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Exchange fans on NZXT Kraken x52 to Corsair SP/HD 120?


Andenn91

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Hi everyone! I'm thinking of buying Corsair's Crystal 460x chassi and put a NZXT Kraken x52 (240mm) in it. Im planning to put the radiator on the top of the chassi. My question here is if i can replace the fans that comes with the NZXT x52 to Corsairs RGB fans SP120 or HD120? Im planning if that works to connect the rgb fans to the controller that comes with the chassi, but is there a way to set the 2 replaced fans on the NZXT x52 as CPU fans and create a custom fan curve to them or do I have to set a static rpm to the fans?
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You could also forgo the CAM/pump control over the fans and power a pair of DC SP120 RGB from the motherboard or other fan controller. It is technically not as efficient as the level of control you can get from coolant temperature, but it would be a more economical option that buying 5 HD120's and trying to rewire/replace the 460x controller.

 

Yes, you could also put the radiator on the front with either SP120 RGB or HD120 RGB. Same issue with 3 pin DC versus 4 pin PWM power to the fans.

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It is technically not as efficient as the level of control you can get from coolant temperature

 

If a CL Mini was used to control the SP120 RGB fans and then it would be possible to control their speed from the Kraken X52 coolant temperature given a control program that could do this. I know of at least one that should ;):.

 

If you used a GRID+ CAM should be able to do this.

 

maybe I should just put the radiator on the top and just go with the stock fans without rgb and skip all the trouble xD

 

A lot comes down to which software you use to control the fans.

 

My advise is to get the system running without getting any extra fans and then decide what you wish to do.

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What if I just go and buy the ML120 PRO LED fan in red ? Those are the color I want and they are 4 pin pwm. This should just be an easy switch from the stock fans ox the x52 right?

 

Yes, the ML120 PRO LED fans should be easy and work well.

 

Looking at http://www.corsair.com/en-gb/ml120-pro-led-red-120mm-premium-magnetic-levitation-fan they take 0.299 A each and AFAIK the x52 can supply 1.0 A in total.

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Ok nice! But I'm still wondering about a thing. I saw this video [ame=
]
[/ame] and he is plugging in the radiator on the sp120 fans in the front. How does he make that work? The h100i v2 is using 4pins right ? And the sp120 is 3pin
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In the video, he attaches the 3 pin DC SP120 RGB fans on the radiator to the CPU & OPT. The other one to a chassis fan header, so he is not using the case fan controller or the H100i v2 pump controller.

 

Having spent the last week trying to manage the CAM software on a similar unit, it you decide to use 3 pin DC fans that must be controlled from the motherboard/controller and forgo coolant temperature control, I would not consider this a great loss for the X52. A few things I have noticed thus far. 1) CAM must be open and active to allow any sort of fan control when fans are connected to the pump. 2) The default fan curves for pump/fans that run when the app is closed are linked to coolant temperature, but scaled for CPU core temperature. This makes them useless when trying to operate without the software running. 3) CAM conflicts with every known piece of software on Earth, crashes frequently, and thus you will be closing it a lot. 4) The lighting options DO work when the application is closed, as long as it is not a reactive lighting profile (CPU temp, music, etc).

 

All of which means running your radiator fans from the motherboard, 3 pin or 4 pin PWM, will not be a detriment for the X52. You can use the SP120 RGB this way. This may be even more true if you front mount the radiator. There are situations where you may want more intake air flow through the front, where the CPU or coolant temp is low. The motherboard or case controller would give you more options. Unlike what he does in the video, I would recommend leaving the SP120 RGB on the case controller, putting the X52 lead on CPU fan (so the PC will boot), and the AIO pump header can be turned into a normal fan header from within the BIOS. If you put the radiator fans on CPU fan, it will only be able to run from CPU temp. You don't need particularly reactive fans for a radiator. Slow to medium and steady speeds get the job done.

