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H80i v2 and Commander Pro


orion_jb2001
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  • 2 months later...

Since i have roughly the same question i thought i post here since it's not too old of an thread instead of creating a new one.

 

Also running an H80i V2 on the CPU and an H55 on the GPU. I have all fans connected to a fancontroller except those of the H80i for obvious reasons.

But turning on and off my (mostly) GPU fans is getting annoying. So i'm looking into the Commander Pro.

 

I have read that you can set a custom fancurve (even fans completely off?) as default without running Link as long as it is based on the temp sensors connected to the Com Pro. And NOT based of off motherboard sensors since that would need Link running.

This would work for my GPU fans. For now atleast.

 

But if the H80i fans are connected to the Com Pro and the USB header from the cooler is also plugged in the Com Pro extensions ports, can you set a custom curve for those fans based on the liquid temp from the H80i as a default setting?

Since the Commander Pro should be able to directly get that info from the cooler? Just as the temp sensors.

Just as you can with the fan controller build in the H80i where it works with the custom curve and led color before the OS loads.

 

Hope the question is clear.

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For the CoPro, you are correct. Fan curves based on CoPro thermistors do not require Link once configured. BUT ... the CoPro does not read the USB data stream from the H80iV2 or any other cooler. You cannot use those variables as sources for fan curves without requiring Link (or iCue) to be running.

 

To set a custom curve for the cooler that doesn't require Link to be running, you'll want to write those settings to the device as the default. To do that, go to Options ... Devices and you'll see a link under the H80iV2 to "Use current settings as default". This will affect only those fans that are connected directly to the H80i V2.

 

Make sense?

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Thank you, makes perfect sense.

 

Kinda assumed that the CoPro would not be able to read the liquid temps via USB. But sometimes just because it is not in the feature list or something does not always mean it is impossible.

 

Slowly starting to get info and plan for a new build. And thought about moving the current build to a new case already and move the H80i V2 to my GPU that currently has an H55 with an temp sensor from the hardware fancontroller. So i could have an automatic fancurve based on the liquid temp. Obviously that is still possible but the H80i V2 does not support zero rpm mode unlike the CoPro.

 

So taping the temp sensor to the hottest part of the rad from the CoPro which basically makes the "i" part of the cooler useless.

Or have Link running at all times.

Do you know to what % the CoPro defaults if it needs Link for the info but does not have access?

If that is 100% that would be a no go for me.

 

Ps.

I have an custom fancurve loaded in the H80i as default already, but thank you for the extra information.

 

Thanks again.

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So taping the temp sensor to the hottest part of the rad from the CoPro which basically makes the "i" part of the cooler useless.

Or have Link running at all times.

Do you know to what % the CoPro defaults if it needs Link for the info but does not have access?

If that is 100% that would be a no go for me.

 

I am not sure that is the take away from this. Taping a temp probe to your radiator exhaust will allow you to run the GPU fan to your specifications, even when Link is not running. Obviously it works while Link is active. This is a very good way to approximate coolant temperature (radiator exhaust more or less equals coolant temp) and I spent quite a while running a 120mm GPU rad in this fashion. It was one of the reasons I got the C-Pro.

 

With Link running, you can run other fan profiles from H80i v2 Temp, GPU temp, any of the temp probes, or a multitude of other choices. With Link closed, the H80i v2 will still follow the saved to device fan profile with coolant temp and the H55 can still follow the temp probe. This would appear to be a solution and likely enhancement of your current motherboard capabilities where control variable choice is often lacking.

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I am not sure that is the take away from this. Taping a temp probe to your radiator exhaust will allow you to run the GPU fan to your specifications, even when Link is not running. Obviously it works while Link is active. This is a very good way to approximate coolant temperature (radiator exhaust more or less equals coolant temp) and I spent quite a while running a 120mm GPU rad in this fashion. It was one of the reasons I got the C-Pro.

