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Corsair H110i Noise Reduction


Kosie

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Hi All,

 

I just purchased my new PC with the Corsair H110i AIO cooler however I find that the Corsair SP140mm fans are quite loud and annoying. I've set the profile to Quiet on Corsair Link which has made them a lot quieter (spin at around 850-950 RPM) but at times that seems pretty loud to me to.

 

I've since discovered the 'Default' profile which has my fans spinning at around 500-600 RPM which is a lot more pleasant to deal with. I've tried monitoring CPU temps while doing some gaming for an hour or so and everything seems pretty ok to me. Haven't seen it go above 30 degrees C yet, having said that though it is winter in Australia atm.

 

Anyhow, the reason for my post today is to clarify a few things

 

1) Is it safe to use the 'default' profile and will the fans spin faster IF required?

2) I've been considering changing the Corsair radiator fans to 140mm Noctua NF-P14S PWM Redux Edition 1500 RPM fans for a whisper quiet operation. Has anyone done this and can notice a difference in noise with not so much impact to temps?

3) If I were to change the fans can the Noctuas be connected straight into the pump to still be controlled via Corsair Link?

4) Everyone says to setup a custom profile, I really have no idea how to do this or what to look for to setup a profile correctly. I'm aiming for quiet performance but if, and only if required, I'm happy for the fans to spin up to keeps things cooler.

 

 

If anyone can help with the above questions I'd greatly appreciate it. Oh and I should mention, I'm using the stock Phantek 1400mm fan at the rear of the case and 2x 140mm Noctua NF-P14S PWM Redux Edition 1200 RPM fans at the front of the case.

 

Thanks in advance

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1) Of course, however I am surprised you find this setting produces lower fan speeds than the quiet setting. The fan speed is tied to your water temperature (H110i Temp in the last panel of Link). Whether or not a particular profile works for you will be largely determined by the initial water temperature at idle. Most of the preset profiles will build from the lowest speeds at 20C up to a maximum fan speed at 40C H110i temp. So, if your room temp is 17C and it's about 21C inside the case, that 21C is also going to be your base water temperature. You will see low fan speeds. A sustained load might take you up to 25C water temp, but the fans are still quite reasonable.

 

Fast forward to Summer. It's now 32C in your room and your case temperature is 36C. As soon as you power on, the fans will spin up high. As soon as your start doing something, you will max out at 2000 rpm. Yes, your CPU temperatures will be 15C higher than Winter because everything in the room is 15C warmer, even before you powered on. There is nothing you can do about that, except reduce the room temp, something not always possible.

 

The fans' job is to remove heat from the water. They can't do anything else, like reduce your room temperature. So if your starting water temp was 32C and your load temp is 35C, the most you can reduce the CPU temperature with fans is 3C. You can't reduce the water temp below the case internal temperature. That can be affected by the overall room temp and your other hardware. Big watt GPUs usually have some effect on your water temperature.

 

2 & 3) Those are fine. Make sure you get the PWM version you specified. That will give you the option of powering and controlling them from the pump block or motherboard. There should no meaningful impact on your CPU or water temperature. You are not using the 1500-2000 part of the RPM band and you don't need to. I use almost double your CPU wattage with a 5930K is a highly overclocked state. I don't need 1500 rpm either. You should never need more than a 1000 rpm (140mm fan) for gaming and probably even less in Winter.

 

4) Yes, you ultimately may want two custom profiles. One for Summer and one for Winter. This is very much dependent on your local conditions, but there are two ways to go about this.

 

a) The base fan profiles (except quiet) use an approximate +17C range for minimum to maximum fan speeds. Find your base idle water temperature for a particular season and then make that the minimum. Add 17C to that number and make that the maximum. Your normal water temp delta over idle should be linear across the seasons, so you can simply adjust the starting point for that same scale. If you baseline water temp is 27C while at idle, set that for 500 rpm and make 44C the maximum speed. If your water temp is rising 17C during your use, then we need to talk about some other things. This method may not work for people with heavy GPU set-ups (980Ti x2). You can also tailor one for you unique usuage.

