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High temps with the H100i V2


GoGrafics

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Hello there

I'm new here so this is my first thread to open here as i'm quite a bit concerned about my setup.

So my setup is (as shown in the picture) is :

H100i V2 cooling with stock fans

core i7 7700k

 

I let the corsair link configuration as it's recommended (Balanced) and the led will get red when temp exceed 45° (get's to 47 when gaming)

 

So they did when playing regular training (not something intensive) in Tom's Clancy Wildlands game.

+

When I put the cooler fans mode to quite/balanced/performance or any other mode, the fans gets reaaaally noisy even with the be quit silent base 800 case.

 

I'm new in this whole pc building, not quite new but this is my almost mid-end pc build.

 

So what to do or what to check ? or this is normal for temps ?

and what's the solution for the noisy fans ?

 

Thank you so much.

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The 10C coolant temp rise while gaming is fairly normal. I often run +8-9C with a larger cooler and a breezier system. In fact, you may see more coolant temperature rise while gaming than a straight CPU stress test. Usually, this is because of the additional GPU heat raising the internal case temperature, but also several hours of gaming makes heat all around. I don't think you have a problem with the cooler.

 

However, your fan speed dilemma and a higher baseline coolant temperature are connected. Coolant temperature is always affected by room temperature. If you are in a 35C room, the lowest your coolant could possible be is 35C. The preset Corsair curves were designed around a standard 20-23C room temperature. Now I don't know what your room temp is, but your case temperature is obviously higher, hence the 37C idle. Unfortunately, this is very common with the BeQuiet series cases. That dome on the top and case design tend to keep a lot of energy (noise) contained. Unfortunately, heat falls into that category as well. You are always likely to have a higher base coolant level than someone in a open, breezy case.

 

This does not mean your fans have to run full speed, but it does mean you will want to design your own custom fan curve. There are a couple ways to approach it.

 

1) Mimic the Corsair curve, but upshift your points by 10-12C. Effectively, you are using the same curve, but with a higher starting point.

 

2) Make your own custom curve. Set the minimum fan speed to something you can live with at desktop levels and link it to 35-38C -- around your idle baseline H100i v2 Temp. Then set the loudest speed you can tolerate for just above your current peak level (say 50C). This will give you an auditory warning if things really get out of hand. The bulk of the work in heat transport is done by the fluid. Fan speed is not the most critical element. You can experiment with different speeds to see if there is any change, but most of the time there is no meaningful performance gap between 1600 rpm and 1300 rpm on a dual 240mm radiator.

 

Most of this is about controlling the fan speed to limit the noise, but if you start to overclock the CPU you could start to close in on your upper limit when at 47C coolant temp. The coolant temp will be your baseline CPU temperature. So a load that causes CPU core temps of 55-60C when at a 35C coolant temp, will create CPU temps of 70-75C at 50C H100i v2 Temp.

 

 

The other thing to take a look at is fan orientation on the radiator at the top of the case. I am guessing you followed the rather definitive sounding "For best results, install this as intake" instructions. For most people with a multipurpose use system and for gaming, I usually recommend the opposite. Dump waste heat directly out of the case. However, the SB800 is tricky. This issue has come up multiple times and users have tried both ways with no clear winner. When the top is set to exhaust, the "dome" tends to trap heat and warm the radiator. When set to intake, the lone rear exhaust fan cannot remove the combined GPU and CPU waste heat and the case (and radiator) warm up. If you have a reference GPU design, intake may be feasible. An open multi-fan GPU may make this much worse. Only way to know is to try both and compare. You can also pop the top off and see if that makes a difference.

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The 10C coolant temp rise while gaming is fairly normal. I often run +8-9C with a larger cooler and a breezier system. In fact, you may see more coolant temperature rise while gaming than a straight CPU stress test. Usually, this is because of the additional GPU heat raising the internal case temperature, but also several hours of gaming makes heat all around. I don't think you have a problem with the cooler.

......

 

Thanks man I'll try your propositions. I got the case and I though this sis a good case for silent gaming and for cooling, but I guess I need to try more options.

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The temperatures of the cooling system are dependant of the ambient temperatures. For example, my h100iv2 has reached 48C but the room temp is around 34C so I guess it's fine. Do you have any way to monitor your room temperature?.

 

Could you be more specific about what game are you playing while getting those temperatures? Gaming is a little vague. In my case, Dark Souls 3 has been the most CPU demanding game.

 

As for the fans, I've discovered that the real problem with fan noise is the acceleration, not the RPMs, so I set the fans to 60% fixed and problem solved.

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