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Memtest failed with XMP enabled.


hugopua

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I run memtest86 tested on both of the below configuration:

 

1) XMP enable - 2400MHZ 1.35v 10-12-12-28 - Result FAILED.

2) default - 2133MHZ 1.2v 15-15-15-36 - Result PASSED.

 

My setup is :

Intel Core i7 7700T

Gigabyte Z270X Gaming 8

Corsair RAM CMD16GX4M2B2400C10

http://www.corsair.com/en-gb/dominator-platinum-series-16gb-2-x-8gb-ddr4-dram-2400mhz-c10-memory-kit-cmd16gx4m2b2400c10

 

My question is

1) Why memory test failed on XMP enabled?

2) Is it normal? Why?

3) The SPD is 2133MHZ and running at 2400MHZ consider overclock?

3) Intel i7 7700T support 2400MHZ, Any specific terms to follow? like cannot low CAS?

 

Thank you for help. Have a nice day.

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  • 2 weeks later...
Yes, technically 2400 is an overclock. I would not normally expect it to fail Memtest at 2400, but 10-12-12-28 are fairly tight settings. You could try manually entering the 4 primary timings and 1.35v voltage into your BIOS. You would likely need to address VCCSA as well, although I cannot tell you a value for 7700K. I would also expect a 2400 XMP kit to work right out the box, so you may wish to consider replacing it or contact Corsair Tech support to see what they say.
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Good point and also make sure your Memtest 86 is up to date. Using old versions with DDR4 tends to kick out false errors. You could also confirm the errors by using another tool, like HCI Memtest. That is always a good idea when you fail a test.
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Good point and also make sure your Memtest 86 is up to date. Using old versions with DDR4 tends to kick out false errors. You could also confirm the errors by using another tool, like HCI Memtest. That is always a good idea when you fail a test.

 

I'm using latest version of memtest86.

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Yes, technically 2400 is an overclock. I would not normally expect it to fail Memtest at 2400, but 10-12-12-28 are fairly tight settings. You could try manually entering the 4 primary timings and 1.35v voltage into your BIOS. You would likely need to address VCCSA as well, although I cannot tell you a value for 7700K. I would also expect a 2400 XMP kit to work right out the box, so you may wish to consider replacing it or contact Corsair Tech support to see what they say.

 

This memory timing is default on xmp profile.

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This memory timing is default on xmp profile.

 

I am not entirely sure of your meaning. XMP is nothing more than a preset memory overclock. Besides primary, secondary, and tertiary timings, enabling it may may also change DRAM voltage, base clock, strap, VCCSA, VCCIO, or whatever else the motherboard manufacturer programs the BIOS to do. Some of the these values are encoded on the memory module (timings and DRAM voltage). Others are the purview of Gigabyte. An XMP preset is a universal overclock designed to work with as many boards as possible. That is not the same as designing it specifically for your motherboard. That is something partially addressed by GA when make the BIOS. By setting the primary timings and voltage manually, then leaving the secondary and tertiary timings to AUTO, the board may select slightly softer values to allow you to boot. That is general goal from a motherboard manufacturer's point of view.

 

'Supported' does not mean guaranteed to work. From a board maker's perspective, it means they have a setting that will allow to select that frequency in the BIOS. 3866 or 4000 is also likely supported. That doesn't mean you will be able run it.

 

I would expect you to be able to run 2400 without issue. You need to discern between timings that are just a little too tight for your exact hardware combination and a faulty memory module. Setting the timings manually is the easier step. After that, you need to run Memtest one stick at a time at 2400 to find if there is an issue. Since you passed 2133 without issue, I suspect the former and fine tuning the overclock should be the next step.

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I am not entirely sure of your meaning. XMP is nothing more than a preset memory overclock. Besides primary, secondary, and tertiary timings, enabling it may may also change DRAM voltage, base clock, strap, VCCSA, VCCIO, or whatever else the motherboard manufacturer programs the BIOS to do. Some of the these values are encoded on the memory module (timings and DRAM voltage). Others are the purview of Gigabyte. An XMP preset is a universal overclock designed to work with as many boards as possible. That is not the same as designing it specifically for your motherboard. That is something partially addressed by GA when make the BIOS. By setting the primary timings and voltage manually, then leaving the secondary and tertiary timings to AUTO, the board may select slightly softer values to allow you to boot. That is general goal from a motherboard manufacturer's point of view.

 

'Supported' does not mean guaranteed to work. From a board maker's perspective, it means they have a setting that will allow to select that frequency in the BIOS. 3866 or 4000 is also likely supported. That doesn't mean you will be able run it.

 

I would expect you to be able to run 2400 without issue. You need to discern between timings that are just a little too tight for your exact hardware combination and a faulty memory module. Setting the timings manually is the easier step. After that, you need to run Memtest one stick at a time at 2400 to find if there is an issue. Since you passed 2133 without issue, I suspect the former and fine tuning the overclock should be the next step.

 

 

Hi. Thank you for your sharing. I run memtest for 2133mhz 10-12-12-28 1.2v without error. Am I safety to run such settings settings? Voltage as per xmp profile for 2400 mhz 10-12-12-28 is 1.35v.

 

Shall I choose 1.2v or 1.35v?

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OK, well that's good and it strongly appears there are no problems with the modules and it may be the XMP timings were just a little to low. CAS 10@2400 is pretty elusive for most people.

 

You can approach this one of two ways. The original suggestion of 2400 MHz, 10-12-12-28@1.35v and everything else on AUTO would be the closest thing to the XMP preset and virtually indistinguishable in benchmarking from the original value. However, that may still not be possible, depending on the where the limitation lies. You have three main variables to play with: frequency, primary timings, and voltage. It's best to only move one at a time while seeing if it is stable. Unfortunately, true stability is a long term project and Memtest alone is not enough. Once you find settings you are happy with, you'll need to use them for a week or two to make sure there are not further complications. Sometimes these things come in bunches and sometimes a week apart. Memory errors can be frustrating that way.

 

If the Primary 10-12-12-28, secondary/tertiary AUTO settings do not work, then you need to make a decision whether to lower the frequency target (to 2133) or to loosen the timings (for example: 2400 and 11-13-13-28@1.35v). Which one is better? I have no idea, but I suspect there will be little difference in actual use. I suppose my preference would go for the lowest timings at 2400 I could get, since bandwidth generally trumps lower timings in benchmarks. Even then, the gap is going to be quite small. To that end, I suspect your modules could also run 2666@12-13-13-30 or similar. I find 2666 to be the sweet spot at the lower end, but again this is usage dependent and you will never be able to capture the difference with just your eye or a stopwatch.

 

There may also be other profile information on the XMP preset, but you would need a software program like AIDA or SIV to extract it. In this case, I am not sure how useful it would be since we are in a narrow range of frequencies. If you are sick of this for the day, set your voltage to 1.35v at your 2133 10-12-12-28 timings. Voltage is the third variable. JEDEC standard is 2133 15-15-15-36@1.20v, so you are quite a bit under that. it is possible it could run with less voltage, but I don't see the point in spending a lot time to shave off a few hundredths of a volt. DDR4 runs very cool and at 3200MHz and 1.35v, my modules are just above case ambient temperature. No reason to start picking at the voltage until you have found settings you want to keep.

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Hi.

 

Actually this module is second unit that I claim the warranty from corsair. The results are same as previously.

 

My goal to use this is building a audiophile pc and what I need a low latency with 2133mhz. Hence, 2133mhz 10-12-12-28 is a good choice.

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