 

b) Again, find you baseline water temp at idle. Set this to the low 500 rpm fan speed. Run the heaviest program/load you normally use. This should not be a stress test unless that is what you do all day long. Play your game or whatever as your normally and whenever you are done, note the load water temperature. Set the fans to level you are comfortable listening for an extended length of time (like gaming). So, lets say a 27C baseline at 500 rpm and a 33C=1000 rpm. Leave yourself a little room past that number for daily fluctuations in temperature. Remeber, +1C in the room will also mean +1C on the water temp. So, then at 36C start sloping the line up, with a nice sharp rise toward the end. This serves two purposes. It will cover any overshoot without dramatically increasing the noise and if you do encounter an unexpected rise in water temp, you will get an audible alarm in those fans at 2000 rpm. You should not have a miraculous +10C over normal water temp one day. If you do, it suggests something is wrong. On the 1500 rpm fan, you won't quite have the bandwidth to signal alarm, but you don't need anything above 1200 -- even for stress tests. Save the 1500 rpm as the alarm speed.

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That is extremely helpful thank you so much. I've been thinking about changing the fans also as mentioned above and with the 2 nocturnal fans I mentioned that are 1500 RPM I've decided I might put those at the front of my case to provide more airflow and then add my current 1200rpm ones to the radiator. But then again having that extra rpm as an 'alarm' isn't a bad thing either. Thanks again
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I would suggest sticking to you original plan of 1500 rpm on the radiator and 1200 on the front. First, you will never get your max speed when faced with the resistance from the radiator. That 1200 will become something between 1050 and 1125. That's not an enormous loss, however it does mean you might operate for periods above 90% of maximum. Most fans tend to gain quite a bit of motor noise in the last 10%. If you can help it, stay out of that zone. I use 1200 rpm fans for most of the Winter and it is functional, however I do switch them out for something with a higher reach when it gets warm for just that reason. I have a multitude of different fans I can use, but if you are looking for a single year round fan, the 1500 rpm model fits the bill.

 

The other reason is I don't think the 1500 rpm on the front will get you a whole lot. 1) that's pretty loud, although certainly case specific. 2) it would be wonderful if increasing your intake by 30 cfm dropped your internal case temperatures by 5-10C, but unfortunately you don't get those kinds of gains. Compare your ambient room temperature to your motherboard temp sensor and idle water temperature to get a rough idea of your internal case temperature. Most people might have 4-6C difference between room temp and case temp. Without changing the case design, you will be lucky to drop case temperature by more than 1C, but there are always exceptions. Since you are going to buy the 1500 rpm model anyway and will have both sets, feel free to experiment.

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That makes sense. I'll give it a try with the 1500s on the radiator and work from there. My water temp is around 21-22 degrees when I turn on the PC. Bare in mind it's winter here now and that's with my heaters on. So in summer that would increase quite easily to 31-32 degrees I'd say. Ideally I just want to setup an all round good profile that keeps me going both season. Maybe using the noctuas on quiet mode will suffice along with some noise reduction.

 

Edit: just wondering will negative vs positive airflow do much to cooling? If I mount the 1500s on the radiator I still maintain a negative airflow setup. However if I put the 1500s at the front and 1200s on the radiator I'll have positive airflow meaning more air in which my understanding means less soon on the fans. Is that correct or am I just starting to overthink things now? Maybe I'll just stick to doing what you said above which was my original idea, usuall sticking to the original plan works out better from my experience

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In Winter, you can use any of the curves. It won't matter since you're at the bottom of the scale. How much tweaking you have to do depends on the variability of your local climate. If you're in Brisbane or North Coast you probably only need a hot weather curve in addition to the default. If you're in Melbourne or somewhere else with rather variable conditions, you might tweak a little more. Just remember you are really managing fan noise. The cooler will still do its job on all but the most extreme overclocks.

 

Don't worry about positive pressure either. The radiator fans are quite restricted. An 80cfm fan will not move that amount of air. Each set-up is unique and it's a hard to measure value, but half is a reasonable guess when at maximum speed, something we are trying to avoid. Your actual exhaust flow is less than you think. When you consider you'll keep the top rad fans running as low as possible, you will have positive pressure all the time. I am not a big proponent of the positive pressure/dust prevention theories, but you are going to be naturally in this state anyway. Of course, all you have to do to create it is bump up your front fan speed, something that can have other benefits when gaming.

