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Problems with K95


sverremunthe
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When I installed the utility I lost all light. The keyboard is totally black, what do I do?

 

In addition I can't rest my fingers on the keys without they getting triggered, this is not a good thing for people with tremor. I have never made so many typing errors on ANY keyboards as I do on this, and I've used computers since 1979. (I had to correct well over 10 errors after writing this).

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It's possible that a mechanical keyboard is not right for you and a less sensitive design would be better.

 

Your keyboard will be black if CUE is in advanced mode, click on the gear icon at the top middle of the screen and see if that helps.

 

It was Advanced, next to the gear icon. Thanks!

 

As to mechanical, wasn't the early keyboards mechanical, as well? And what about all those, like me, that rest their fingers on the keyboard? I can't do much, at speed, if I can't rest my fingers on the keyboard. Real mechanical keys were those you had on typewriters, and on the electric typewriters, you could easily rest your fingers, you had to use a tiny bit of force to activate a key, not much, just enough that your fingers didn't get tired when you typed several thousand words. I was hoping there was a setting where you could adjust the level of force needed (it would be logical to have it).

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  • Corsair Employees
The only way to adjust the force required for actuation would be to select a keyboard with a different switch. Which K95 MX Switch color did you purchase? You can also list the part number starting with "CH" and we can look it up that way.
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The only way to adjust the force required for actuation would be to select a keyboard with a different switch. Which K95 MX Switch color did you purchase? You can also list the part number starting with "CH" and we can look it up that way.

 

CH9127014-ND

 

Seriously, no way to adjust the force needed? Maybe time for a K100 where you have that implemented, could be useful for those of us that use the keyboard for writing stuff. :)

 

ps

Fantastic, only 4 errors while typing this + 2 for the ps

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It was Advanced, next to the gear icon. Thanks!

 

As to mechanical, wasn't the early keyboards mechanical, as well? And what about all those, like me, that rest their fingers on the keyboard? I can't do much, at speed, if I can't rest my fingers on the keyboard. Real mechanical keys were those you had on typewriters, and on the electric typewriters, you could easily rest your fingers, you had to use a tiny bit of force to activate a key, not much, just enough that your fingers didn't get tired when you typed several thousand words. I was hoping there was a setting where you could adjust the level of force needed (it would be logical to have it).

 

You may find the following guide helpful for your understanding of why the mechanical switch works the way it does.

http://blogs.findlaw.com/technologist/2015/05/blue-brown-red-your-guide-to-mechanical-keyboard-switches.html

Corsair doesn't make the switches, but buys them from Cherry, and provides customers with choices of switches. http://www.corsair.com/en-us/landing/cherry

 

Note that key pressure and actuation distance are built-in to the switch, and not adjustable once a switch has been purchased.

 

Do you know what type of switch you are using?

Cherry MX Blue would probably aid your typing. http://gaming.corsair.com/en-eu/corsair-gaming-k95-rgb-mechanical-gaming-keyboard-cherry-mx-blue Cherry MX brown is more sensitive, but still typists like them.

Cherry MX Speed would probaly take a bit getting used to. http://www.corsair.com/en-us/k95-rgb-platinum-mechanical-gaming-keyboard-cherry-mx-speed-black-na Cherry MX silent and Cherry MX red are less sensitive, but gamers still like them.

Edited by Comet ☄
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CH9127014-ND

Fantastic, only 4 errors while typing this + 2 for the ps

http://www.corsair.com/en-us/k95-rgb-platinum-mechanical-gaming-keyboard-cherry-mx-speed-black-nd

You have the gamer's dream switch--the most sensitive switch requiring the least distance to actuation, Cherry® MX RGB Speed. http://hexus.net/tech/news/peripherals/92273-cherry-mx-speed-launched-the-fastest-mechanical-mx-switch/

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You may find the following guide helpful for your understanding of why the mechanical switch works the way it does.

http://blogs.findlaw.com/technologist/2015/05/blue-brown-red-your-guide-to-mechanical-keyboard-switches.html

Corsair doesn't make the switches, but buys them from Cherry, and provides customers with choices of switches. http://www.corsair.com/en-us/landing/cherry

 

Note that key pressure and actuation distance are built-in to the switch, and not adjustable once a switch has been purchased.

 

Do you know what type of switch you are using?

Cherry MX Blue would probably aid your typing. http://gaming.corsair.com/en-eu/corsair-gaming-k95-rgb-mechanical-gaming-keyboard-cherry-mx-blue Cherry MX brown is more sensitive, but still typists like them.

Cherry MX Speed would probaly take a bit getting used to. http://www.corsair.com/en-us/k95-rgb-platinum-mechanical-gaming-keyboard-cherry-mx-speed-black-na Cherry MX silent and Cherry MX red are less sensitive, but gamers still like them.

 

there wasn't any choice where I bought it?

 

What type of keys does it come with as standard, and how can you buy a keyboard with other switches?

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there wasn't any choice where I bought it?

 

What type of keys does it come with as standard, and how can you buy a keyboard with other switches?

 

Found it. They sell a "Brown" too. They didn't make a very clear distinction between them, had to read the explanation thoroughly to see it (1.2mm vs 2mm ). Sending it in return (45 days full return, no questions asked).

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