Jump to content
Corsair Community

Turning off QFan Control causes issues in Corsair Link


miniviking10
 Share

Recommended Posts

So I found out that if you have an H80i V2 water cooler, you need to turn off "Q Fan Control" for the CPU in the motherboard settings to allow the cooler to run at the full 12V and also let me see the Fan RPM (it would previously say 0 RPM) speeds in Corsair Link.

 

OK, I can confirm that turning off QFan Control does prove to show my fan RPM for the cooler. However, my fan speeds are very strange now. For example, when using Balanced profile and I load my CPU with Prime95 for 20 minutes, and then shut down Prime95, my fans continue to run at high speeds (between 1800 RPM and 2100 RPM) WELL after I stopped stressing my CPU. That's no good.

 

Other weird things I've noticed, "Quiet" mode runs weird...it'll certainly be quiet, but then once I actually do something such as open a browser, I'll hear the fans ramp up really quick for just a few seconds.

 

I'm not having issues with CPU temps, it's just that I'm trying all kinds of things to tone down my fan speeds, while making sure they ramp up when needed, and then they SLOW down when not needed. This Corsair Link doesn't seem to work very well or there's something wrong with how I have the settings. I've turned Q Fan Control back on for now and now my fans seem to function normally again. What's the deal?

 

CPU: i5-4690k

Motherboard: Asus Z97-E/USB3.1

Graphics Card: R9 Fury Nitro 4GB HBM

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Turn off QFan Control for that header. Now. Do not pass Go. Do not collect $200. Go straight to your BIOS and turn it off. And leave it off.

You will damage your pump if you do not give it the full 12V. Turning off QFan control ensures that the cooler is getting a full 12V of power at all times. The fan header does not control the fan speeds and has no impact at all on the fan speeds.

You aren't seeing the fans go because the cooler isn't getting enough power to run them. And that's not good.

Once you do that ...

Go back to Link. Set your fan speeds to be based on the H80i V2 temperature. This is the coolant temperature and it's the coolant that the fans actually cool, not the CPU. The coolant cools the CPU ... so if you keep the coolant cool, the CPU will stay cooler. It sounds like your Balanced profile is set to use the coolant temperature as the source ... so what you are describing is normal. Watch the temperature of the coolant as you do your testing. It will rise slowly ... and fall slowly. This is normal and expected behavior. The coolant has a higher specific heat than air or the CPU ... it holds more heat and it takes more for it to both warm up and cool down.

Your Quiet mode sounds like it has the fan speeds tied to CPU temperature. Change that to have them based on the coolant temperature and you'll see far less "jumpy" fans.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Turn off QFan Control for that header. Now. Do not pass Go. Do not collect $200. Go straight to your BIOS and turn it off. And leave it off.

You will damage your pump if you do not give it the full 12V. Turning off QFan control ensures that the cooler is getting a full 12V of power at all times. The fan header does not control the fan speeds and has no impact at all on the fan speeds.

You aren't seeing the fans go because the cooler isn't getting enough power to run them. And that's not good.

Once you do that ...

Go back to Link. Set your fan speeds to be based on the H80i V2 temperature. This is the coolant temperature and it's the coolant that the fans actually cool, not the CPU. The coolant cools the CPU ... so if you keep the coolant cool, the CPU will stay cooler. It sounds like your Balanced profile is set to use the coolant temperature as the source ... so what you are describing is normal. Watch the temperature of the coolant as you do your testing. It will rise slowly ... and fall slowly. This is normal and expected behavior. The coolant has a higher specific heat than air or the CPU ... it holds more heat and it takes more for it to both warm up and cool down.

Your Quiet mode sounds like it has the fan speeds tied to CPU temperature. Change that to have them based on the coolant temperature and you'll see far less "jumpy" fans.

 

Bare with me as I comment this while at work right now and not in front of my PC.. :biggrin: And thank you for the quick response, I really appreciate that!

 

I'm definitely learning a lot more about this. I DID turn off QFan Control and some more more testing last night. I turned it to Quiet mode again, turned on stress testing, and I did notice exactly what you're saying - the fan RPM increases SLOWLY and decreases SLOWLY.

 

My confusion - Everything you're saying is making sense..except I don't know what you mean exactly by "Set your fan speeds to be based on the H80i V2 temperature." in Corsair Link. Is this where you change the "Mode" OR "Group" after clicking on the fan? I know "Mode" gives you a few options like Quiet, Balanced, and Performance, but I don't remember it giving an option based on coolant temperature. Under "Group" though, I think it already said "H80i v2 Temp" and not something like "CPU Temperature". I'll need to double check when I get back home.

 

And a side question, is it safe to run using "Quiet" mode when I have my processor overclocked to 4.5? The reason I ask is because in my final stress tests, the exhaust fans are significantly quieter than when I had QFan control on. Based on what you're saying, this is a good thing and how the coolers should be operating. But it doesn't seem to be cooling my CPU as well as before (highest temp in 20 minutes now reaches up to 76 degrees), so I assume I'll need to tinker with my overclock/voltage settings if I want to use Quiet mode efficiently.