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Hello again, sorry to re-visit this thread but I'd like to ask a case fan question. Should my 2 front case fans be spinning faster than the radiator fans because at the moment the way its setup they are and they make a really strange sound. I'm not sure if thats because of the way they are setup or what but I'm really finding it difficult to set the right fan speeds at the moment :(
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Even at 2000 rpm, I don't think the exhaust flow is capable of creating enough pressure when radiator restricted to affect the front fans in that way. One way to check would be at idle when the radiator fans are at a nominal level. You could then set them to a manual high speed in Link, but I don't think the flow difference is great and the distance to far for that kind of interaction.

 

What does the front fan noise sound like? Does it change with fan speed? Is it uniform or sporadic?

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Hey - i just uploaded a video to youtube, here is the link

 

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It's that strange 'wooooo' sound. It starts to happen when the fan is spinning from around 700-750 RPM so its really annoying...

 

Not sure if its the setup or if the fans are faulty but they are brand new Noctua Redux fans that I got with my PC. I'm 99% sure they are connected with a Y splitter and to PWM as I can control them manually via the BIOS but both fans together, not separate.

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Also while I've got you c-attack I've setup my radiator profile as follows, please provide feedback advice on it :P

 

Idle temp at the moment is between 22-24 usually so have it starting at 500RPM

 

Then I've set it to spin at 700ish RPM when it hits 30 degrees. I play WoW mainly at the moment so CPU/Water Temp doesn't get too hot on WoW.

 

At 40 degrees ive set it to 900 RPM, 50 degrees 1300 then then 70 degrees up to 2000 RPM

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I can hear it. One possibility is 700-750 rpm is a motor phase change point on the fan and your are hearing a repeated change as it hops back and forth across that point. Noctua does not indicate where those points are publicly and unfortunately the Redux series is one of the few holes in my collection, so I can't throw on a pair and test. Try to bump the speed up or down by 100 rpm and see if there is an audible change. Also, verify your BIOS is fan control is set to PWM mode, not DC. If none of that makes a difference or the if noise steadily gets worse with speed, we'll probably need to look at the physical front of the case.

 

As for the fan curve, that might be a good Summer curve. However, I had better give you some ranges on the water temperature. You will never reach 70C, no matter what you do. That's a pump is off and I'm running prime95 water temperature. +20C over your room ambient should be about the extreme limit.

 

So for Winter, what you have with the low 500, 700 at 30C is fine, but then I would set 1500 for 40C. That is an effective fan level at if you are +16-18C over room temp, you may need it. Then set the 2000 for 50C. If you hit 50C in Winter, something is wrong. For Summer, shift the whole curve by the change in room temp. So if it's +10C warmer in the room. Start the 500 at 30C, 900@40C, 1500@50C, etc. This is a farily gentle curve. I can be made more aggressive in the middle if needed.

 

These fan points are not super critical. 900 vs 1000 rpm on the fans is fairly meaningless for cooling. However, most fans have tipping points where you change motor phases and the noise is grows appreciably more than the 100 rpm mark before. I am not using those fans, so I can't give the points. Also, noise is quite subjective, so it's better if you decide your own. Just don't get hung up on the minutia. It doesn't matter that much.

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So I tested the fans, they were set to DC mode in the BIOS but putting them to PMW didn't change much from memory (I'll double check tonight when home from work). As for the noise of starts at about the 700 mark and continues right through to max RPM. The rest I did was just putting the fan speed from standard (700-800 rpm) to full in the BIOS and you can hear it gets kinda louder until fan speed drops off. I've created a custom curve for the fans and at idle they run at 500-600 where you don't hear the sound, but as soon as I load a game or something the fans briefly spin up and you can hear it. To me it's not normal, I've never had this issue. I'm strongly considering replacing the fans but just spent a solid $5k on this build I don't feel I should need to do this.

