / DDR-550 (XMS-4400) / 2.5-4-4-8 memory ... i overclock the CPU to 250FSB (3.0ghz) but unable to run the memory at 1:1 (forced to run at 5:4) ... my question is:

 

1) why cant i run the memory at 1:1 (250mhz=DDR500) at 250fsb (Prime95 will fail if it is set above 5:4, and so will memtest)? isnt my new memory rated for this type of overclocking? the only reason i swapped my Corsair 3200 was because i couldnt get the system to run at 1:1 ratio ...

 

2) i cant overlock my CPU past 250fsb since anything over 250fsb will result in prime95 and memtest failing ... i even try setting the memory at 3:2 and relaxing the timing without any success ...

 

thx

 

2)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It sounds as if your CPU does not want to run past 250mhz. It is certainly not the RAM unless you have a defective stick. If you run memtest on that MOBO, make sure you disable Legacy USB Support in the bios as there is a conflict with Memtest and that setting.

 

Also, what voltages are you running on the RAM and CPU? And, did you enable any of the performance options? What power supply are you using?

 

Mike.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i have the ram running at 2.85v, enermax 485w power supply ... i disabled all PAT and every other performance option i can think of ... unfortunately, memtest fails past 250fsb ... does that mean the ram is just capable over 250fsb?
Link to comment
Share on other sites

i have the ram running at 2.85v, enermax 485w power supply ... i disabled all PAT and every other performance option i can think of ... unfortunately, memtest fails past 250fsb ... does that mean the ram is just capable over 250fsb?

Memtest errors are not always the memory. In this case, it seems like your CPU is the culprit. Since your system fails at the 3:2 ratio, assuming you are still at 250mhz, your RAM would only be at 166mhz/DDR320 on the RAM. I really think you have some other problem.

 

What voltage are you running on the CPU?

Did you disable the legacy USB?

 

Mike.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

im currently 1.575 on the vcore ... i also disabled the legacy usb support ... im wondering if there is a issue with the Performance mode setting since i set it to standard instead of Turbo and CPU-Z tells me performance mode is ON ... are they referring to PAT? maybe i should try clearing out the cmos since i flash it and reset all the switches to default but performance continue to show up in CPU-Z as enabled ...
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wouldn't rely on CPU-Z in this case. What cooling do you have? You "might" need a bit more voltage on the CPU. Mine is at 1.6v now and doing fine. Odd thing is, that 2.4c will do 270FSB on stock Vcore but, I need 1.6v to be 110% stable. And, Standard is the best mode for the CPU.

 

Also, in the past, I had the best results with bios 1016Final for OCing the 2.4c. However, others have had good luck with 1017 Final.

 

Another thing you can try is to run Memtest on each stick individually. Lower your Vdimm to 2.75v also. The ICs in this RAM don't necessarily like more voltage as much as the Winbond ICs did. Try you OC with a single stick of RAM. This will reduce the load on the NB and possibly give you some clues.

 

Finally, since you are OCing, you need active NB cooling. Any type of fan on the stock heat sink will do but, you can also add some exotic solutions.

 

Good luck, Mike.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

btw ... what is your memory timing for your rig (in the bios) ... i would love to reach 3.3ghz on my 2.4c but just been very dissappointed by the whole experience ...

On that rig, it is the stock 3,4,4,8, burst at 8, turbo on AUTO. I always set memory timings manually, don't use SPD.

 

I'm really stumped here, any late production 2.4c should easily do 250+. That is unless Intel has done something behind the scenes. But, with OCing there is never any guarantee. You may simply have either a MOBO or CPU that won't run past 250mhz.

 

Also, keep in mind that many people swear by Prime95. If that is your goal, keep experimenting. However, I would suggest torture testing the rig specifically by doing what you built it for. If you can do all you want to, who cares if it won't pass a synthetic test?

 

Keep at it though, we may be overlooking sumpin. Mike.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

when i first started this project, i purchased a P4P800-SE mobo, 2.4c, and was using a pair of Corsair 3200 RAM ... i have since swapped the mobo and the memory without any luck (the originally mobo and memory also did 250fsb without any problems) ... i guess the dud is the CPU at this point ...

 

as far as the memory timing, im using the stock setting recommended by corsair and not using the SPD ...

 

as far as prime95 goes, doesnt it mean if prime95 fails, you could end up with miscalculated data which in turn can result in corrupt files, etc ???

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That seems VERY low. If you don't have any data on those drives yet, I'd bench them individually to see if they are running properly. Also, you may want to see if the drive manufacturer has a drive diagnostic you can try.

 

And, I have no idea about the Prime failure. However, I have seen machines that would not pass certain synthetic benchmarks but were otherwise stable.

 

Mike.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
i broke up the array and benched each drive individually, same result ... does it matter these drives are ata100 instead of ata133?
That should not matter at all. Even though the ATA-133 standard is faster on paper than ATA-100, it is no faster in practical application. The thruput on the HD is primarily dictated by the rotational speed of the drive. So, a 7200rpm ATA-100 drive and a 7200rpm ATA-133 drive are equal. It's like having a 100mph speedometer in your car and then, changing it to a 200mph speedo. Your car is no faster.

 

Mike.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That should not matter at all. Even though the ATA-133 standard is faster on paper than ATA-100, it is no faster in practical application. The thruput on the HD is primarily dictated by the rotational speed of the drive. So, a 7200rpm ATA-100 drive and a 7200rpm ATA-133 drive are equal. It's like having a 100mph speedometer in your car and then, changing it to a 200mph speedo. Your car is no faster.

 

Mike.

 

i borrowed 2 SATA drives from the office and WOW, what a diff, HDTACH and Sandra had the two drives beating the 10,000 RPM Raptor by a point or two ... just ordered two SATA and ditching this HD fiasco ...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...