 

Again I appreciate your help..which I had a bitcoin to send you.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bare with me as I comment this while at work right now and not in front of my PC.. :biggrin: And thank you for the quick response, I really appreciate that!

 

I'm definitely learning a lot more about this. I DID turn off QFan Control and some more more testing last night. I turned it to Quiet mode again, turned on stress testing, and I did notice exactly what you're saying - the fan RPM increases SLOWLY and decreases SLOWLY.

 

My confusion - Everything you're saying is making sense..except I don't know what you mean exactly by "Set your fan speeds to be based on the H80i V2 temperature." in Corsair Link. Is this where you change the "Mode" OR "Group" after clicking on the fan? I know "Mode" gives you a few options like Quiet, Balanced, and Performance, but I don't remember it giving an option based on coolant temperature. Under "Group" though, I think it already said "H80i v2 Temp" and not something like "CPU Temperature". I'll need to double check when I get back home.

Yup, it's labelled "Group". That's the source for the temperature.

And a side question, is it safe to run using "Quiet" mode when I have my processor overclocked to 4.5? The reason I ask is because in my final stress tests, the exhaust fans are significantly quieter than when I had QFan control on. Based on what you're saying, this is a good thing and how the coolers should be operating. But it doesn't seem to be cooling my CPU as well as before (highest temp in 20 minutes now reaches up to 76 degrees), so I assume I'll need to tinker with my overclock/voltage settings if I want to use Quiet mode efficiently.

 

Again I appreciate your help..which I had a bitcoin to send you.

 

Is it safe? Probably. Hard to say because there's a bunch of different factors. But you're testing it so that's good. Don't let the temps get to high and you'll be good.

 

Now ... how it works. The CPU is cooled by the liquid coolant being pumped through the system. The cooler that coolant is, the cooler your CPU can be. The warmer the coolant, the warmer the CPU. The fans blow cooler air through the radiator fins and allow the coolant to radiate waste heat. So the coolant can only be as cool as the air blowing through the radiator fins. The warmer the air, the warmer the coolant. Here's where the fan profiles come in ... higher fan speeds blow more cool air through the radiator fins, allowing it to cool a bit more. So ... in Quiet profile, your coolant will get a bit warmer than in Performance or Balanced. How much warmer will depend on the ambient temperature of the air blowing through the radiator ... if you're set up as exhaust then that'll be the internal case temperature. This does heat up under use as well, particularly from the GPU while gaming. While load testing, don't just watch your CPU temperatures ... watch the coolant temperature as well.

 

It's a whole interrelated system. For testing overall thermal performance, I, personally, prefer ROG RealBench over Prime95. Prime95 only stresses the CPU ... and it does things that very, very few applications actually do that puts additional stress on the processor (specifically, AVX). RealBench stresses both the CPU (using Handbrake) and the GPU at the same time, producing a full load of heat in the system. It's more stressful than any game will be but if you've got good temps with RealBench, you'll very likely be good at whatever you throw at the system.

 

If the noise bothers you (and those stock fans are LOUD), take a look at the ML series fans. Excellent fans for radiators and VERY quiet, especially when compared to the stock fans. I'm a big fan of 'em.

 

And I appreciate the sentiment about the Bitcoin ... no need though. Just learn and, when the time comes, share what you've learned with others. ;):

  • Confused 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yup, it's labelled "Group". That's the source for the temperature.

 

 

Is it safe? Probably. Hard to say because there's a bunch of different factors. But you're testing it so that's good. Don't let the temps get to high and you'll be good.

 

Now ... how it works. The CPU is cooled by the liquid coolant being pumped through the system. The cooler that coolant is, the cooler your CPU can be. The warmer the coolant, the warmer the CPU. The fans blow cooler air through the radiator fins and allow the coolant to radiate waste heat. So the coolant can only be as cool as the air blowing through the radiator fins. The warmer the air, the warmer the coolant. Here's where the fan profiles come in ... higher fan speeds blow more cool air through the radiator fins, allowing it to cool a bit more. So ... in Quiet profile, your coolant will get a bit warmer than in Performance or Balanced. How much warmer will depend on the ambient temperature of the air blowing through the radiator ... if you're set up as exhaust then that'll be the internal case temperature. This does heat up under use as well, particularly from the GPU while gaming. While load testing, don't just watch your CPU temperatures ... watch the coolant temperature as well.

 

It's a whole interrelated system. For testing overall thermal performance, I, personally, prefer ROG RealBench over Prime95. Prime95 only stresses the CPU ... and it does things that very, very few applications actually do that puts additional stress on the processor (specifically, AVX). RealBench stresses both the CPU (using Handbrake) and the GPU at the same time, producing a full load of heat in the system. It's more stressful than any game will be but if you've got good temps with RealBench, you'll very likely be good at whatever you throw at the system.

 

If the noise bothers you (and those stock fans are LOUD), take a look at the ML series fans. Excellent fans for radiators and VERY quiet, especially when compared to the stock fans. I'm a big fan of 'em.