 

Thanks for your help with the radiator profiles too, I have absolutely no idea what curves I should use so that helps. 1500 RPM on the corsair fans is really loud for me hence why I set the 40 degree mark to be 900 RPM then anything hotter to start Rampling up abit. Ideally I'd like one fan curve for both summer and winter if that were possible so was trying to thong of temperature scenarios in both seasons here in Melbourne. Can my 30 degree 700 RPM be set lower? This is my issue, I have no idea what's too low or too high haha.

 

Anyway, my main concern at the moment is those noctuas at the front of my case, they will drive me crazy in summer with hotter temps and that noise, not to mention even during streaming they'll ramp up

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Last question in regards to case fans, since I have a dual radiator cooling my CPU, are case fans actually required? I'm not saying I'm going to remove them but I'm just curious if they actually have any impact on the water/CPU temps? I'm just thinking, to avoid hearing this noise I can setup a custom fan profile for the 2 front fans to only operate between the 400-700RPM mark before I start hearing the annoying sound. From what I can see they are setup as intake to bring air in air so I guess to keep air moving its certainly a good idea to not completely switch them off.
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I have the same motherboard, with an overclocked 6600K in a 900D case. The case fans (3 x 120mm Noctua on the front and a 140MM Noctua Redux on the back) are all controlled by Fan Xpert on super quiet so they don't spin below 40 degrees, making the PC almost silent, although to be honest I often need to look to see if they're running, they are very quiet. Depending on ambient temp, it runs mid 20's to low 30's on idle and mid to high 50's when playing Fallout 4 at 4K.
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I have the same motherboard, with an overclocked 6600K in a 900D case. The case fans (3 x 120mm Noctua on the front and a 140MM Noctua Redux on the back) are all controlled by Fan Xpert on super quiet so they don't spin below 40 degrees, making the PC almost silent, although to be honest I often need to look to see if they're running, they are very quiet. Depending on ambient temp, it runs mid 20's to low 30's on idle and mid to high 50's when playing Fallout 4 at 4K.

 

Do you also have a H110i with the stock fans on it or have you replaced those with Noctuas too?

 

I'm not running Fan Xpert but I think I should. Only concern is I've read that Fan Xpert and Corsair Link conflict one another, can you confirm if this is true?

 

Anyhow, I've taken off my front cover on the PC and the Noctuas I have still make that 'wooing' noise so I dunno if I'm just unlucky and got to faulty ones or if thats just how these are. Someone told me above 800RPM they are loud which seems strange for Noctua. I've run the Fan Optimization tool in the BIOS and fortunently its set my case fans to run really quiet so hopefully they wont ever go above 800RPM.

 

My radiator profiles seem fine atm, PC running at 28.6 degrees and fans spinning just under 700RPM (maybe I can even drop this a bit more) but the noise isn't really loud, I can hear the pump more if anything. I'm still considering swapping the fans for something quieter because come summer I'm sure they'll get loud. I think the last thing I should really do is run Prime95 or something to stress test the PC and see what temps it reaches. No idea how to do this but maybe one day I'll try.

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I'll try to tackle this in parts.

 

So I tested the fans, they were set to DC mode in the BIOS but putting them to PMW didn't change much from memory (I'll double check tonight when home from work). As for the noise of starts at about the 700 mark and continues right through to max RPM.

 

I was hoping for a lucky quick fix, but unfortunately I do recognize the noise and there is a circular nature to the sound suggesting it originates in the revolution of the fan blades. It looks like the Pro does not come with its own front fans, so you can't pop those back on to compare. I am looking at the photographs now and it appears to be a little cozy up there. How many of the drive bays do you think you will use? What happens when you take off the front air filer?

 

Usually this kind of thing is caused by the fan blades passing in close proximity to an object. The effect is greater with flatter blades. Are there any metal flanges that come close to the fan's intake space? It can also occur from motor resonance back into the case frame, but that is very hard distinction to make from an audio track. You might be able to feel it with your finger on the inside frame. There is a solution for this and there a ton of fans in the world, but we'll come back this later.

