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Put H115i Fans to MOBO Headers?


Ntldrxp
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I believe my specs should be on my profile but if not i will i list them on the bottom.

 

My question is, is it possible to put both of the 140MM fans that are attached to the RAD on the H115i to my Motherboards CPU headers instead of the Y-Splitter that comes with the H115i?

 

Case: Cooler Master Stryker

Motherboard: Asus Maximus VI Hero

CPU: I5 4670K

GPU: Dual 980TI

Power supply: EVGA 1000W

Fans: 3x Corsair ML140 Pro, 2x Corsair ML120 Pro

 

Fan Setup: 2X ML120 in front set to pull, 1x ML140 top back of case set to push, 2X ML140 set to push on the Rad (yes i replaced the stock fans)

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Absolutely. You can stick them on CPU & OPT or on CPU_Fan with a splitter. However, this will obviously shift control to the motherboard and Link will not have a lot of utility other than two things. 1) Changing the LED color; 2)Troubleshooting cooler performance. You can only see the H115i Temp (coolant temp) with Link. That is key bit of information in most problems.

 

That leads me to a follow up question. If you don't like Link or want to use AI Suite for total fan control, then move the fans and set Link not to run on start-up. However, you have a ton of GPU hardware and likely the heat to match. A common complaint for a lot of people with heavy duty GPUs is their top mounted cooler fans run high when gaming in 4K, even though CPU loads are relatively low. This is usually caused by a large increase in ambient case temperature, not CPU waste heat entering the system. You can check by comparing the H115i Temp in Link to your other drive and motherboard sensors while gaming. They likely are all very similar. There is nothing you can do to reduce the water temperature any further than the case ambient temperature, except of course to increase exhaust flow. That leaves you with two options:

 

1) Set up a custom water temp based fan curve (H115i temp group) with a higher temperature for max fan speed. You will run +5-8C higher on CPU temps (or however much the ambient temp has increased), but the noise will go down substantially. This likely requires you to find the highest water temp you normally experience and set that to match an acoustically acceptable fan speed.

 

2) Set the fans in Link to a fixed speed prior to gaming. Set it as high as you can tolerate and then back it down a notch. This will provide the most exhaust without infringing upon your peace of mind. I found the sweet spot on my ML140's to be about 1100 rpm, but this is very much case and location dependent.

 

The argument against running from CPU temp control is it tends to produce frequent fan speed changes, which can be irritating in their own way, and you also may experience a further increase in ambient case temp by reducing exhaust speeds. That tends to affect everything. You'll have to decide which is more important.

Edited by c-attack
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The reason this even became a question in my mind is because of the Asus Suite 3. Normally i don't install software like that because in the past it was just useless software taking up SSD space. But when i bought the ML fans i noticed in Link that the software really wasnt telling them much and even on quiet ran than at high RPM. I was gonna buy a dedicated fan controller but thought id see what this software could do first. I now have a really nice fan curve that keeps it almost dead quiet when not under load and brings them up when heat rises. My concern is the pump, i have looked everywhere and can only see 2 options for the pump speed QUIET or PERFORMANCE and you cannot set a curve for it. I'm also assuming that the pump runs off the H115i Temp and not the CPU temp sensor which worries me because the 4670K are known to run hot. If i put the pump to quiet it may not move the fluid fast enough to cool and if i put it on performance it may wear the pump down faster. My goal is to get the front 2 fans to run at a higher RPM to bring fresh air in for the GPU's because as you said they produce alot of heat especially the top card who's blowing right into the other card, and set the top back fan and the Rad fans to a lower rpm to get the air out. I know what i'm wanting it slightly going into the realm of custom loop control but just not ready to take the plunge to that.
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Link is not a necessity and there a multiple reasons you may not use it. I specifically opted for the prior H110 (non-Link) when I put my first X99 together, so I could utilize AI suite fan controls. My fondness has worn off for that, but it is a normal progression to want to use them.