 

And I appreciate the sentiment about the Bitcoin ... no need though. Just learn and, when the time comes, share what you've learned with others. ;):

Do you work for Corsair? Great explanation. When I get home, I'll check both the Quiet and Balanced profiles to see if they're using the correct Group for the coolant temperature. I do have the fans set up as exhaust (btw, my case is a Corsair 460x) out the back, with 3 intake fans in the front, and one extra fan blowing out the top which I doubt is doing much with that magnetic filter on top of the case blocking it. You have a point about the ambient temp inside the case, because my GPU is massive and gets pretty hot (Nitro R9 Fury), with it reaching 75 C in gaming, so that is probably contributing a lot of heat to the coolant temp. I'll try ROG RealBench and see if I can get it to cool efficiently with less noise. And you are so so correct, these stock fans are definitely noisier than I was expecting so maybe down the road I'll have to consider other options. Thanks much..hopefully I didn't cause too much permanent damage to my pump!

Edited by miniviking10
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Do you work for Corsair? Great explanation.

Thanks ... and no, I don't. But I'll take that as a compliment.

When I get home, I'll check both the Quiet and Balanced profiles to see if they're using the correct Group for the coolant temperature. I do have the fans set up as exhaust (btw, my case is a Corsair 460x) out the back, with 3 intake fans in the front, and one extra fan blowing out the top which I doubt is doing much with that magnetic filter on top of the case blocking it.

It may be doing more than you realize. Ever put your hand over it during gaming? I would suspect is helping exhaust some of the heat from that R9 Fury.

You have a point about the ambient temp inside the case, because my GPU is massive and gets pretty hot (Nitro R9 Fury), with it reaching 75 C in gaming, so that is probably contributing a lot of heat to the coolant temp. I'll try ROG RealBench and see if I can get it to cool efficiently with less noise. And you are so so correct, these stock fans are definitely noisier than I was expecting so maybe down the road I'll have to consider other options. Thanks much..hopefully I didn't cause too much permanent damage to my pump!

Yeah, that GPU will heat things up. That's going to be the main thing that you need to deal with. It sounds like you have good intake though, so that's good.

The new coolers that are coming out any day now (we hope) and that some folks have their grubby paws on already are coming with ML series fans. The stock fans are good and they do a really good job but also bear a striking resemblance to a jet engine.

And yes, let's hope that you didn't cause any damage to the pump. Just in case, I keep a spare air cooler handy all the time. But ... I also have 4 liquid cooled systems in the house.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The new coolers that are coming out any day now (we hope) and that some folks have their grubby paws on already are coming with ML series fans. The stock fans are good and they do a really good job but also bear a striking resemblance to a jet engine.

 

Hmm... That is interesting, and possibly depressing since I just bought an H110i for my new Z370 build, and I am about to buy ML fans to replace the stock ones. I would like to check out the Dual Light Loop fans but alas, I will pass as I do not intend to run Link and do not want to depend on software controlled LEDs. Not worth it to me.

 

Oh well. I guess I could send it back - depends on the price difference. Then again, any new Corsair cooler probably has an Asetek pump and I definitely want a CoolIt pump so I will probably stick with what I bought (an installed already).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks ... and no, I don't. But I'll take that as a compliment.

 

It may be doing more than you realize. Ever put your hand over it during gaming? I would suspect is helping exhaust some of the heat from that R9 Fury.

 

Yeah, that GPU will heat things up. That's going to be the main thing that you need to deal with. It sounds like you have good intake though, so that's good.

The new coolers that are coming out any day now (we hope) and that some folks have their grubby paws on already are coming with ML series fans. The stock fans are good and they do a really good job but also bear a striking resemblance to a jet engine.

And yes, let's hope that you didn't cause any damage to the pump. Just in case, I keep a spare air cooler handy all the time. But ... I also have 4 liquid cooled systems in the house.

So I've done some ROG Benchmark stress tests, as well as played Assassin's Creed Origins and benched on there, and whether I have it set to Quiet or Balanced, my coolant temperature eventually reaches 40.0 C and the fans ramp all the way up to 2700 RPM and the noise becomes unbearable. I understand that you can set your own curve, but I don't know how to set it up so it never reaches the max RPM. I think my graphics card might be too hot for this entire set up and there's too much heat circulating inside. I think I might uninstall this cooler and put the Evo 212 back on and see what happens.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So I've done some ROG Benchmark stress tests, as well as played Assassin's Creed Origins and benched on there, and whether I have it set to Quiet or Balanced, my coolant temperature eventually reaches 40.0 C and the fans ramp all the way up to 2700 RPM and the noise becomes unbearable. I understand that you can set your own curve, but I don't know how to set it up so it never reaches the max RPM. I think my graphics card might be too hot for this entire set up and there's too much heat circulating inside. I think I might uninstall this cooler and put the Evo 212 back on and see what happens.