 

 

1500 RPM on the corsair fans is really loud for me hence why I set the 40 degree mark to be 900 RPM then anything hotter to start Rampling up abit. Ideally I'd like one fan curve for both summer and winter if that were possible so was trying to thong of temperature scenarios in both seasons here in Melbourne. Can my 30 degree 700 RPM be set lower?

 

You should never reach the 40C mark in Winter so that 1500 should not happen. You would have to run a stress test for hours and I am still not sure you would reach. I thought the 1500 would be sufficient to serve as an alarm function and saved the 2000 for holy ^$%@% shut down now! That also was with an eye toward fan replacement with the Redux which would be capped at 1425 or so of actual fan speed against the radiator.

 

All of these points are adjustable and there is no absolute 'you need this fan speed at this water temperature'. You can always slow them down and keep them at low levels, right until you become uncomfortable with the end CPU core temps. I usually keep my idle fan speeds in the 500-600 range and that becomes the baseline for my seasonal low temperature. So, if you standing water temp is more like 27C, adjust the scale to make that 500 rpm and then set 1500 for +15C higher. You should not go 15C above your idle water temp with any kind of normal load. Unfortunately, unless things have changed rather drastically in the last 16 years, your climate is rather variable. Rather than keep referring to these as Summer and Winter profiles, you may just want two with higher starting points above the balanced setting. Maybe one with a 27C=500 rpm starting point (42C=1500) and another at 33C=500, 48C=1500. Save them as presets. September may be 17C one day and 30C the next.

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Last question in regards to case fans, since I have a dual radiator cooling my CPU, are case fans actually required? I'm not saying I'm going to remove them but I'm just curious if they actually have any impact on the water/CPU temps? I'm just thinking, to avoid hearing this noise I can setup a custom fan profile for the 2 front fans to only operate between the 400-700RPM mark before I start hearing the annoying sound. From what I can see they are setup as intake to bring air in air so I guess to keep air moving its certainly a good idea to not completely switch them off.

 

Yes, you still need case fans but it is usually not necessary to blast them unless you are trying to apply direct cooling to some object just on the other side of the fan. The amount of air you exchange in and out of the case is prime in determining the overall internal ambient temperature. Not the hardware temps, but this is a large component in your starting water temperature, particularly at idle. So, a person with a 21C room temperature, but an idle 28C water temperature, is retaining a lot of internal heat and might do with more intake/exhaust case fan speeds. In a set-up like my Air 540 with no drive bays and fans covering most of the exterior surfaces, my internal temperature is usually only 2C over room temperature. So at idle, very slow fans speeds might cost 2-4C on the internal components. Absolutely does not matter. However, the problem is the heat scales with load and the GPUs will really add to the mix in gaming. The better question is how will 600 rpm fare during a gaming load? Try and find out.

 

However, I would not be content with the fans doing that and we will find a solution so it's not an issue. It may be that we need to try a different type of fan blade or move the fan off the frame with a rubber gasket, but I need to more info to find the right solution.

 

You can run a stress test, but pick something other than Prime 95 or Intel Burn Test. Yes, both are really good as producing CPU heat, but across the last several CPU generations from Haswell forward, you need to careful with your testing. Since it does not represent a realistic load for 99% of the people out there, all it does is deflate your joy surrounding the new system. Prime95 require a +0.10v boost to an otherwise stable overclock on both my HW-E CPUs. AIDA64 or Intel XTU will cover basic stability and comparatively are mild 100% load tests. OCCT is more difficult for stability, but as long as you don't run Linpack the heat output is reasonable. You can also use the ASUS Real Bench. I used to be rather critical of it, but I have changed my mind and it is a reasonable multi-purpose test that is one level of difficulty higher than AIDA without being as ridiculous as Prime or IBT. However, if you are already on the Windows 10 Anniversary Update, be careful of Real Bench. There is some sort of driver conflict yet to be remedied. It also has a GPU component, just FYI.

 

 

You can install AI Suite Fan expert for now to help make the case fan tinkering easier. Set Link not to run on start-up. It should retain your last known profile, however the LED lighting may reset to white. Ultimately, you will have to choose one or the other.

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How many of the drive bays do you think you will use? What happens when you take off the front air filer?