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Hmm sounds like a lot of trouble for a beginner like me. I think I will go with the ML120 PRO LED on the radiator. But does a 240mm radiator with 2 ML120 PRO LED fit at the top of the case? In the video he is mention that the ram is taking up too much space and blocks the radiatior.
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You need to have low profile RAM (less than 42mm) to top mount a 240mm cooler. We are talking about millimeters of space, so this is going to be close regardless.

 

The ML120's are PWM and can run from motherboard or pump control. Those work fine. The point I was trying to make is you may be better off running them from the motherboard or a fan controller and not the X52 pump, no matter what you decide. If you put the fans on the pump, you must have CAM open and operational to get any kind of fan and pump control. You do have the option of using SP120 RGB fans all the way around and controlling them from the motherboard or the case controller.

 

You can set your pump lighting with CAM, then quit, tell it not to load on start (it doesn't half the time anyway), and your pump lighting will stay set. You can get pump lighting without the application.

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Hmm ok so you say that I should put the radiator on the sp120s and connect that fans straight into motherboard ? But the sp120 is a 3pin? And shouldn't be 4 pin on the cpu_fan connector on the motherboard? If I do this wouldn't I lose the auto adjust of rpm of the fans? And what about the pump? What features do I miss if I don't connect the fans to it?
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I am not saying you should use the SP120 RGB on the radiator. I am letting you know it is a viable option and the normal reasons to get a PWM fan to use with the cooler (like on a Corsair unit) are a lot less convincing on the Kraken series.

 

Nearly all motherboards can handle 3 or 4 pin fans on all their headers, but you have not specified with board you will be using. You should read the manual and find out exactly how many headers you have and whether they are DC or PWM capable before making any decisions.

 

The software is borderline functional. You can try and run your fans from it, but it is anything but low maintenance. It requires constant vigilance until the software is sorted out. No telling how long that will be. I am about to take my fans off the pump, because it is a full time job trying to keep the program running. If it is not working, you don't get pump and fan adjustments anyway. If you want to get a pair of ML120's that are PWM to cover your bases, go right ahead. I would still connect them to the motherboard at this point. Use your BIOS or motherboard software to control the fans.

 

You don't really need auto adjustment for the pump. The low speed on the unit is enough for most load situations. If the program is not working, there is no fan or pump control anyway. It will sit on the base minimum speeds because the default profile is set to liquid cooling, but with a CPU core temp range. It thinks the coolant temp should reach 60C before the fans should ramp up to 100%. At 60C coolant temp, you have a serious problem.

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I guess i can go with another AIO cooler. Maybe I should go with a H100i v2 and put ML120 PRO LED on them. I guess it will make the whole thing easier and I can plug in the fans to the pump?

 

Oh and im using the ASUS Z170 PRO GAMING which has 4 pin connectors to the CPU_FAN.

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Just because it is 4 pin, does not mean it is exclusively PWM. Your Asus board can utilize 3 or 4 pin fans and should select the proper type automatically when detected.

 

If using the pump as a power source for the fans is a priority, than perhaps you should look at something else. If you like the look of the x52, and it is impressive, then don't over-think this. Your motherboard can do a better job with fan control than the X52 pump/software. Let it do it's job. Lots of options. SP120 RGB, ML120 PWM, and the included fans are even decent. Lots of options when using the motherboard. Less when using the pump.

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Ah I see, I tried around some options in the bios and I tried to set my current CPU cooler (hyper evo 212) to DC mode. I guess that's the mode it's gonna be if I'm using sp120 on a x52. It seems that it works pretty well. Only problem is that I can't adjust the fan curve below 60% or 1000 rpm. I guess I can live with that and if I don't I will have to buy some 4 pin pwm fans i guess.
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THAT is the sticking point with DC fans. You cannot lower them below 60% in the Asus BIOS. Generally, PWM fans can go down to 25%, but this is always fan specific. If you load AI Suite and use the FanXpert software piece, you can tune DC fans down as low as 30% on some fans.
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From a user perspective, not much. The underlying issue is they are different motors. You control a DC motor by changing voltage up or down from 5-12v, increasing or decreasing speed. You control a PWM motor by sending signal pulses to the motor that cause a change. It needs a steady 12v power supply.

