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H110i GTX High Temperatures


Accelerator6

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I have an H110i GTX liquid cooler for my i7-7700k and I don't think it's doing a very good job cooling it.

 

I've recently looked in the CAM software for CPU temperatures and noticed that on both idle and load, the CPU reaches rather high temperatures, despite having the liquid cooler.

 

EDIT: Updated links for Corsair Link screenshots

 

Here's an example for idle temperatures: http://imgur.com/9dvhggt

 

And and example for load (I was playing Overwatch): http://imgur.com/3c6L8T2

 

Another interesting thing is that sometimes there are spikes in the temperature, for example I've noticed it was 37 degrees on idle, then instantly jumped to about 10 degrees higher.

 

I have also noticed, something that only happened to me now, that after closing Overwatch, the temperatures seem to stay higher then it normally is on idle, between 50 to 60 degrees.

 

I don't know why this is happening and I fear the CPU may become damaged and I hope it isn't already, also because it is relatively new (I bought only about a month ago).

 

Please try and help me as I am not much of an expert in these things..

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Posting CAM screen shots is next to useless as we can't see the H110iGTX information, especially the temperature. You should also attach the screen shots to your post.

 

Attach CL 4.6.0.86 [home] tab screen shots to your posts.

 

See http://forum.corsair.com/forums/showthread.php?p=853900 for how to attach a file/screen image to a post.

 

Okay then, I'll update the post.

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Most likely, this is going to be "normal" for the 7700k chip.

 

Unless your water temps are really high, or you notice that water temps don't go down (slowly) after the machine goes idle again (suggesting poor water flow), 70C at load for the 7700k is what a LOT of people are seeing.

 

Personally, I suspect that Corsair could have done a much better job with their water block. Perhaps having it somewhat smooth would have helped.. (Not much, but perhaps it would lower temps a couple of degrees.)

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Posting CAM screen shots is next to useless as we can't see the H110iGTX information, especially the temperature. You should also attach the screen shots to your post.

 

Attach CL 4.6.0.86 [home] tab screen shots to your posts.

 

See http://forum.corsair.com/forums/showthread.php?p=853900 for how to attach a file/screen image to a post.

 

Updated the post, replaced the CAM screenshots with CL ones.

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Your coolant temperature (H110i GTX Temp) appears to be similar to your other component temperatures in the idle screen shot. This would suggest your case temperature is around that 35C mark and idle core temps a few degrees above that would be normal. The next question is whether this was after gaming, load, or just being up and running for a long time. There is nothing wrong with having a 35C case temp, but it means you cannot have <35C CPU temps.

 

I don't play Overwatch so I'll leave the finer details to someone who does, but what I have seen posted this is not overly abnormal. Is that steady state 60's when playing? Or is it more dynamic like most games? Be careful of the "title screen" on some games. It often presents an unexpected load. I still remember my GPUs shutting down from heat after loading AC: Unity and going to make a cup of coffee. The title screen was more load than the game. This can be explored further, but of course you'll need to sample some other programs. A bad cooler or poor contact will result in high temps on everything.

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Your coolant temperature (H110i GTX Temp) appears to be similar to your other component temperatures in the idle screen shot. This would suggest your case temperature is around that 35C mark and idle core temps a few degrees above that would be normal. The next question is whether this was after gaming, load, or just being up and running for a long time. There is nothing wrong with having a 35C case temp, but it means you cannot have <35C CPU temps.

 

I don't play Overwatch so I'll leave the finer details to someone who does, but what I have seen posted this is not overly abnormal. Is that steady state 60's when playing? Or is it more dynamic like most games? Be careful of the "title screen" on some games. It often presents an unexpected load. I still remember my GPUs shutting down from heat after loading AC: Unity and going to make a cup of coffee. The title screen was more load than the game. This can be explored further, but of course you'll need to sample some other programs. A bad cooler or poor contact will result in high temps on everything.

 

I spoke with my friend yesterday over Skype told him about this problem, and he told me to try and lower the voltage via Intel XTU.

 

I lowered it by -0.100 and I've tested Overwatch again and then Black Ops III and the temps mostly stay under 60C but sometimes go a bit over; it got to 63C at some point but I assume that's also normal for load temps.

 

For now it seems to work for load, but what bothers me a bit is that idle temps take some time to go back down to 40C, and sometimes they go a little lower than that (37C for example) and every now and then there's sudden jumps in temperature to 46C and even 50C and above, but it doesn't happen all the time.

 

 

Would this be considered "safe" temperatures (at least for idle), or are there any additional steps I should take?

