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Corsair H115i and a push-pull configuration.


Krorghar
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Greetings people.

 

I'm building a new system, and I'm having a hard time figuring how can I connect the pump and the vents properly.

 

I have got 4 noctua P3000 140mm vents in a push-pull configuration attached to the H115i radiator, that means I have to connect 4 x 4 pin vent cables. Actually they are connected 2 to the CPU-FAN connector and another 2 to the CPU-AUX fan connector.

 

Now the pump got these cables:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v187/Ghostbird/CorsairH115cables_zpsvmrgdxhy.jpg

 

Manual says 4 is the power cable for the pump, and that it should be connected to the CPU-FAN, but if I do that, where should I connect the radiator Fans? Logic says they should go in connector 1, and for that I should use a 4-way Splitter, but will that cable have enough power to run those 4 Noctua P3000 industrial fans?

 

In the motherboard there is a water pump dedicated connector, Should I connect the water pump power cable there?

 

Also the point of connecting the radiator fans to the pump is to take advantage of the corsair link program that allow to controll the speeds of these fans and the pump, If i connect the fans directly to the motherboard, will I lose this functionality?

 

Many thanks for your help guys

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The manual has some inconsistencies yet to be corrected.

 

1 and 2 are the two PWM fan connectors for pump controlled fan power. This is managed through the Link software. In a normal push-pull, you could run 2 more splitters off each connector to power the 4 fans. However, see my comments below.**

 

3 is the SATA connector. This is the actual power supply for the pump and unit based fan controller.

 

4 is the motherboard connector. On this model it doesn't do much. Reports a fan speed and solves the common CPU boot error when nothing is on CPU_Fan.

 

 

**Now, as for push-pull with 4 Noctua Industrial PPC 3000 rpm fans...

 

1) At 0.55A per fan, you would be over the 2.0A current limit for H115i fan control from the block. Worse still, 2 on splitter are over your motherboard headers' likely 1.0A limit. Unless you have one the very recent X99 boards with that 3.0A high current header, you need to single connect all four fans. Probably better to get a dedicated fan controller at that point if this is really what you want to do.

 

2) Push-pull with 3000 rpm fans is beyond unnecessary. The airflow is not cumulative. The pressure is, but as the speed of the fan increases, so the does the pressure. At 2000 rpm you have more than enough pressure for any practical application. 3000 is an overabundance. I would be shocked if there is a single degree of cooling difference between one pair of 3000 rpm fans and a push-pull set of 4 at moderate or better speeds. I also think speeds over 2000 are borderline unusable from a noise perspective, but that is something the individual user must decide and I don't know your application. You can run a single pair of A14i 3000 rpm fans from the pump block. If this is for benchmarking or sport overclocking, then I can see the purpose.

 

If this is for more general use, drop down to the A14i ppc 2000 rpm PWM model. One pair is more than sufficient for a 280mm and any of the 140 TDP CPUs overclocked to the limit. Airflow across the radiator will not be the limiting factor. You would also have the option to run push-pull with the 2000 model and its drastically lower 0.18A rating per fan. You could run those split from the CPU&OPT headers for motherboard control or all 4 from the pump block. Both configurations will work, something that cannot be said for the 3000 rpm model. Regardless of what you decide, try and get the PWM model so you have the option of board or block fan control. The pump can only control PWM fans.

Edited by c-attack
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Many thanks for you response c-attack.

 

Motherboard is an asus Rampage 10th anniversary edition. It comes with one or two high-amp fan sockets i think, also I dont know how much Amps can the standard CPU and OPT sockets provide, gotta check the mannual.

 

If it helps I got one Corsair Commander mini, that is now connected to the case fans. Case is a graphite 780T that also come with 5 fan headers controled by a button, is inactive right now, as it ws only a 3-wire connector (i think is power amplitude modulated) and wanted the functionality of the 4 wires (pulse modulation) that the cmd mini could.

 

I know that the 4xP3000 may be a little overkill, but I cant return them, as I bought them many weeks ago in anticipation and the time allowed to return them has expired.

 

So knowing my system, what would you suggest it would be better?

