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The test shown at the rear of the H60 packaging


Noinoi

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As a new owner of a Corsair H60, I'm very impressed at its performance at stock settings, especially when the fans are set to lower speeds.

 

I do wonder, though; at the rear of the packaging, there is a comparison between it and the stock Intel cooler, involving an overclocked Ivy Bridge i7, and the stock cooler failing badly while the H60 stays close to about 61 C (or something close).

 

Is it all right if I asked what was the test?

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Post the image you are referring to?

 

CPU Liquid cooling is more efficient than traditional air cooling.

 

This page should have a photo of the rear of the packaging. Nowhere on the rear, though, is a mention on exactly what kind of test.

 

(It appears that the packaging has been changed since that review has posted, but the rear still shows the exact same test.)

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Corsair didn't document the specific testing used, but we can assume it was some sort of synthetic stress testing like Intel Burn Test (IBT) or Aida64.

 

H60 is a very good cooler, we have many in builds with Intel Core i5 overclocked to 4.30GHz. Have yet to see one fail or have an issue with cooling performance. Wouldn't recommend the H60 for Intel Core i7 and above especially if your overclocking the system.

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Corsair didn't document the specific testing used, but we can assume it was some sort of synthetic stress testing like Intel Burn Test (IBT) or Aida64.

 

H60 is a very good cooler, we have many in builds with Intel Core i5 overclocked to 4.30GHz. Have yet to see one fail or have an issue with cooling performance. Wouldn't recommend the H60 for Intel Core i7 and above especially if your overclocking the system.

 

Interesting. Do you have temperature numbers for a Haswell-based i5 at stock settings, preferably with ambient temperature reading and what kind of test you have used for cooler testing? I would like to have a point of reference to verify that my cooler is working as expected.

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I currently just finished building a Haswell i5 4690K system and stability testing.

 

We use Aida64 and Intel Burn Test only for stress testing.

 

Here are the temperatures while stress testing with Aida64 and ambient temperature of 25 Celsius.

 

Default Settings on Auto

Idle - 32 Celsius

Load - 47/50 Celsius

 

Overclocked at 4.30Ghz @ 1.216V

Idle- 34 Celsius

Load - 60/63 Celsius

 

Keep in mind not all systems will perform the same, especially when it comes to the CPU Silicone Lottery. This CPU is one of the better we seen.

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I currently just finished building a Haswell i5 4690K system and stability testing.

 

We use Aida64 and Intel Burn Test only for stress testing.

 

Here are the temperatures while stress testing with Aida64 and ambient temperature of 25 Celsius.

 

Default Settings on Auto

Idle - 32 Celsius

Load - 47/50 Celsius

 

Overclocked at 4.30Ghz @ 1.216V

Idle- 34 Celsius

Load - 60/63 Celsius

 

Keep in mind not all systems will perform the same, especially when it comes to the CPU Silicone Lottery. This CPU is one of the better we seen.

 

Ah...

 

The i5-4590 at stock settings got me a CPU package idle temperature as low as 27C and a maximum load temperature during IntelBurnTest at 51C (IBT Standard, 10 loops), with 1 minute pre-test, the load itself, and 1 minute of cooldown period (I don't have too much time, but usually I just get ready to start testing if I see temperatures close to ambient as is). I don't think the lottery matters much when dealing with a non-OC CPU, but it is reassuring to see that my temperatures are close to your sample.

 

The room's ambient temperature is close to 24C when I have the air conditioner turned on, and that's what I've tested with. Noticing the temperature monitoring numbers with HWiNFO, it appears that the core temperatures actually got as low as 24C with the last two cores (26/25/24/24) (Oddly enough, CPU Package temp doesn't reflect it, but that's probably intentional); and the third core is the worst performing one (50/50/51/49)

 

By the way: is it normal for one CPU core to have a significantly lower temperature (~10C) than the rest of the cores/package temperature when extremely stressed? I once did some thermal testing with the Intel stock cooler to verify that I'm getting any benefit, and in one particularly punishing test (Prime95) the last core was still staying under 90C while the rest of its pals were already thermal throttling. After-test removal of heatsink reveals that the thermal compound was properly applied and spread evenly for the most part.

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The room's ambient temperature is close to 24C when I have the air conditioner turned on, and that's what I've tested with. Noticing the temperature monitoring numbers with HWiNFO, it appears that the core temperatures actually got as low as 24C with the last two cores (26/25/24/24) (Oddly enough, CPU Package temp doesn't reflect it, but that's probably intentional); and the third core is the worst performing one (50/50/51/49)

 

This is normal operation. CPU core temps will vary, if you were to stress test individual Cores the temps will be different for each Core.

 

one particularly punishing test (Prime95) the last core was still staying under 90C while the rest of its pals were already thermal throttling.

 

Intel doesn't recommend Prime95 for stress test since Ivy Bridge. Prime95 can lead to degradation and or smoking the CPU. I would question anyone's knowledge who recommends Prime95 for stress testing unless the system was built on a Sandy Bridge or prior platform. The system was throttling because it was overheating.

 

For best results use Aida64 or Intel Burn Test 'IBT' for stress testing. Some use OCCT for testing since it free to use. All three test will perform with similar results.

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Intel doesn't recommend Prime95 for stress test since Ivy Bridge. Prime95 can lead to degradation and or smoking the CPU. I would question anyone's knowledge who recommends Prime95 for stress testing unless the system was built on a Sandy Bridge or prior platform. The system was throttling because it was overheating.

 

For best results use Aida64 or Intel Burn Test 'IBT' for stress testing. Some use OCCT for testing since it free to use. All three test will perform with similar results.

 

Mmm. I usually do most of my testing with IBT or OCCT anyway, or Intel XTU's stress test mode. Prime95 was basically a "just in case I need one more set of numbers to compare".

 

Flipping the intake into exhaust seems to be producing identical temperatures (within 1-2C) at the same ambient temperature of 24C. This might come in handy, but I also wonder if the CPU will be significantly hotter if the video card is also being maxed out for some reason, and dispensing tons of heat inside. I know that my case will get really warm to the touch if the fans aren't being maxed out. (Even something like Unigine Heaven is enough to cause a 970 to hit the power limit.)

 

I'll probably need to do the test for real in the future, but for now, I have more pressing concerns... something appears to have broke in my desktop, and it's not related to the cooler, so the testing will have to be left in the future.

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