Maybe even buy more fans? Maybe you can help me setup good airflow inside?

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You are a long way from the point where safety enters the discussion. Nevertheless, a lot of us like to optimize everything and anything, so you can certainly give this some attention.

 

Like almost all recent CPUs, and particularly Skylake and Kaby, the most effective reductions in CPU temperatures will come from fine tuning your BIOS settings. Even if you intend to run the standard frequency, setting it to a specific adaptive voltage instead of the AUTO table will likely tame the wildness down a bit. Gigabyte may also have some load line or other functions to help curb the voltage swings. It is the voltage that is at the heart of your temperature changes. Those little jumps you see surely correspond with core beings turned on and off as routine tasks are completed. It can be hard to see without dedicated software, line graphs, etc. for frequency and temperature. The 7700K is a bit jumpy by nature, but also capable of very high clocks. It is not a CPU were stock speed equals sub 50C temperatures like on some older 4 core models.

 

You don't need to add fans to the radiator. Your coolant temp is a little above average, but on par with the rest of your case. This suggests either case limitations, warm environment, heavy GPU loads, or a combination of them all. The H440 tends to run warmer than other cases because of the semi-closed nature of the design. Where did you mount the H110i GTX? Top exhaust?

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I have the H110i mounted on the top (the fans are facing down, inside the case), and I should also mention that for my PC, I simply bought the parts but I was not the one to actually build it.

 

I have a person I know that is very good almost anything related to hardware and so he built the PC for me. I would love to tinker around with it but I am so afraid to make a mistake so I don't what do in cases like these.

 

Maybe I should just ask him instead? maybe the cooler is not seated well enough on the CPU and needs to be tightened or other things like that?

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So the top radiator fans are drawing air into the case (label side is down), as well as the front fans? The only exhaust is the single rear fan? This is the most likely cause of your higher than expected case and coolant temperature. Turning the radiator fans around to exhaust out of the top of the case would restore some flow balance and also stop dumping more heat into the main chamber. The combined CPU and GPU waste heat during gaming would lead to higher temperatures for all components.
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So the top radiator fans are drawing air into the case (label side is down), as well as the front fans? The only exhaust is the single rear fan? This is the most likely cause of your higher than expected case and coolant temperature. Turning the radiator fans around to exhaust out of the top of the case would restore some flow balance and also stop dumping more heat into the main chamber. The combined CPU and GPU waste heat during gaming would lead to higher temperatures for all components.

 

Probably a stupid question since I'm not such an expert but, is it even possible to mount it the other way so that the fans are facing up?

 

I can take a picture of the inside of my case if that can make it easier for you to explain it to me.

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The fans can be mounted on either side of the radiator and facing in either direction, giving you 4 possible combinations. People will casually refer to which side of the radiator the fans sit by indicating whether the fan inlet is exposed to open air (push) or must draw the air through the radiator first (pull). The other variable is airflow direction and that is a little less confusing. It is described as intake (into the case) or exhaust (blowing out of the case).

 

The two sides of the fan are below.

 

The front or intake/inlet side is the prettier one, usually with company logo and a finished appearance.

 

http://www.corsair.com/~/media/corsair/product-photo-root/f/fan_af120_blades_w_1_1.png

 

 

 

 

The back, exhaust, or "label side" usually has a sticker with fan specifications. This side usually appears less polished than the front and will have some type of directional vanes to guide the airflow exiting the fan housing.

 

http://www.corsair.com/~/media/corsair/product-photo-root/f/fan_af120_back_b_std_1_1.png

 

The only thing that makes one side intake and the other exhaust is the direction the blades turn (and their angle). What throws most people off is this is the opposite of your standard desk or house fan. It's all the same, the blade just turns the other direction.

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Thanks for this information, I feel kind of ashamed for not knowing this cause it looks so simple now...

 

Another thing: While looking around in XTU, I have noticed a section in the System Monitors called 'Active Core Count' which shows 0 while I'm not in any game and shows 1 when ingame. Is this normal?

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If you run the stress test, it will kick up to all 4 cores. You are using them in your game as well, but the polling in XTU is far too slow to pick it up accurately. If you have SpeedStep or c-states on (and you should), then it often pols while one or more is at rest. I believe you can configure XTU to run less than maximal core tests, but I don't use it that way. Other than that, Active Core Count falls into the ignore category. Also, don't use XTU to overclock. You can look at the settings, copy them down, etc., but when it comes time to actually make the changes, do it in the BIOS. There is no requirement for the BIOS makers to ensure their software works with XTU.
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