Well, the custom fan curves are based on the PWM duty cycle ... so percentages. You can absolutely set the max percentage to something that's bearable. The Quiet and Balanced profiles both do that; it sounds like you are running the "Performance" profile.

I doubt the EVO 212 will be any better ... it's using the warm air inside your case to try to cool the CPU.

What's your max CPU temperature?

Do you have any idea of the internal case temperature? And what temperature are your case fans using for their speed? Ideally, they should use the internal case temperature and the curve will have a lower "upper" temperature than you would have if it were based on CPU.

For example, in my system, I have my case fan curves tied to the ambient temperature just above my GPU (GTX 1070) and I have them balanced to keep the case temperature under 40C, even at full load. This keeps my coolant under 40C as well ... though I am working with a larger cooler.

You can also try disconnecting the top exhaust ... though I highly doubt that this will improve anything.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, the custom fan curves are based on the PWM duty cycle ... so percentages. You can absolutely set the max percentage to something that's bearable. The Quiet and Balanced profiles both do that; it sounds like you are running the "Performance" profile.

I doubt the EVO 212 will be any better ... it's using the warm air inside your case to try to cool the CPU.

What's your max CPU temperature?

Do you have any idea of the internal case temperature? And what temperature are your case fans using for their speed? Ideally, they should use the internal case temperature and the curve will have a lower "upper" temperature than you would have if it were based on CPU.

For example, in my system, I have my case fan curves tied to the ambient temperature just above my GPU (GTX 1070) and I have them balanced to keep the case temperature under 40C, even at full load. This keeps my coolant under 40C as well ... though I am working with a larger cooler.

You can also try disconnecting the top exhaust ... though I highly doubt that this will improve anything.

 

Well I did make sure I selected Quiet and Balanced when I wanted to try them. The Balanced options says once the coolant temp hits 40.0 C, the fans should be running at 80%, not the full 100% (2700 RPM)? Doesn't this nullify the point of the profile? Sorry if I'm confused.

 

I installed the Evo 212 (also put in another case fan at the top) and you're right, it's not cooling as well as the H80i V2 -- at 4.5 GHz OC, my temps were reaching up to 79 degrees, whereas before it might hit 71 degrees at most under load. That said, the Evo 212 fan is A LOT more quiet under load. So I turned my OC down to 4.3 GHz and adjusted the voltage and it's hitting 76 degrees on Prime95 Small FFTs, and 74 degrees on the ROG RealBench. It's still warmer than I'd like, so I'll need to see if I can lower the voltage just a tad bit more! Like you were telling me, it's probable there's too much heat circulating inside which is why the Evo 212 isn't cooling as well as it should.

 

What's your max CPU temperature?

 

The CPU w/ H80i V2 was reaching low 70s in stress tests.

 

Do you have any idea of the internal case temperature? And what temperature are your case fans using for their speed? Ideally, they should use the internal case temperature and the curve will have a lower "upper" temperature than you would have if it were based on CPU.

 

In idle with the H80i v2, the internal case temp was around 33 C, but it would reach between 45 and 55 inside the case under load.

 

I don't remember the temperature my case fans were set for and now I'm not sure what to use without Corsair Link installed. I didn't realize you could even control the case fan speeds because I'm an idiot.

 

And yea, I tried taking off the top exhaust filter but it didn't improve anything. I tried several different fan curves but again, the temps were easily hitting 40 degrees C. Do you think the Corsair RX 460 case is good for circulating heat? I have 5 case fans installed now, including the exhaust fan now with the Evo 212, but I'm kinda ticked I'm still needing to tone down my OC to keep it under safe temps. But I'll live with it because the fan doesn't bother me.

 

BTW, Here's my build a while back before I bought the case and liquid cooler): https://pcpartpicker.com/b/zBD2FT

 

P.S. I played AC: Origins with the Evo 212 last night for over an hour and CPU temps reached 67 degrees max. I know it's not a long enough gaming session, but it's something to go off. That game utilized the CPU at 99-100% all the time!!

Edited by miniviking10
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well I did make sure I selected Quiet and Balanced when I wanted to try them. The Balanced options says once the coolant temp hits 40.0 C, the fans should be running at 80%, not the full 100% (2700 RPM)? Doesn't this nullify the point of the profile? Sorry if I'm confused.

I'm not sure I understand the question. For Balanced and Quiet, they use different priorities ... essentially. Performance will crank up to 100%. Those don't ... to "Balance" noise and performance and to prefer a "Quiet" cooler over performance.

I installed the Evo 212 (also put in another case fan at the top) and you're right, it's not cooling as well as the H80i V2 -- at 4.5 GHz OC, my temps were reaching up to 79 degrees, whereas before it might hit 71 degrees at most under load. That said, the Evo 212 fan is A LOT more quiet under load. So I turned my OC down to 4.3 GHz and adjusted the voltage and it's hitting 76 degrees on Prime95 Small FFTs, and 74 degrees on the ROG RealBench. It's still warmer than I'd like, so I'll need to see if I can lower the voltage just a tad bit more! Like you were telling me, it's probable there's too much heat circulating inside which is why the Evo 212 isn't cooling as well as it should.

