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Corsair H110i - Stock Fan Specs


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Just bought a H110i. The box says the static pressure of the fans is 3.99mm and 113 cfm.

 

Is that a COMBINED spec of both fans, or does each fan individually have 3.99mm of static pressure and push 113 cfm?

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That is the individual "free air" specifications for each fan. Of course, you will never be able to move that much air with a 27mm radiator in front of the blades. Also, keep in mind those values are at the 2000 rpm max speed and that is not someplace you want those fans to be. 1000 rpm is plenty for most all CPUs, even up at the 200 watt mark.
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That is the individual "free air" specifications for each fan. Of course, you will never be able to move that much air with a 27mm radiator in front of the blades. Also, keep in mind those values are at the 2000 rpm max speed and that is not someplace you want those fans to be. 1000 rpm is plenty for most all CPUs, even up at the 200 watt mark.

Thanks for the response! Would it be OK to use different fans? I have some Thermaltake Riing 140mm fans I would like to use, but not at the expense of cooling performance.

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Certainly and I have the TT Riing 14's on my cooler now and the rest of the case. It is not going to move as much air as the stock fans, but there is an obvious aesthetic difference. 2 140's is enough for my 225w HW-E at the very end of the overclock range. The older single color models are 3 pin DC fans and would need to be powered and controlled through the motherboard. The RGB version with controller that came after is 4 pin PWM. I am using those now. It is a little more complicated since they need their own unique controller. Plug the fan into the controller. Then plug the single controller speed end to the one of the H110i connectors, if you want the pump and Link to control them. I do not have the newest "Plus" version. They are 4 pin PWM and should work, but I am not up to date on any tricks. They likely have a required controller of their own as well.
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Certainly and I have the TT Riing 14's on my cooler now and the rest of the case. It is not going to move as much air as the stock fans, but there is an obvious aesthetic difference. 2 140's is enough for my 225w HW-E at the very end of the overclock range. The older single color models are 3 pin DC fans and would need to be powered and controlled through the motherboard. The RGB version with controller that came after is 4 pin PWM. I am using those now. It is a little more complicated since they need their own unique controller. Plug the fan into the controller. Then plug the single controller speed end to the one of the H110i connectors, if you want the pump and Link to control them. I do not have the newest "Plus" version. They are 4 pin PWM and should work, but I am not up to date on any tricks. They likely have a required controller of their own as well.

I currently have 2 of the 3-pin single color models. So I just keep them plugged into the motherboard as normal? Does it matter that they will be a constant 1400rpm speed on the radiator?

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That's funny, you're second person today to ask about the same combination. From a cooling perspective, you don't need both sets and one or the other is plenty. Running them together is possible, but as you've noted you likely need two different control sources for the DC and PWM motors. Furthermore, because of the wide difference in range on the two fans and in combination with the two control source issue, trying to keep their speeds relatively close to each other is going to be a real pain and likely require frequent management. When the speeds too far apart in push pull, one set of fans can often become resistance for the other. This is usually more noticeable as fan chatter noise than an actual performance deficit, but it can be an irritant.

 

I don't particularly like the included fans on that model and prefer the SP140 LED, even though it has a lower volume potential. However, there is an argument to made to give the system a shot with PWM SP140L fans so you can experience the Link controls and how they work. If you hate the fans, take them off, put the LED models on, and connect them to the motherboard. I have a whole pile of different SP140LED colors and even if the statistics are not that impressive, it is enough for my 215W CPU. I find them compelling enough to use even when stronger choices are available. Long term, neither one may suit your needs, but then you will have a basis to make decisions about whether you need LED fans, PWM control, or just want a really quiet fan.

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That's funny, you're second person today to ask about the same combination. From a cooling perspective, you don't need both sets and one or the other is plenty. Running them together is possible, but as you've noted you likely need two different control sources for the DC and PWM motors. Furthermore, because of the wide difference in range on the two fans and in combination with the two control source issue, trying to keep their speeds relatively close to each other is going to be a real pain and likely require frequent management. When the speeds too far apart in push pull, one set of fans can often become resistance for the other. This is usually more noticeable as fan chatter noise than an actual performance deficit, but it can be an irritant.

 

I don't particularly like the included fans on that model and prefer the SP140 LED, even though it has a lower volume potential. However, there is an argument to made to give the system a shot with PWM SP140L fans so you can experience the Link controls and how they work. If you hate the fans, take them off, put the LED models on, and connect them to the motherboard. I have a whole pile of different SP140LED colors and even if the statistics are not that impressive, it is enough for my 215W CPU. I find them compelling enough to use even when stronger choices are available. Long term, neither one may suit your needs, but then you will have a basis to make decisions about whether you need LED fans, PWM control, or just want a really quiet fan.

I will only be using 2 of the Thermaltake Riing fans in a push configuration. My NZXT s340 case will only support installing the H110i in the front of the case with 2 fans attached, due to the cable management plate (which I don't plan on removing).

 

What would happen if I plug the 3-pin connectors from the Thermaltake fans into the 4-pin power dongle on the H110i? Will it regulate fan speeds using voltage, even though they aren't variable speed fans?

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Whoops. I had the two threads cross-crossed in my mind. Regardless, the same principle applies and the Riing 140 and SP140 LED have similar properties and performances. If you plug a 3 pin DC fan into a PWM controller, it will run at 100% all the time. That is going to be a bit much. If possible, control from the board or other source. If not, you probably want some pwm fans for the pump.
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