 

Don't worry about pump speed. I don't think we have seen a H110i/H115i user yet who has stated a meaningful improvement when using the higher flow rate. The faster flow rate will provide more trips per unit of time for each unit of water, however this would be more useful if the heat was originating from the CPU/cold plate. I suspect most of your water temperature comes from increases to case ambient temperature. I don't think flow rate will help with this. There is also this little quandary about flow rate versus time in the radiator channels. The faster the flow rate, the more trips around each molecule of water makes (transport). However, the cooling (or heat release) takes place when the water is in the radiator channels and the fans blow air across them to disperse. The longer the water is in the channel, the more time the heat has to disperse from that section of fluid. The faster the flow, the less time in the channels and theoretically less heat will be released. Frankly, this is a rather tough item to sort out and in the end and most people like quiet. Try it both ways, but don't spend a lot of time thinking about this one. It is the least likely place to make improvements. Since you won't be using Link, I would set to Quiet mode and then exit Link. The speed should stay set.

 

I don't think you need a dedicated fan controller. You have some options to explore first.

 

If you really push your 4690K to the edge, the limit on all Haswell CPUs is going to be the on CPU temp (voltage). Now matter how big your cooling system is, the heat has to pass through the CPU. Design elements and voltage will limit you before cooling capacity. My 5930K will use between 205-225W at full blast in it's current configuration. My H110 is not the limitation. No matter how much you OC the 4690K, you won't be able to reach that level of wattage. You have enough cooler. De-lidding is likely to bring the most meaningful gain, but I am not suggesting you go down that road.

 

You do have a lot of GPU heat, but no matter what you do with the front fans, they will never move heat off the GPU as well as it's own fans. With the ACX style, most of the heat will radiate around the two GPUs. Front fan speed is still useful, especially for trying to get some between the cards, but ultimately you must remove that waste heat from the case and more exhaust speed is the only effective way. This is probably your main focus most of the time and likely have already tried multiple configurations. You should continue to do so and experiment as you like, but remember those radiator fans also serve as half the case exhaust, even when radiator restricted.

Edited by c-attack
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I saw a YouTube video on how to delid and even with tools out there for that, its not something i'm brave enough to try yet. I think i'm going to first try putting the RAD fans on the mobo and tweak the curve a little and see where that takes me. I am waiting for my tax return to do my next build mostly cause i wanna wait a bit to see if the rumors of another CPU coming out Q4 for Intel is true and to see if a 1080TI will be announced at CES in Jan. I have toyed with the idea of buying an H90 and HG10 just for my 1st slot GPU as it produces most heat and is the more powerful of the two and keep the second card eating fresh air from the front fans. I don't know if you had a chance to try out EWKB new beta CPU configurator but it makes it so easy i almost wanna go jump into custom but the price for the components i'd need is high and i don't know if i wanna drop more money into this rig anymore as it is getting on the old side.
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I have considered going back to a custom loop for the final stretches of my Haswell-E CPUs. I am also waiting to see what the 1080 Ti will look like and water cooling that may be the deciding factor. One of the benefits of a closed loop system is portability and flexibility. I can take one out a case and put in the other, change components easily without disassembling, and run hardware experiments easily and consistently. One of my last custom loops was an inherited fixed loop job in a medium tower. Absolute nightmare to do anything, even change fans. Custom pieces are better and more flexible these days, but it does somewhat upgrade your level of commitment.

 

You might see a small reduction in CPU temps with a very expensive cold plate, but for that kind of difference and cost, you need to be walking the line of what's possible for the CPU. Given the variability of the environment resulting from the GPUs, it's hard to walk that line. It also isn't necessary. A more interesting variation on a custom loop might be if you can place the reservoir outside the heat zone. You would need a 540/740 Air or other two chamber kind of case. Both the larger volume of water and the relocation may keep water temps much lower. Obviously moving cases and custom loops are a big step and waiting for Kaby and the new Ti is a smarter move.

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  • 4 months later...

The argument against running from CPU temp control is it tends to produce frequent fan speed changes, which can be irritating in their own way, and you also may experience a further increase in ambient case temp by reducing exhaust speeds. That tends to affect everything. You'll have to decide which is more important.

