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H45 pump Noisy


hugheffo
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Hi

 

Just put in a H45 AIO Cooler in my Gigabyte Z3 Gaming system, and i have noticed that the pump is making a whining noise which is coming from the bottom of the radiator, where the hoses go in. I thought it might be the fan, but i disconnected the Fan and the noise still remains.

 

The Pump is connected to the CPU fan header, and the Fan is connected to the CPU_OPT header.

 

I've checked the RPM of the pump and it's running around 4500rpm all the time.

 

Is there a way of quieting the pump down.

 

Cooling is fine 23oC at Idle and 64oC fully loaded (6700K O/C @ 4.6Ghz)

 

Just the whining noise that is driving me mad.

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It sounds like pump whine and it is quite irritating. Unfortunately, the H45 is fairly new and of a different design than the other coolers. I don't know very much about it, but I suspect the pump is not speed adjustable and needs 12v all the time, which it probably is getting to reach 4500 rpm. I would start a service ticket through the tech help page (you need to create an account). See what they have to say and that is also the first step toward replacing the cooler. The buzz/whine stuff is too annoying to live with and it should not be audible over the system and room noise.
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Hi

 

Just put in a H45 AIO Cooler in my Gigabyte Z3 Gaming system, and i have noticed that the pump is making a whining noise which is coming from the bottom of the radiator, where the hoses go in. I thought it might be the fan, but i disconnected the Fan and the noise still remains.

 

The Pump is connected to the CPU fan header, and the Fan is connected to the CPU_OPT header.

 

I've checked the RPM of the pump and it's running around 4500rpm all the time.

 

Is there a way of quieting the pump down.

 

Cooling is fine 23oC at Idle and 64oC fully loaded (6700K O/C @ 4.6Ghz)

 

Just the whining noise that is driving me mad.

 

I am testing both the H60 and the H45 and the H45 pump indeed has this high pitch noise, which is audible in idle. Then I tested both outside the case, only with the pump connected to the motherboard (both at 12v) and the H45 still makes this high pitch noise. Does not sound like a defective unit or coil whine. It sounds like regular pump noise. The problem is - the H60 pump is basically dead silent -- you need to get really close to hear anything.

 

One advice -- you can set the PWM to "silent" for the H45 fan. I have been doing tests and you are going to lose +- 1ºC, but the noise is significantly reduced. But the pump noise will continue in the background.

 

Maybe there is a turnaround for this, but my wild guess is that the pump is actually noisy. This unit was made to be affordable -- and the price is indeed way lower than the H60.

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Thanks for the Advice. I changed the speed profile using thee Gigabyte SIV app, and set the pump to run at 3000rpm, and it is now silent. I think that at 100% speed 4500rpm is just too fast, and with the lower speed the CPU seems to run cooler, 23oC at Idle and 63oC at max load (6700K O/C @ 4.6Ghz)
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Thanks for the Advice. I changed the speed profile using thee Gigabyte SIV app, and set the pump to run at 3000rpm, and it is now silent. I think that at 100% speed 4500rpm is just too fast, and with the lower speed the CPU seems to run cooler, 23oC at Idle and 63oC at max load (6700K O/C @ 4.6Ghz)

 

The suggestion was to reduce the fan rotation changing the PWM profile from normal to silent, not the pump. From what people say, to run the pump at lower speeds can cause wear and failures down the line.

 

But I agree that the pump noise of the H45 is unbearable. I am just not sure if it is a good idea to leave it below 12v. On this regard you are in between the rock and the hard place...

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  • 2 weeks later...
Thanks for the Advice. I changed the speed profile using thee Gigabyte SIV app, and set the pump to run at 3000rpm, and it is now silent. I think that at 100% speed 4500rpm is just too fast, and with the lower speed the CPU seems to run cooler, 23oC at Idle and 63oC at max load (6700K O/C @ 4.6Ghz)

 

I wrote to Corsair support and they only advise 12v for the pump to avoid wear and tear. He said that if the noise is that bad they can only suggest a replacement. I would RMA the unit.

 

By the way I tested my pump at 3/4 speed and indeed the noise is gone. In average the increased temperature is of only 1ºC. I also tested with a quieter fan, in this case an XtraFlo120 or even a Boreas 120 and the loss was also of only 1ºC. Maybe an SP120 HP will keep the temperatures and it is way quieter.

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  • 3 years later...

That's interesting what you discuss here, I also got an H45 one for a long time. Also on a gigabyte board (GA-Z97M-D3H) and just installed the SIV to check some fan speed issues I had (different subject). Tried then changing the RPM forcibly pulling it to low RPM and then to high RPM. No noise difference (I don't really notice any annoying noise from the pump!).

 

Interesting thing is the result when I run its calibration, I get the following table of RPM-per workload:

 

No code has to be inserted here.

 

The pump is plugged at CPU_FAN jack (yes, I'm going to fix that) and the fan (and other fans) are plugged to the different SYS_FAN jacks throughout the motherboard, and they all obey the workload-versus-rpm settings; I'm not sure whats up, but it looks as if the H45 has some "masking" RPM display and somehow maintains its pumping no matter what PWM (workload) we apply to the pump jack.

 

EDIT: After taking out the cooler, giving the old radiator and fan a good vacuum and cleanup, then plugging all back to the right places, then re-running gigabyte's smart fan another calibration, I get progressive RPM rates from the pump. Hopefully this translates into fluid flow in the pump somehow.

 

So, updated table became:

 

No code has to be inserted here.

 

Yet, corsair recommendation should be followed, I believe. Taking the pump to lower values (or turning it off) corretly triggered motherboard alarm (for 0rpm) and also temperature picked up at low pump rates, so the pump really goes "slower" as we push the gauge down. I don't know, but I really feel compelled to let the pump work at least at half power when the computer is idle -- yet, must bear in mind pump power will be tied to system temperature, not CPU's.

Edited by avengerx
update "rpm" per workload table after changes.
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  • 7 months later...

Changing the voltage volte for less noise is a bad idea. I also have this acute problem.

Listen:

https://cos.tv/videos/play/24720996739355648

 

Here it is tested away from the PC, to show the noise at a distance when there is no noise in the room and neither in the fan.

https://cos.tv/videos/play/24722096483243008

 

So this noise is 4200 rpm, this speed is only for extreme use of a game for example. And, you will hardly hear it, because the game sound will be louder while playing.

 

I show you in picture where I could find this in the bios.

Thus, on the Asus AI Suite 3 software it now indicates at 2100 RPM on average at low frequency PC use (use without streaming or playing games).

 

1708

20201210.jpg

 

The information indicated:

Auto: Automatic selection of the operating mode according to the type of processor fan detected.

DC Mode: Enables Q-FAN feature support for chassis fans with 3 pins.

PWM Mode: Enables Q-FAN feature support for chassis fans with 4 pins.

Disable: Disables the Q-FAN feature

 

It is therefore necessary to select automatic.

 

It is therefore necessary to change only this part in the bios. Never change the voltage when you are not professional and when you do not know the electricity for computers, without knowing exactly what to expect.

Edited by dubignyp
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