The CPU w/ H80i V2 was reaching low 70s in stress tests.

Those are pretty good temps.

 

In idle with the H80i v2, the internal case temp was around 33 C, but it would reach between 45 and 55 inside the case under load.

And this, my friend, is the problem. If the air being used to cool the coolant is that warm, the coolant won't get any cooler. In fact, if the coolant is less than 45-55C, it will get warmed up. Which could be exactly what you are seeing. Physics ... can't get around it.

 

I don't remember the temperature my case fans were set for and now I'm not sure what to use without Corsair Link installed. I didn't realize you could even control the case fan speeds because I'm an idiot.

I wouldn't say that you're an idiot. Not yet at least. ;): You'd control your case fans through your motherboard ... usually the BIOS. If you have a Commander Pro, you can use Link to control the speeds.

 

And yea, I tried taking off the top exhaust filter but it didn't improve anything. I tried several different fan curves but again, the temps were easily hitting 40 degrees C. Do you think the Corsair RX 460 case is good for circulating heat? I have 5 case fans installed now, including the exhaust fan now with the Evo 212, but I'm kinda ticked I'm still needing to tone down my OC to keep it under safe temps. But I'll live with it because the fan doesn't bother me.

Didn't think it would but I always like to verify my assumptions with experimental data. I don't know about the RX 460 and air-circulation specifically; it looks like it should be fine. Honestly, the problem is, I think, that R9 Fury. They are known to run hot ... and that hot has to go somewhere. If your intake and exhaust fans aren't running at full blast, they probably should be. You should look at the curves for them and see if you can tie them to the internal case temperature. And have them going full by the time your case hits 40C.

 

BTW, Here's my build a while back before I bought the case and liquid cooler): https://pcpartpicker.com/b/zBD2FT

 

P.S. I played AC: Origins with the Evo 212 last night for over an hour and CPU temps reached 67 degrees max. I know it's not a long enough gaming session, but it's something to go off. That game utilized the CPU at 99-100% all the time!!

Nice build! Now ... let's see if we can get those case temps down. I think we've pretty much nailed what the issue is with your coolant temps (and therefore fan speeds) ... it's the internal case temperature.

Now ... you can also set a custom fan curve for the H80 where the fans don't max out until ... 50 or 60c.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not sure I understand the question. For Balanced and Quiet, they use different priorities ... essentially. Performance will crank up to 100%. Those don't ... to "Balance" noise and performance and to prefer a "Quiet" cooler over performance.

 

Those are pretty good temps.

 

 

And this, my friend, is the problem. If the air being used to cool the coolant is that warm, the coolant won't get any cooler. In fact, if the coolant is less than 45-55C, it will get warmed up. Which could be exactly what you are seeing. Physics ... can't get around it.

 

 

I wouldn't say that you're an idiot. Not yet at least. ;): You'd control your case fans through your motherboard ... usually the BIOS. If you have a Commander Pro, you can use Link to control the speeds.

 

 

Didn't think it would but I always like to verify my assumptions with experimental data. I don't know about the RX 460 and air-circulation specifically; it looks like it should be fine. Honestly, the problem is, I think, that R9 Fury. They are known to run hot ... and that hot has to go somewhere. If your intake and exhaust fans aren't running at full blast, they probably should be. You should look at the curves for them and see if you can tie them to the internal case temperature. And have them going full by the time your case hits 40C.

 

 

Nice build! Now ... let's see if we can get those case temps down. I think we've pretty much nailed what the issue is with your coolant temps (and therefore fan speeds) ... it's the internal case temperature.

Now ... you can also set a custom fan curve for the H80 where the fans don't max out until ... 50 or 60c.

 

Yea, it's definitely the internal case temps. The GPU hits 75 degrees and that generates too much heat inside. I'm going to contemplate keeping the liquid cooler and buying new Corsair SP120 fans to replace the stock ones (they are simply too loud) and then reinstalling (UGH) down the road.

 

But FIRST, I'm going to see if I can crank the GPU's fan profile to reduce heat. If I can get it to reduce to even 70 degrees max, I think it'll have a big effect on the internal case temp. If not, I might need to sell it and buy a different one.

 

This is great stuff man, I really appreciate your expertise and knowledge. It's good to know it's not always just the CPU temp to look at.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Is this all in the 460X? There are some cases where this is a constant problem, but I don't recall any total system heat issues with that one. GPU waste heat does seem the likely root cause.

 

Where is the H80i v2 mounted? Rear exhaust above the GPU? That would explain a lot. You might need to experiment with an alternative location.

 

Hold off the on SP120. Yes, the stock fans are loud, but the proposed replacement will not significantly alter your temps or the tone.

Edited by c-attack
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Corsair Employees

I've run into issues with heat buildup inside cases before. My current Air 240 build and the 460X build I have down in the lab both have to deal with balancing intake and exhaust. It's not that the cases are poorly designed - far from it - but my Air 240 build has a Hydro 1080 Ti with the radiator mounted in the only place I can put it: in the front. So that 300W of 1080 Ti heat spews back into the chassis.