 

Many thanks for your time c-attack

Edited by Krorghar
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OK, that gives you some options then. If you are going to run 4x3000, you must to use the High Amp header up near de-bug LED. You'll probably want to track down a 4 to 1 PWM splitter. In this configuration, put the H115i lead on CPU fan to prevent a boot error.

 

As mentioned, if you only run 2x3000, you can use the pump block or the motherboard for power and control. This would be my suggestion to start to learn how the pump runs when controlled via water temperature and some of the other features. If you hate Link, you can always drop it later and move the fans to the board with a better understanding of how the cooler should operate. Link isn't necessary, but it is helpful for troubleshooting or when first starting. However, this also raises a secondary issue. You likely need to choose between Link and AI Suite. Chances are you will encounter some software conflicts when running both. Other than the fan controls, I don't think much of AI Suite. It's a lousy monitoring tool with slow polling rates and you should use your BIOS to make changes -- not desktop software. You also have the benefit of some fan delay controls native within the BIOS. That was the one argument for installing it. All that said, this is something you need to decide for yourself and it is normal to want to explore each. I didn't come my viewpoint in the first week. It took 9 months or so before I grew tired of the negative consequences.

 

From a performance standpoint, I also think 2x3000 is plenty and that is overkill. I have the 2000 rpm set and I used them in Summer time on my H110. On both a 5820K and 5930K at 1.30-1.32v range, there was no cooling effect beyond 1600 rpm om stress tests. I don't know what kind of applications you need to run, but I never needed more than 800-1000 rpm for slightly CPU heavy programs. I use lesser fans for most of the year. Now it could be that 4x3000@800 rpm will provide the same cooling as 2x3000@1200 rpm and that will have value to you. I have not tried to run 4. Your 3000 rpm model also has different motor phase change points than my 2000 rpm motor, so the rpm point where the sound becomes noticeable may be different. You also haven't specified the CPU and perhaps the 8 or 10 core models would benefit from push-pull at low to mid speeds. Incidentally, the minimum for the 3000 rpm model will be 800. That's not an invisible speed on this model.

Edited by c-attack
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Thanks again C-attack

 

Processor will be the new 6850K 6 cores 40 lines. Tihs PC is a high end platform for gaming with a SLI of 1080's so processor shouldn`t be on high stress.But the processor will be overclocked from the standard 3.6 to 4.4 or 4.5, thats the limit for this processor and thus, generates a lot of heat, thats why I thought on a push-pull with heavy duty fans on the begining.

 

So your prefered sugestion would still be 2xP3000 connected directly to the pump? Or these new data have changed something my friend?

 

If i decide to go ahead with the 4 fans and use the high amp socket, How will be the fans controled? Bios or ÁI suite?

 

The other 5 fans that are in the case, It's ok I control them with the commander mini or do you have other suggestions?

 

Btw the airflow in the case is air intake from the front-bottom and Air exhaust from the top-back with the radiator in the top. Is this ok?

 

Many thanks for your time and patience c-attack

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How will be the fans controled? Bios or ÁI suite?

 

The other 5 fans that are in the case, It's ok I control them with the commander mini or do you have other suggestions?

 

Given you have a CL Mini that AI Suite can't control then you should not use AI Suite as it does not play nicely with Corsair Link. Further http://forum.corsair.com/forums/showthread.php?t=118371 specifies you should not use both at the same time.

 

I too feel using push-pull is overkill epically with 3000 RPM fans.

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Thanks red-ray, I also think is better to stand away from the AI link.

 

Well, since the P3000's are too much, and they can't be managed from the H115i pump since it suports only 2A. I have decided to swap them for 4 P2000's I have just ordered, and connect them to the pump and control them using Corsair Link.

 

Thinking about it, and taking in consideration the advices of c-Attack, I fear the P3000's may be too noisy, very power hungry, and hard to manage from the bios. Also, since the P2000 can do the job as good as the P3000's and can be managed from the pump, It's a no-brainer.

 

That means I have now 4 shinny P3000's sitting in the desk now, but what the hell, I definitively wanted a Push-Pull to support the heavy overclocking I plan to do to the 6850K.

 

Also since the P2000's will be connected to the pump, I have ordered the 3 wire version, as I Understand the pump can't handle PWM (4 wire) fans? Is this correct pls?

 

What do you think about it guys?

 

Many thanks.