 

With Link running, you can run other fan profiles from H80i v2 Temp, GPU temp, any of the temp probes, or a multitude of other choices. With Link closed, the H80i v2 will still follow the saved to device fan profile with coolant temp and the H55 can still follow the temp probe. This would appear to be a solution and likely enhancement of your current motherboard capabilities where control variable choice is often lacking.

 

 

That is indeed how i have it running now except with a hardware fancontroller in the 5.25 bay instead of the CoPro.

Currently i disable the fans on the H55 and somtimes forget to turn them back on when i start gaming resulting in an loud alarm from the controller when the temp sensor on the H55 reaches 60C.

 

The idea was to move the H80i v2 to the GPU (and upgrade the CPU cooler) since it has an build in temp sensor and hoped that the CoPro could read that data without Link running. Because the CoPro supports Zero RPM mode and the build in controller in the H80i v2 does not. So that the fans would automaticly turn on once a certain liquid temp is reached.

When an idea is simply not possible, atleast at this time, it is time to look for other ideas.

 

Guess i could still use the CoPro for all other case fans have the H80i v2 run its own curve. Having 2 fans more or less running or not would not make much of a difference i guess.

 

PC's are like houses, they are never done:laughing:

 

Hope this made it a bit more clear.

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The idea was to move the H80i v2 to the GPU (and upgrade the CPU cooler) since it has an build in temp sensor and hoped that the CoPro could read that data without Link running. Because the CoPro supports Zero RPM mode and the build in controller in the H80i v2 does not. So that the fans would automaticly turn on once a certain liquid temp is reached.

When an idea is simply not possible, atleast at this time, it is time to look for other ideas.

 

OK, I missed that part but I am not sure how it makes this impossible. You might not be able to do zero rpm from H80i v2 temp, but you could set the first point at the bare minimum up to say coolant temp of 27-30C (can adjust seasonally), then have it progress to a normal level. On most 120mm PWM fans, that is something like 400 rpm. That would ensure a very quiet desktop levels and productive fan speeds for the higher temps you see. On a 120mm cooler, you probably run a large range from down near 20C with minimal GPU activity up to near 50C on big AAA titles. That is a lot of range to work with.

 

Option 2 would be continue what you're doing with a temp probe on the exhaust of the H80i v2. Ignore the coolant temp and use the temp probe data. It should be the same (0 to -1C). With the fans on the C-Pro, you can do your zero flatline up to 27C or whatever, then have it kick on with your favored temp points. I do not like zero rpm settings and prefer the minimum, but I am essentially doing this now with two pumps and two 280mm radiators in all water system. Ironically, the 280mm on the GPU means my range is much smaller (25-35C), but it is still the same principle.

Edited by c-attack
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OK, I missed that part but I am not sure how it makes this impossible. You might not be able to do zero rpm from H80i v2 temp, but you could set the first point at the bare minimum up to say coolant temp of 27-30C (can adjust seasonally), then have it progress to a normal level. On most 120mm PWM fans, that is something like 400 rpm. That would ensure a very quiet desktop levels and productive fan speeds for the higher temps you see. On a 120mm cooler, you probably run a large range from down near 20C with minimal GPU activity up to near 50C on big AAA titles. That is a lot of range to work with.

 

Option 2 would be continue what you're doing with a temp probe on the exhaust of the H80i v2. Ignore the coolant temp and use the temp probe data. It should be the same (0 to -1C). With the fans on the C-Pro, you can do your zero flatline up to 27C or whatever, then have it kick on with your favored temp points. I do not like zero rpm settings and prefer the minimum, but I am essentially doing this now with two pumps and two 280mm radiators in all water system. Ironically, the 280mm on the GPU means my range is much smaller (25-35C), but it is still the same principle.

 

I haven't looked into the development of fans recently, current intake and radiator fans are all SP120's from 2013.

And when used with an Y splitter they wont go lower as 840 rpm. And that is already pretty quiet, but with 10 fans that does add up. In comparison my 3 WD HDD's are louder when they come out of sleep.

Having the fans go as low as 400-500 rpm would reduce the sound enough to not have zero rpm mode i think. As long as they have decent static presure.