 

That R9 Fury is going to be cranking a lot of heat into a 460X, the ideal solution is to add two 140mm fans to the top of the case as exhausts to help evacuate that waste heat. That should bring down temperatures across the board.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Is this all in the 460X? There are some cases where this is a constant problem, but I don't recall any total system heat issues with that one. GPU waste heat does seem the likely root cause.

 

Where is the H80i v2 mounted? Rear exhaust above the GPU? That would explain a lot. You might need to experiment with an alternative location.

 

Hold off the on SP120. Yes, the stock fans are loud, but the proposed replacement will not significantly alter your temps or the tone.

 

I had it mounted as an exhaust with both fans/radiator out the back of the case. And yea, it's right above the GPU.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yea, it's definitely the internal case temps. The GPU hits 75 degrees and that generates too much heat inside. I'm going to contemplate keeping the liquid cooler and buying new Corsair SP120 fans to replace the stock ones (they are simply too loud) and then reinstalling (UGH) down the road.

A word of warning: you won't be able to control the SP fans with the onboard controller on the cooler. The cooler will only control 4-pin/PWM fans and the SPs are 3-pin/DC fans. If you want performance and a better noise profile, look at the ML fans. You can get the 2 pack without LEDs.

But FIRST, I'm going to see if I can crank the GPU's fan profile to reduce heat. If I can get it to reduce to even 70 degrees max, I think it'll have a big effect on the internal case temp. If not, I might need to sell it and buy a different one.

Let's see if we can get that heat out of the case. Corsair Dustin mentioned better exhaust ... we can also see if we can crank up the intake; see what you can do about the intake fan curves in the BIOS. Cool air in ... hot air out.

This is great stuff man, I really appreciate your expertise and knowledge. It's good to know it's not always just the CPU temp to look at.

Glad I could help.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've run into issues with heat buildup inside cases before. My current Air 240 build and the 460X build I have down in the lab both have to deal with balancing intake and exhaust. It's not that the cases are poorly designed - far from it - but my Air 240 build has a Hydro 1080 Ti with the radiator mounted in the only place I can put it: in the front. So that 300W of 1080 Ti heat spews back into the chassis.

 

That R9 Fury is going to be cranking a lot of heat into a 460X, the ideal solution is to add two 140mm fans to the top of the case as exhausts to help evacuate that waste heat. That should bring down temperatures across the board.

 

Well currently I have the two 120mm fans already installed at the top of the case. Are they not good enough? Having one top fan installed before didn't seem to be enough to prevent the cooler from running at full blast because the internal temps were still hitting 40.0 C and higher. Maybe having that second one now will help? Are the 140mm fans that much better?

 

I will add this and take with a grain of salt as I actually haven't yet monitored my case fan speeds but -- Right now with the Evo 212 installed, both top fans probably aren't running at full speeds, because now I have two top fans and the exhaust fan connected to a 1:3 PWM splitter to attach to one CHA_FAN header on the mb. I don't have much choice because I already have two of the intake fans connected via another 1:2 PWM splitter, and the third intake fan connected to its own CHA_FAN header. My motherboard only has so many fan headers.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A word of warning: you won't be able to control the SP fans with the onboard controller on the cooler. The cooler will only control 4-pin/PWM fans and the SPs are 3-pin/DC fans. If you want performance and a better noise profile, look at the ML fans. You can get the 2 pack without LEDs.

 

Would these work? https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835181106&cm_re=corsair_ml120-_-35-181-106-_-Product

 

Let's see if we can get that heat out of the case. Corsair Dustin mentioned better exhaust ... we can also see if we can crank up the intake; see what you can do about the intake fan curves in the BIOS. Cool air in ... hot air out.

 

I'll give this a try before reinstalling the liquid cooler. I mentioned in a previous post, two of my intake fans are connected on a 1:2 PWM splitter, while the other is connected on a chassis header on its own. Hopefully it won't be too difficult getting them to run faster.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Is this all in the 460X? There are some cases where this is a constant problem, but I don't recall any total system heat issues with that one. GPU waste heat does seem the likely root cause.

 

Where is the H80i v2 mounted? Rear exhaust above the GPU? That would explain a lot. You might need to experiment with an alternative location.

 

Hold off the on SP120. Yes, the stock fans are loud, but the proposed replacement will not significantly alter your temps or the tone.

 

Btw, I don't know that I'll be able install the radiator anywhere else in the case. If I remember correctly, the cables are too stiff and close to be able to maneuver it in a way to get it installed out the top. Like there isn't enough room to do it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yup, they're the ones.

 

I'll give this a try before reinstalling the liquid cooler. I mentioned in a previous post, two of my intake fans are connected on a 1:2 PWM splitter, while the other is connected on a chassis header on its own. Hopefully it won't be too difficult getting them to run faster.