Edited by Krorghar
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Well, since the P3000's are too much, and they can't be managed from the H115i pump since it suports only 2A.

 

I have just spotted this. You have ordered the wrong ones :eek:. You need 4-pin PWM fans, cancel the order and order 4-pin PWM :nodding:.

 

The H115i only supports PWM fans and the CL Mini works far better when PWM fans are used.

 

Also since the P2000's will be connected to the pump, I have ordered the 3 wire version, as I Understand the pump can't handle PWM (4 wire) fans? Is this correct pls?

 

This is strictly speaking not the case. The H115i can't supply > 2 amps, but you could use similar to http://www.ebay.com/itm/400712293079 so the fans are powered from a PSU molex connection and controlled by the H115i.

 

I feel 4 x 2000 RPM is a step in the right direction, but I suspect 2 x 2000 RPM will be more than enough. Were it my system I would initially use 2 x 2000 RPM pushing and see how that goes.

Edited by red-ray
Spotted 3 wire version
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Also since the P2000's will be connected to the pump, I have ordered the 3 wire version, as I Understand the pump can't handle PWM (4 wire) fans? Is this correct pls?

 

The pump can only handle the 4 pin PWM version. However, the commander mini may be able to solve that issue. I have never used one, so you may need pick Red-Ray's brain about how it could be best utilized in your system. You have a lot of control options.

 

I do think the 2000 is the better choice. Both fans are identical at the same speed, so the only thing the 3000 RPM can do better is spin faster between 2000-3000. But if you never use that part of the band, it's wasted and the current draw is substantially different. A single pair is more than enough to keep my HW-E's under 75C in a 28C room while at 4.5 and 1.30v. The 2000 rpm version can run as low as 400 rpm. Down in that range, push pull has a lot more utility and you will be able to have both a very quiet cooling system and one capable of massive airflow through the radiator.

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Ok so lets see.

 

I'm triying to cancell the order in Amazon, hope is still time. If not I'll just return the parcel.

 

Theres something I still dont get, PWM stands for pulse width modulation right? that means the fan header has 4 wires If I'm correct?.

 

But the pump fan sockets are one with 4 pins and another with 3 pins (please see pic on post #1). Does that mean's that one socket is for PWMs and another for regular 3 wired ones? How Should I conect the fans to the pump?

 

With the Molex Powered Splitter that Red-ray have suggested, Could I run the 4 P3000 from the pump? After all you have told me, I know that the P2000s would be a much more reasonable option but the P3000 are allready there, And their return window have expired, so It's an "use them, or trash them" option, If possible I would like to keep them.

 

Thanks guys.

Edited by Krorghar
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But the pump fan sockets are one with 4 pins and another with 3 pins (please see pic on post #1). Does that mean's that one socket is for PWMs and another for regular 3 wired ones? How Should I conect the fans to the pump?

 

When you look at the two sockets the one with only three pins has pin #3 missing. This for the fan speed signal, so only one of the fan speeds can be reported.

 

Pin #4 is the PWM control signal.

 

Pin #2 is for +12 and with the molex splitter all of these go directly to the PSU.

 

Pin #1 is ground.

 

You MUST always use 4-pin PWM fans.

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So I just plug the molex splitter to the socket with 4 pins, and connect the 4 sockets to the 4 P3000s I allready have right? That will leave one of the pump sockets unconnected is that correct?

 

BTW that Molex splitter you suggested is not sold by Amazon Spain, I have found this other in a local retailer:

 

https://www.pccomponentes.com/ekwb-ek-cable-splitter-4-fan-pwm-extended

 

Seems to be the same, could you check it pls?

 

Many thanks for your help Red.

Edited by Krorghar
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The splitter Red-Ray suggested is an unusual model specifically made for your situation. The "molex" adapter will supply the power to the fans. There will be another 4 pin connector (really only 2 active connections) that will transfer the control signal from the pump to the fans. You are using 2 cables to the normal job of 1, but this is necessary because of the current limitations. The EKWB version appears to be the same.

 

It seems like the place to start is with 2x3000 on the pump block (no extra cable needed). If it is satisfactory, then great. If somehow you need more, you can add in the two other fans and get the special splitter. If it is a horrible mess of noise and cables, you can work out a plan to drop down to a quieter fan.