 

Usually this kind of thing is caused by the fan blades passing in close proximity to an object. The effect is greater with flatter blades. Are there any metal flanges that come close to the fan's intake space?

 

So I did some testing last night, I removed the front panel and grill/filter and the noise was still there. I even unplugged one fan at a time and tested that and they both still made the noise when operating one at a time. From what I can see there are no objects in the fans way. There are no HDD bays behind them. The only bay I have is the Optical Drive bay which I can remove but it's not really interfering with the fans (I can post some photos when I'm home tonight if you like). However, I have noticed that the fans have been installed in reverse, so the Noctua logo is facing in the case rather than on the outside. I assume this was done so the fans could become intake fans to pull air into my case. Someone has suggested reversing them but I'm concerned I will then have no intake and all fans will be exhaust which will generate a lot of negative pressure. I'd also have no direct cooling to the GPU and othe components to so probably not a good idea.

 

What I have done in the meantime is run the ASUS Fan Optimization tool in my BIOS. It has set really low manual speeds for my case fans which is good. I've looked at the manual profile for the Noctuas and they aren't setup to exceed 800RPM until like 70 degrees. So in the short term I guess this is a solution to my noise issue as I noticed it doesn't actually kick in until about the 800RPM mark. Furthermore, I read a review somewhere that the Noctua redux actually become loud (19db) after 800RPM so who knows what's going on there. I did some light gaming last night (world of Warcraft lol) and my water temps got up to about 33-34 degrees. my idel starting temp was about 22-23 degrees. Radiator fans didn't spin any fast than 700RPM with my profile so it was pretty quiet but I think I'll still eventually swap the rad fans for something quieter for summer. I'm assuming those temps are fine and there's no need to worry? I did have a few apps and streams running in the background to just to test it. Now just a question in relation to gaming, will temps vary depending on the game played and the demands of it? For example, if I play Witcher 3 which is super demanding vs World of Warcraft would i notice an increase in temps? I assume the answer is yes but thought I'd check.

 

You can install AI Suite Fan expert for now to help make the case fan tinkering easier. Set Link not to run on start-up. It should retain your last known profile, however the LED lighting may reset to white. Ultimately, you will have to choose one or the other.

If I setup Fan Xpert, adjust the profiles and what not, then uninstall to use CL will the profiles still remain the same? Otherwise I'll just continue to do it via the BIOS I guess. Thanks for all you help by the way, I really really appreciate it and I think we are nearing a final solution :)

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Until the situation forces you do otherwise, just FULLY exit either program before launching the other. If you uninstall AI Suite, you will have to do it all over again. It will be handy to have Fan Xpert for chasing down the case fan issue. The CPU is under control and we don't need link right now.

 

Ultimately, you may wish to link your case fan temps to the VRM temperature instead of CPU. It is a fairly even steady value that allows you set consistent fan speeds for gaming. CPU temps can be all over the place and anything, but once you figure your range for VRM, it is predictable and slow changing, like water temperature. Each platform and brand will have different temps, so you'll have to figure out yours. Your power phase control in the BIOS (also visible in AI Suite) has a strong effect on this. Use the "Optimized" setting. There is no reason not to unless you are trying to set overclock records. Overall, I usually consider Asus' tuning a bit off the mark for me. Obviously, it is easily changeable and the real value is you can drop DC fans rather to low speeds. In the BIOS you are stuck with a hefty 60% minimum speed. That alone is often worth the install unless you are all PWM.

 

Those front fans need to be intake. The pretty blade part of the fan should be facing out, with the Noctua label (and specs) on the interior. OK, no physical obstructions and no need to remove anything else. I can see the side mount rail and it does not look sufficient to cause this. It may be faster to chase this the other way, now that you have Fan Xpert installed. Take one of them off the case and leave it plugged into the board. Hold it in your hand and adjust the speed manually through Fan Xpert. If the noise is still there, then it is motor or design related and you now have two new radiator fans. We can then find you something else for the front.

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Ok cool - so fully exiting Corsair Link still keeps my profiles and such in tact right? Its just if I uninstall things will go back to default? I assume its the same with AI Suite?