Yeah. You're gonna need to do something about the heat in the case, one way or another. And, in your case, you may need to do a custom curve that maxes out at a higher temperature simply because of your environmental factors.

Doesn't the room where you have the system get warm too?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The ML fans are an upgrade on the stock model and I would change them to that even if you had no issues. It it a smoother more pleasant sound, although nothing is particularly ear friendly at 1800 rpm+. I also think that is not likely going to have much impact on your current issue. If you run a CPU only stress test, I would expect to see a coolant delta of around 6-8C on H80i v2 and a 4690K. The difference between a very mediocre set of fans and very good ones might be 2C. That means you can only reduce coolant and CPU by 2C. The Sp120L fans are loud, but they are not poor performers. The real gains to be had are in product enjoyment and sound.

 

The really big problem is the GPU is heating the surrounding area. Normal enough and all GPUs do this. However, the R9 appears to one of those that is super hot and I certainly remember having lots of difficulty sorting out user complaints with coolant temperature when the 980 Ti launched. Your problem is twofold. First, the proximity to the GPU is a problem. Obviously right above the top of the GPU is a warm spot and I don't suggest you stick your finger between the backplate and bottom of the radiator. Regardless, you are heating the bottom like its over a fire. The second issue is the exhaust flow through the H80i. No matter what you do with the fans, a 49mm thick radiator is a massive impediment to exhaust flow. You just can't move a lot of air through it and those SP120Ls at 2700 rpm will move less air through that opening than a AF140 lazily spinning at 700 rpm. Furthermore, the air that is going though the radiator is going to the same as the case ambient or local air above the GPU. The air is hot too and that makes the coolant hot. Heat travels both ways across those fins. You are heating up the coolant more than it would be if the load was CPU alone.

 

The clear way to try and address this is to move the H80i v2 to a different location. I know it is a natural fit in the rear exhaust, but this doesn't seem to be working when paired with this GPU. It's too big for the top and my suggestion is to try the top 120mm spot on the front rail. Long term there are ways to set it up with the existing SP120 RGB in front to maintain the look, but for now use both of the SP120L stock fans for a baseline comparison.

 

The cooler will now be using intake air and not GPU waste heat, its own waste heat should go out the top of the case and not combine with the GPU heat, and most importantly it frees up the rear fan slot to get some unrestricted exhaust. That fan slot is the most important for getting the hot air of out of the case. You can use the 3rd SP120-RGB front the front in the back slot for now. What fans are in the top of the case?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The ML fans are an upgrade on the stock model and I would change them to that even if you had no issues. It it a smoother more pleasant sound, although nothing is particularly ear friendly at 1800 rpm+. I also think that is not likely going to have much impact on your current issue. If you run a CPU only stress test, I would expect to see a coolant delta of around 6-8C on H80i v2 and a 4690K. The difference between a very mediocre set of fans and very good ones might be 2C. That means you can only reduce coolant and CPU by 2C. The Sp120L fans are loud, but they are not poor performers. The real gains to be had are in product enjoyment and sound.

 

The really big problem is the GPU is heating the surrounding area. Normal enough and all GPUs do this. However, the R9 appears to one of those that is super hot and I certainly remember having lots of difficulty sorting out user complaints with coolant temperature when the 980 Ti launched. Your problem is twofold. First, the proximity to the GPU is a problem. Obviously right above the top of the GPU is a warm spot and I don't suggest you stick your finger between the backplate and bottom of the radiator. Regardless, you are heating the bottom like its over a fire. The second issue is the exhaust flow through the H80i. No matter what you do with the fans, a 49mm thick radiator is a massive impediment to exhaust flow. You just can't move a lot of air through it and those SP120Ls at 2700 rpm will move less air through that opening than a AF140 lazily spinning at 700 rpm. Furthermore, the air that is going though the radiator is going to the same as the case ambient or local air above the GPU. The air is hot too and that makes the coolant hot. Heat travels both ways across those fins. You are heating up the coolant more than it would be if the load was CPU alone.

 

The clear way to try and address this is to move the H80i v2 to a different location. I know it is a natural fit in the rear exhaust, but this doesn't seem to be working when paired with this GPU. It's too big for the top and my suggestion is to try the top 120mm spot on the front rail. Long term there are ways to set it up with the existing SP120 RGB in front to maintain the look, but for now use both of the SP120L stock fans for a baseline comparison.

 

The cooler will now be using intake air and not GPU waste heat, its own waste heat should go out the top of the case and not combine with the GPU heat, and most importantly it frees up the rear fan slot to get some unrestricted exhaust. That fan slot is the most important for getting the hot air of out of the case. You can use the 3rd SP120-RGB front the front in the back slot for now. What fans are in the top of the case?

Very informational and helpful.

 

What fans are in the top of the case?

They're Thermaltake Riing 12 120mm .. https://www.bestbuy.com/site/thermaltake-riing-12-led-120mm-radiator-cooling-fan-white/4401201.p?skuId=4401201&cmp=RMX&extStoreId=1778&ref=212&loc=1&ksid=ffa37278-c04c-4ba2-b978-cb5b73e6e654&ksprof_id=8&ksaffcode=pg199200&ksdevice=c&lsft=ref:212,loc:2

 

Not the best but serviceable.