 

The control range is more of an issue without software control and 60% on some fans can be quite a lot. This is not really a DC vs PWM, "which is better discussion?". It's what do you need to run with your set-up? The quick answer to that is a PWM fan like the ML120 will work with motherboard or pump control and offers the largest control range with or without software influence. The ML120's give you the largest number of options from a single fan purchase. I thought where this started was "can I use the SP120 RGB fans on the X52". You can, with the provisions detailed earlier.

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Ok i see . But just have one final question. It's a little bit off topic but I see that the x52 is powered by a sata cable so I guess if I'm going with the x52 it's just to plug the sata into a sata connector and the fans to the motherboard? But on the other hand if I go with something like the h100i v2 I see that this is not powered by sata. What I can see it is powered by the cpu_fan fan header? How would I connect this if I want to forgo the pump?
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You understand correctly. The X52 uses a SATA power line to make the fans and pump go. The H100i v2 draws power from any motherboard header. However, both still need a "connection" to the motherboard to function.

 

You operation, with or without software, does not change based on this factor. The pump always runs on both units, reverting to a low or high speed depending on firmware parameters. Both units have low pump speeds of around 2000 RPM. That is more than enough for any normal use, including prolonged gaming or variable CPU loads. The H100i v2 has a high/low toggle mode. It is one or the other. The X52 is technically a variable speed pump that can be set to specific RPMs along a 1000-2700 RPM range, however this only works when the software works, and that isn't often. Pump speed is not a huge factor in larger AIO units. Also, the more I use CAM, the more I suspect the liquid temp sensor is not accurate or has been placed in a compromised position. I can wake the PC from sleep in a 16C room and the coolant temp reads 28C immediately. Meanwhile the cores, CPU temp, and the other radiator all drift down in the 17-20C range. Controlling fans and pump by coolant temp just isn't very practical at this point, so again I don't think you are giving up anything by running from the board.

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So just to be clear here. With the x52 I just need the sata and to connect the fans to motherboard and I'm ready to go?

 

But with the H100i v2 all I have to do is plug the fans to the motherboard?

 

EDIT: saw a video where the guy plugged the pump power straight into the psu with a molex?

 

I'm sorry if I appear dump here but I'm new to all this.

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Corsair H100i v2 -> Connect cooler lean to CPU fan. Set CPU fan to Full Speed/100%/PWM in BIOS. Connect PWM fans to pump connectors. Control fans from Link software. USB connector to internal USB 2.0 port.

 

Or connect 3 pin DC or 4 pin PWM fans to motherboard and control via BIOS or other fan control software.

 

 

 

X52 - Connect SATA power line to SATA cable from pump. Connect USB 2.0 header. Connect 'dummy' pump connector to CPU fan to prevent boot error. Connect PWM fans to pump block. Hope CAM application works.

 

Or the preferred method may be: connect 3 or 4 pin fans to motherboard (CPU & OPT or CHA fan header). Put cooler connector on Water Pump header, other CHA header, or CPU fan. (Something must be on CPU fan to boot - fans or pump). Use CAM application to set preferred lighting, then exit. Lighting will typically stay after shutdown and reboots. Fan curves often do not. Since fans are on the motherboard, CAM application no longer needed. Launch, change LED color, quit. If you are interested in using AI Suite, this last option is likely the best. AI Suite and Link tend to conflict and CAM and AI Suite certainly do as well. However, in this last scenario you won't be running the CAM software and do not need it to manage the fans. This could be done from the desktop with AI Suite/Fan Xpert and that would also allow you to run DC fans, like the SP120 RGBs, at lower speeds.

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