Edited by c-attack
usual typos
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  • 1 month later...

The pump header (no.4) in the first page picture, Can I not connect it? Can I only connect the provided fans (came with the 115i) directly to the motherboard? (say one for CPU Fan header and the other for OPT CPU Fan header and leave no.4 without connecting it?

 

I am also trying to do the push/pull configuration with the 115i and Rampage V Extreme edition 10 same as the original poster. (with i7 6900K)

 

Am exchanging the SP140L fans with the new ML140 Pro , 4 of them, But I want them all to be controlled along with the pump using AI Suite. If no.4 is not really required to be connected, I could just get a 2x PWM splitters and connect each pair of ML140 pro to CPU Fan & OPT CPU. If no.4 is required to be connected for the 115i to function, can I connect it to W_PUMP header on the Rampage Edition 10? if so, How will I control it?

 

Finally, are the ML140 Pro really worth it? performance wise as I don't care about noise. The ML140 Pro goes up to 1600 RPM as per corsair site against the included SP140L 2000 +/- 10%.

 

Appreciate the information

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Yes, if you want to use AI Suite, connect the 4 fans to CPU & OPT with 2 splitters. Control the fans from the FanXpert and BIOS panels. In this set-up, Link won't have any control function, but will be needed to change LED color. I would still hook up the USB connection, but you should be able to leave off the marginally useful board connector. It can also be connected to the water pump or any other header that is available to tuck it away. It would best not to run Corsair Link in this situation. Leave it installed and you can launch it to change LED color or troubleshoot, then fully exit the program.

 

Is very doubtful you need push pull with ML140's or any other radiator designed fan. Moving air across the radiator is not going to be the limiting factor. I have a pair on my H110 now with a 5930K about as far as it will go. I don't need more than 1000 rpm for any real use scenario and can run bench tests easily at 1200. Removing heat from the water stream is not main issue at those voltage levels. You haven't specified your CPU, but unless you are running an 8 or 10 core overclock, it is likely you have less watts to dissipate than me. Thew only time you might consider push-pull on a 280mm radiator is on custom extra thick models, deliberately choosing weak fans for other reasons, or if you have an extreme amount of GPU waste heat you must get out of the case (980 Ti SLI).

 

The ML Pro line is at the price apex for 140mm fans right now. 2 of them makes it more reasonable. I do consider it worth it. The ML140's will run just under 2000 rpm against a radiator, but there won't be a meaningful performance difference. The SP140L's have a reputation for wobbly behavior when in the inverted position. This is very common to fans with that bearing type. The ability to make them quiet at desktop levels and the improved aesthetic may make the price worth it.

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Thanks for the quick response,

 

One thing you did not address, control of the pump. if am using the AI Suite, can I control the pump if am connecting it to the W_PUMP header?. also does increase pump RPM really help? what maximum RPM I can go without damaging the pump? which wire gives the signal to the pump? is it the USB? or the small fan header am connecting to W_PUMP?

 

I have mentioned the CPU, its i7 6900K. with the Asus Rampage V Extreme Edition 10 and 2x Strix 1080's in SLI.

 

Thank you for your time and information.

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You can only set the pump speed with the Link software program. The control will be through the USB interface, as far as I know. On the H115i, the motherboard fan lead has a very limited purpose and is more useful for avoiding the CPU boot error when power the fans from the pump. You won't need that when powering the fans from the board. Once you set the pump speed in Link and then close the program, it should remain a that speed. This is not something you need to frequently adjust.

 

I would still start with 2xML140 before spending the extra $70 for 2 more. Also, depending on your case, you may run into difficulty with push-pull and the top heat sink and power plug on X99 motherboards. You will need a very large case with lots of room up top. Even with that heavy hardware, you may only see 4x140 improvements on benchmark level testing. Normal load operations probably won't stress both GPU and CPU enough to create extreme case conditions and high coolant temperature inside the H115i.

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Got it, I'll double check the case room, I think I don't have enough, my case is the 900D from corsair. a big case with no room for Push/pull mounting the radiator ontop.

 

I will go with your suggestion, 2x ML140 Pro's both connected to CPU Fan & OPT CPU respectively ignoring the small H115i main fan header.

 

Thank you so much :)

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