 

So what you're saying is I would set up the fans/radiator in the front as intake, and then it would be blowing the room air in through the fan and out the back/top? And you're certain the fans wouldn't need to run as fast because cooler would be running through the radiator instead of the hot internal temps? It sounds promising.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The ML fans are an upgrade on the stock model and I would change them to that even if you had no issues. It it a smoother more pleasant sound, although nothing is particularly ear friendly at 1800 rpm+. I also think that is not likely going to have much impact on your current issue. If you run a CPU only stress test, I would expect to see a coolant delta of around 6-8C on H80i v2 and a 4690K. The difference between a very mediocre set of fans and very good ones might be 2C. That means you can only reduce coolant and CPU by 2C. The Sp120L fans are loud, but they are not poor performers. The real gains to be had are in product enjoyment and sound.

 

The really big problem is the GPU is heating the surrounding area. Normal enough and all GPUs do this. However, the R9 appears to one of those that is super hot and I certainly remember having lots of difficulty sorting out user complaints with coolant temperature when the 980 Ti launched. Your problem is twofold. First, the proximity to the GPU is a problem. Obviously right above the top of the GPU is a warm spot and I don't suggest you stick your finger between the backplate and bottom of the radiator. Regardless, you are heating the bottom like its over a fire. The second issue is the exhaust flow through the H80i. No matter what you do with the fans, a 49mm thick radiator is a massive impediment to exhaust flow. You just can't move a lot of air through it and those SP120Ls at 2700 rpm will move less air through that opening than a AF140 lazily spinning at 700 rpm. Furthermore, the air that is going though the radiator is going to the same as the case ambient or local air above the GPU. The air is hot too and that makes the coolant hot. Heat travels both ways across those fins. You are heating up the coolant more than it would be if the load was CPU alone.

 

The clear way to try and address this is to move the H80i v2 to a different location. I know it is a natural fit in the rear exhaust, but this doesn't seem to be working when paired with this GPU. It's too big for the top and my suggestion is to try the top 120mm spot on the front rail. Long term there are ways to set it up with the existing SP120 RGB in front to maintain the look, but for now use both of the SP120L stock fans for a baseline comparison.

 

The cooler will now be using intake air and not GPU waste heat, its own waste heat should go out the top of the case and not combine with the GPU heat, and most importantly it frees up the rear fan slot to get some unrestricted exhaust. That fan slot is the most important for getting the hot air of out of the case. You can use the 3rd SP120-RGB front the front in the back slot for now. What fans are in the top of the case?

 

P.S., I should install everything in the front (both fans and radiator)? And is it better to install it in the top, middle, or bottom intake fan?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Corsair Employees

I think the situation is a little bit of a catch-22. I know when I ran into this on my systems I had to spend a couple of hours getting the right balance of heat and noise, tweaking the fan speeds with my Commander PRO and running stress tests.

 

That said, my original Air 240 build used HD120 RGB fans, but swapping them all to ML120s resulted in a major improvement in both noise and heat. I don't want to upsell anyone on anything - make the best of what you have - but a better fan can make a huge difference.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think the situation is a little bit of a catch-22. I know when I ran into this on my systems I had to spend a couple of hours getting the right balance of heat and noise, tweaking the fan speeds with my Commander PRO and running stress tests.

 

That said, my original Air 240 build used HD120 RGB fans, but swapping them all to ML120s resulted in a major improvement in both noise and heat. I don't want to upsell anyone on anything - make the best of what you have - but a better fan can make a huge difference.

 

I should have done more research on the GPU and if I had known its temps would disrupt the cooling system this much, I never would have bought it (well, maybe I still would have, the Nitro Fury was only $260 brand new at the time!!!). And with the fans, it was always about the noise for me. That would be the only reason I would upgrade the fans on the liquid cooler because it WAS cooling as advertised.

 

I'm holding off purchasing the ML fans for now and as well as reinstalling the liquid cooler, even if it means taking a little hit on my OC. The Hyper Evo 212 is doing a good job with a much quieter fan, and stress tests and games are playing along fine. I adjusted the case fan curves manually in BIOS and I already noticed a small difference in the stress tests. Additionally, I installed AI Suite 3 that's for my motherboard, and it was showing my motherboard temperature never actually reached beyond 32 degrees C during stress tests? Not sure if that's correct. But temps and RPMs all continue to look fine for the rest of my hardware.

 

Barring any unexpected odds with the Evo 212, I'll take what I've learned here and apply it to future upgrades. I can assure that the day I do need to upgrade any hardware, I'll definitely be able to make better decisions. I hate to give up on the H80i v2 but it's becoming too much of a hassle and the need to spend another $60-70 on case fans and removing the front RGB case fan isn't worth the OC difference between 4.3 and 4.5 GHz (I'm mainly just gaming on it).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...