 

I've just read somewhere that in order to use the profiles they need to run in the background or system tray but wasn't sure if this was true. Ideally, I'd like to just disable Corsair Link from startup and only open it when I need to change a profile or something. Can this be done?

 

Hold it in your hand and adjust the speed manually through Fan Xpert. If the noise is still there, then it is motor or design related and you now have two new radiator fans. We can then find you something else for the front.

 

I'll install and do this tonight when I get home from work. Only concern is, if the noise is still there then I'd be worried I might hear it if I mount these fans to my radiator too...

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I don't know if you will keep the custom curve after quitting Link. It may default back to quiet/balanced/performance, however re-launching will bring it back. For now, Quiet mode will serve your purposes while fan tuning if needed. AI Suite will keep the fan curve after you exit.
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I'm currently using the stock fans, but I have the previous model H110i GT. I have a pair of the new ML fans to fit on it, when I get around to it (hopefully this weekend) but in all honesty, removing and refitting water coolers is not high on the list of things I do for fun.

 

Until the latest version of Link I was unable to install it, now it installs but doesn't see my H110i GT, however my light is still blue from a previous installation, so it seems that the settings must stick around.

 

I have my cooler fans connected to my motherboard so I can control them from Fan Xpert as well.

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I'm currently using the stock fans, but I have the previous model H110i GT. I have a pair of the new ML fans to fit on it, when I get around to it (hopefully this weekend) but in all honesty, removing and refitting water coolers is not high on the list of things I do for fun.

 

Until the latest version of Link I was unable to install it, now it installs but doesn't see my H110i GT, however my light is still blue from a previous installation, so it seems that the settings must stick around.

 

I have my cooler fans connected to my motherboard so I can control them from Fan Xpert as well.

Yeah, I want to change my fans to but not to fond of the idea at the moment, we'll see what happens. Do let me know how you go with the ML fans though and if you notice a difference in noise with them.

 

OK, no physical obstructions and no need to remove anything else. I can see the side mount rail and it does not look sufficient to cause this. It may be faster to chase this the other way, now that you have Fan Xpert installed. Take one of them off the case and leave it plugged into the board. Hold it in your hand and adjust the speed manually through Fan Xpert. If the noise is still there, then it is motor or design related and you now have two new radiator fans. We can then find you something else for the front.

 

So I did the above, except through BIOS as I was in a bit of a hurry (had people over for dinner) and I can report back that there was no strange noise with the fan unmounted. Funnily enough, I even tried spinning both fans at full speed with one mounted and the other unmounted and I didn't hear the noise. I loosend the screws a little as they seemed a bit tight incase that was causing it to make funny noises but I haven't tested it since to be honest since my fan profiles are set quite low at the moment on the case fans meaning they hopefully wont spin past 800RPM. I think the real issue however is the case, I'll leave you with some images I took and you'll see what I mean. The frames the fans mount to are quite large and in one of the photos you'll see the blades clearly go over the top of them so I think when they spin up they are obviously trying to pass air through that small hole possibly causing the noise. Anyhow, now its time to start thinking about what radiator fans to get, I'm guessing the Noctua Redux 1500RPM PWM fans will be a good choice, thoughts?

 

Here are the images by the way: http://imgur.com/a/pwpIT

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Interesting. I think in some of the reviews for the case the fans were mounted on the inside of the frame, which the majority of the time would make it worse. In front should be better on most fans, unless the fan filter clamps down right on top of them.

 

Sometimes you get a strange interaction between a specific mounting position or case and a fan. It's just one of those things. That particular model is a bit of hybrid. Neither pure airflow design nor pressure. Sharp blades. I don't have anything exactly the same to compare it with.

 

Some things you can do to help determine a direction: 1) Move the rear fan to front intake temporarily and put one them on the rear. See if the sound is the same in back or if the Phantek makes a similar noise on the front. 2) Try out the Redux 1200 on the radiator now, before committing to the 1500 rpm model. It is the same fan with same blade. If it produces awful noise at 900 rpm, so will the other. You don't intend to invade the last few hundred RPM very often, so the 1200 model will make an effective demonstration model. It may make more sense to use that pair now as the cool season radiator set and find something different for the front of the case.

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