Currently my GPU temp is between 50 and 60C with a rad temp of around 37C (under full load offcours) depending a bit on how dirty the dustfilter is getting with the lowest fan setting of 840rpm. I imagine that the temps with an H80i v2 would go down a bit, or the same with less airflow needed since its almost twice as thick.

Idle temps are 2C over room temp 22C

 

Sometimes you have an idea and see it in a certain way how to achieve that. Having other people see it with a different perspective achieving the same goal you were after is great.

So thank you for your ideas.

I'll be doing some research on the current fans to see their specs in this day and age.

Thanks again

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Yeah, most DC fans will have comparatively high minimum run speeds compared to new PWM models. Popular radiator choices like the above ML series or Noctua Industrial run as low as 400 and are inaudible at more than 6 inches at low speeds. I mostly don't like zero fan modes because they often allow temperatures to build too quickly before coming on like a freight train trying to halt the advance. There is another issue to be wary of, if you decrease your noise floor to very low levels. Something will always be the "noisiest thing in your case". Most people are pretty tolerant of the sound a fan makes it is broad spectrum, diffuse noise. Things like HDD click and pump hum are not. I tell people this all the time, but nevertheless forget my own advice on occasion. Quite often I will bump up the idle fan speed for quiet desktop work to cover over those kinds of devices.

 

Regardless, those are all things for experimentation down the road. For now, know the C-Pro can give you the options above and I have done it with both AIO and custom loop components. It is a handy little device and I kept it in even when I had zero other Corsair devices connected to it, just for the temp probe control on the GPU radiator.

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If the noise is your key driver for this, take a look at the ML series of fans. They are super-quiet and perform very, very well on a radiator. You can even get a dual pack: https://www.amazon.com/Corsair-Premium-Magnetic-Levitation-CO-9050040-WW/dp/B01G5I6MRK/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1523132078&sr=8-1&keywords=ML-120&th=1.

 

Thanks for the link, will be looking into these for the rads.

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Yeah, most DC fans will have comparatively high minimum run speeds compared to new PWM models. Popular radiator choices like the above ML series or Noctua Industrial run as low as 400 and are inaudible at more than 6 inches at low speeds. I mostly don't like zero fan modes because they often allow temperatures to build too quickly before coming on like a freight train trying to halt the advance. There is another issue to be wary of, if you decrease your noise floor to very low levels. Something will always be the "noisiest thing in your case". Most people are pretty tolerant of the sound a fan makes it is broad spectrum, diffuse noise. Things like HDD click and pump hum are not. I tell people this all the time, but nevertheless forget my own advice on occasion. Quite often I will bump up the idle fan speed for quiet desktop work to cover over those kinds of devices.

 

Regardless, those are all things for experimentation down the road. For now, know the C-Pro can give you the options above and I have done it with both AIO and custom loop components. It is a handy little device and I kept it in even when I had zero other Corsair devices connected to it, just for the temp probe control on the GPU radiator.

 

Yeah i had no idea they could go that low now. Back when i cut open my case to fit more fans and radiators i went with the AF120's and SP120's since those were the thing back then.

And when changing out all the fans the cost does add up. So i thought i do some research and get some info from others with more experience, swap the fans and controller in the current build so i can compare the noise and performance when i reuse them in a new build. So just in case the temps are higher in the new build i already know it is not the cooler or the fans.

(kept swapping coolers and fans for over 2 years in this build before temps and noise were to my liking, not making that mistake again)

 

I do agree on having the fans at low rpm at all times instead of turning them off and then cooling them down with high rpm and start over.

But in case of the GPU in my case, i can leave the fans off all day when not gaming. Just the airflow in the case around the rad is enough to keep the GPU around 35C idle, which is already 15C lower than with the stock cooler of the card (that had by default also an zero rpm mode until 60C, which is way to high in my opinion but that is a different matter)

 

And indeed unless you go full passive cooling with ssd's only something will always make some noise.

 

Got alot of new info and perspectives from this all so thanks for that.

Think i go get an CoPro first to mess around with that a bit, and then go look for some current generation fans.

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