 

Hi

 

I have Asus X99-A mb and planning to buy Corsair 400c, H115i (for front of case) and 3xML fans (two 140 at top and single 120 at back of case). Motherboard have 6 PWM fan headers, no dedicated pump PWM slot (not needed with H115i) and one 2 pin temp sensor input.

 

Im planning to connect two H115i stock fans, two additional top fans and rear one all to motherboard. Ideal situation would be when fans are not changing speed very frequently (so they are not connected to CPU fan header, and motherboard uses temp of liquid to control fan speed.

 

There are two problems with that:

1. How to cheat motherboard that CPU header is occupied by something, so there wont be any problems with booting.

2. Is it possible to connect temp sensor inside H115i with temp header on mb?

 

Option 1: I would try to connect 3pin from H115i into CPU fan in order to cheat motherboard, but im almost sure this wont work because if im not using AIO fan headers then there is no signal about rpm on 3 pin yes?. I mean - that 3 pin wont show me pump prm probably?

 

Option 2: I could try buying temp sensor and use some tape to stick it to open metal part of AIO, to get water temp that way. Then i will hope that Asus X99-A can use external temp sensor to determine speed of all fans connected to mb. I think i saw option in UEFI to choose CPU or MB temp, maybe 3rd option will show when temp sensor header will be occupied?.

 

Side question: Im assuming pump is hardwired with sensor inside AIO and change rpms slowly depending on water temperature?.

 

Thanks!

Edited by Tdigdtd
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Side question: Im assuming pump is hardwired with sensor inside AIO and change rpms slowly depending on water temperature?

 

No, using CL4 the pump can be either set to Quiet or Performance mode and the speed can't be controlled by a temperature.

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1) As you have guessed, put the H115i "dummy connector" on CPU Fan. Leave OPT empty as this is a mirror of CPU Fan. If you come up short on headers, you might be able to use the CPU Fan for an actual fan set to PWM and then put the H115i on OPT. This might yield some strange reported fan numbers in Link, but that may not be a concern. Keep in mind any fan connected to CPU Fan can only be set to CPU Temp as a control variable. I have a better suggestion and would advise putting the H115i lead on CPU fan to take that one out of the equation.

 

2) No, but you can use VRM temperature as a better motherboard fan control variable on Asus X99. It will take a little time to find your range, but there are very consistent values at idle, gaming, and full synthetic stress tests. One you figure out your normal operational VRM temps, you can set appropriate fan speeds. Remember, the radiator fans do not need to react to momentary spikes in CPU usage/temperature and the VRM temp will rise and fall in a steady fashion, much like coolant temperature. VRM temperature is affected by your BIOS power management settings. I recommend using the "Optimized" phase change setting for the VRM. It is better than standard in every way and you do not need the Extreme setting pegged at the highest level all the time.

 

There is a coolant temp sensor in the pump and the firmware will react to it without Link. However, from what others have reported, there is a very quiet default setting that will be overwritten the first time you launch Link. How the cooler will react without Link running is a little more mysterious. It likely will run on the last known profile, but you would need someone to test that out. Also, if you were thinking you could dump two fans onto the H115i to free up space and leave them, you will not be able to see their speed without Link and will have no control over them. This might be a viable solution for you, but keep in mind base coolant temperature will vary with room temperature. If you have a somewhat dynamic room environment (cold mornings, warm afternoon sun, etc) you will have very different idle fan speeds during those two periods. That may prove a little irritating and ultimately, since your radiator fans will be your only intake, you will probably need some active control over their speed.

 

I don't think you need the second set of fans on the radiator and I would dispense with the SP140L's entirely if you put on the ML140s. You just don't need push pull with this combination. The ML140's will be very quiet under 1100 rpm and that is more than enough for nearly all load conditions. However, when using the H115i as intake and the SP140L fans in the vertical plane, that may minimize some of their shortcomings and there might be a small, tangible benefit for push-pull and moderate speeds. There is no reason not to try, but if you find yourself stuck because of fan connections, the SP140L are the ones to eliminate.

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