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H115i Specifically Liquid Temps Only


Fakum

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So I have a new build (specs below) Corsair 500R tower with H115i mounted in top, fans on top pulling thru tower then Rad and exhausting. I am running 6 flavors of stress testing to overclock my CPU. I am NOT having any temp issues that are unexpected with the CPU itself. H115i seems to be performing well. What I am a bit confused about is the fact that not only are my Liquid temps (monitoring thru Corsair Link) only climbing 2°- 4° C during these tests, some of which run about 20 minutes at the moment, but when the tests are complete and I shut everything down except Link and CPU ID, I then run the fans at max to bring the liquid temp back down to about where it started he previous test, so I can then run the next test with a fresh cooldown. What puzzles me is why does it take sometime 20 minutes or more to bring down the liquid temp with no load (not much at idle) in the cpu? the pump is set to performance, so it is running at full speed. I actually slowed it down in an attempt to increase the heat rejection incase the pump was running the liquid through the RAD too fast.

Nice cool and great airflow out of the top, case has plenty of cooling and the case temps show to be in the mid 20's C. I just dont understand why its taking so so long to creep the liquid temp down when fans are running 100% and no load on the CPU?

 

 

(Windows 10 Pro - 64 Bit / GIGABYTE 3866MHz GA-Z170X-Gaming 7 MOBO / Intel i7-6700K 4.0GHz Processor / G.SKILL TridentZ Series 32GB DDR4 3200 Ram / Samsung 850 EVO 500GB SATA III SSD / EVGA GTX 980 Ti Hybrid/ Onboard Audio card / Creative Inspire 5.1 Surround Speakers / Primary Monitor =30” HP LP3065 @ 2560 x 1600 / Secondary Monitor = Acer 23" )

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Most likely it is a combination of 2 things. First, you are assuming all other variables remain the same after the stress test. This is probably not true. If you run AIDA, OCCT, ROG Bench or whatever for 20 minutes, your memory, VRM, PCH, GPU, and of course CPU all are active and producing some measure of heat during the test or any other time the PC is on. When you cut the test that heat does not vanish. Take a look at your before and after motherboard temp sensor readings. It most likely went up a few degrees. Since the lowest possible coolant temp is also the case ambient temperature the system resides in, a +2C rise in case temp will result in a +2C rise in base coolant temp. Now the motherboard temp sensor is just a single data point and may or may not be helpful depending on the board and its exact location. You might be able to get a clearer picture with multiple temp probes or a thermal camera, but having done it all before it is a bit of an expensive way to satisfy your curiosity. The other thing to remember is your CPU is not a perfect heat transmitter. Like any other hardware, it will retain some of the heat. So you run OCCT for 20 min you likely have a warmer piece of silicon and metal than you did before. Eventually, it will transfer out but during the process it would make sense for the the coolant directly on the other side and where the coolant temp probe is located to register a slightly higher mark.

 

I suppose the second is aspect is the general laws of thermodynamics will not allow 100% efficiency. In greatly simplified terms, the last 1 degree is always the most difficult to achieve. Most of this stems from the above, but really it is hard to put everything back exactly the way it was at the original point in time. This is why I am always a little suspect when I see reviewers running multiple tests with components in the same 1 hour time frame. Deadline reality probably trumps scientific principles and this why you also run an open test bench to try and minimize the heat retention. Nevertheless, this why I tend run my really serious testing 24 hours apart. It does not take that long to return to baseline, but from a practical standpoint in testing with a computer I use most of the day, testing comes first thing and then has to wait until tomorrow. You can speed things along by putting the machine to sleep for an hour or two and you probably should keep a log of room and case temperature for each test result if you are trying to compare them -- if you really are trying to find differences. On the other hand, if you were just curious, it is completely normal and this is why you should look at coolant deltas rather than face value numbers, all of which swing back and forth with room and case temperature.

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Fair enough sir! I do by the way monitor space temp as well during testing,,, what you say makes sense. What didnt make sense was why it took so long to cool down the liquid, but your explanation seems logical,,, I may just flip the fans over on top just to see the difference at some point, but thanks for taking the time to offer your perspective.
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