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Possible compatibility issues


Infernum

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Hi!

 

Recently my old motherboard crashed and instead of getting a new of the same model I decided a upgrade was due. So happily (much to my wallets dismay) I bought some very nice parts and successfully get it all mounted and installed in my LED fueled 750D case. So far so good right? Well, starting everything and getting everything running smoothly took a couple of tries but it did for a little while. Cue my headache. It all starting crashing with no error messages what so ever. I've managed to piece together some of what's happening, for one the motherboard is overheating due to insufficient cooling so thinking a custom water loop will solve that part.

Now the the possible compatibility issue. I'm running Corsair DDR4 2666MHz CL15 Dominator Platinum (which look beautiful btw, well done Corsair) but what I'm reading is that they're designed for Z170 and X99 builds. Well, my motherboard is Z270. Am I running into a compatibility issue here as well?

Stupid me didn't do enough research before ordering stuff since I was in a bit of a hurry to get my work station back up and running (being a photographer without a computer strong enough to handle large amounts of RAW files in Adobe's softwares does get a bit difficult hence the rush).

I also have some questions in regards to PSU that I would like to discuss with someone wise enough to cure my headaches!

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So it's not likely I'm running into any compatibility issues there then? Is it possible that the RAM is overheating as well? I know the motherboard most likely is, I haven't been able to monitor too closely while actively gaming or performing other tasks that put a heavy load on it but just at start up it's been reaching temperatures of 50-60 degrees Celsius.
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The "designed for X99/Z170" stuff is just marketing literature and predates the release of the Z270. If there were some type of issue with compatibility, it would most likely be centered of the physical construction of that specific motherboard, rather than a platform or CPU series as a whole. There is no reason to suspect a problem for this board and memory combination. As Emissary mentioned, a Maximus IX should no difficulty running anything at 2666, including 16GB modules. Also, the modules should be at 1.20v for 2666MHz and there is little chance of overheating unless you have some very extreme case conditions that have nothing to do with the memory.

 

Maybe you can detail the types of "crashes" you are experiencing. You said with no error messages. So is this a hard shutdown, straight to a powered off state? If so, I don't think we are looking at a memory issue. That type of problem is more indicative of either a PSU or power problem on the motherboard itself. You also mentioned the motherboard was overheating. Do you mean the motherboard temp sensor reads hot? Or the VRM module? Both suggest different things.

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The crashes are that it's rebooting. Not a straight up Windows reboot but complete power off state before booting as if I had pressed the start button. When it reboots one, usually the secondary, GPU is no longer accessible until I've performed a shut down and then booted again.

The PSU is about 1½ years old and has so far been running without a hitch but I suppose it's possible that there's some problems with that as well. The old motherboard failed (that's a indisputable fact I had verified first) so I suppose it's possible that other components failed as well, Murphy's law and such.

All the sensors on the motherboard indicate between 50 and 60 degrees Celsius at boot and it only gets hotter with use. Even when pumping all fans at maximum I'm not getting the temps down at idle.

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Those hard shutdowns are generally related to power delivery issues. Most BIOS have a setting where you can choose to reboot or stay powered down after that kind of event. Also, some motherboard related functions (and resets) can only occur with that kind of temporary power down (shutdown - click - restart). Those changes often related to Input Voltage or VRM phase management.

 

Now whether the problem lies within the PSU or the board is a whole different matter and I am not sure how much I can guide you. These kinds of problems are very tedious and quite often recommended step one is "install one of your other power supplies", which of course normal people don't keep multiple PSUs lying around. Still, I think this is where you need to focus. The PSU level is more than adequate and your maximal draw under synthetic conditions should not be more than 650 watts or so. That said, I've been in this exact position with similar hardware and a 1200w PSU. 18 months of infrequent but mysterious hard shutdowns had been blamed on a below average CPU overclocked to the edge. An RMA of the PSU for an unrelated fan issue and there has never been another one since, with even heavier power requirements.

 

I am assuming you are not overclocking the CPU while trying to sort this out. However, I am still uncertain if the 50-60C temperatures you have mentioned are CPU core temps, motherboard VRM temperatures, or the motherboard temperature (hopefully not). If you are not sure, can you post a screen shot of AI Suite, HWMonitor, or whatever you are using to check these values?

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Most likely the PSU since the board is brand new. Just so happens I have a way of testing that for sure by replacing it. Got a contact with a store that sells old model PSU's.

I'm using Corsair Link and verified with Speccy and both are telling me the temperatures are the motherboard. The CPU is not even above average temperatures with the GTX H110i cooling.

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Don't discount the possibility of a motherboard problem. I've had an example or two that were bad straight from the box and it only takes a bad solder job on something. There also seems to be some kind of issue with the board, related or not.

 

The "motherboard temperature" on most boards is an ambient air temp probe, usually near the center of the board or just below PCI-E #1. There is no electrical component there, so if it is reading 50-60C, it probably means one of three things:

 

1) You are sitting next to the grill in a busy kitchen at a busy restaurant in the middle of the desert. As such, the interior case temperature is in the 50-60C range and you get 3rd degree burns if you touch your case for too long.

 

2) Your motherboard sensor is completely scrambled, broken, or otherwise impaired.

 

3) We are not talking about the "motherboard temperature sensor", but the motherboard VRM temp sensor. 50-60C is still too high for idle and would be more common when running at heavy load. If you are idling with VRM temps in the 50-60C range, I suspect this may be the origin of the problem and this could lead to unexpected shutdowns/reboots.

 

I have my doubts about number 1. Both 2 and 3 would be worth of an RMA or exchange on the motherboard. This may be something to really take a look at.

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The problem is solved. Turns out it was a PCI-E cable that was the problem. Due to inexperience on my part and because it seemed a very illogical explanation that nothing was pointing at neither of the highly skilled friends I got to help me in trying to sort it out thought to check the wiring as everything seemed to be getting the power but apparently my PSU pumped out just enough juice for the GPU to run with only one connected PCI-E cable but it wasn't stable.
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