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Will the Corsair Hydro Series H115i (280) fit in the Carbide 400c?


leakymutant
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I just want to make sure it fits because it says it can fit the H110 but I heard they were the same cooler just updated name or something, any info?

 

Also what Hydro cooler is in the 400c on the corsair website? It looks like the 280mm H115i with 140mm SP fans but I cant tell? I want to do a similar build with the hydro and 400c?

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The 280mm coolers (H110/H110i/GT/H115i) are front mount only on the 400C. All the promo shots on the product page are the H115 model with 4xSP140 LED (white) in push-pull on the radiator. Ironically, you cannot use the H115 to control those DC motor fans and they must be powered and controlled from the motherboard. That is a viable option, but be aware ahead of time.

 

Some name changing went on not too long after the original release. The H110GT became the H110i. The H110 GTX became the H115i. There are quite a few threads detailing the differences, all of which pertain to firmware, the number of fan controllers, and the obvious cosmetic differences. No real known differences between the H110GT and H110i, but I would not pick up the H110 GTX even at a few dollars less than the H115i. We keep discovering small improvements and at this point you likely can find a H115i more readily anyway.

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Ok I'm going to get the same cooling set up then (front mount). Im also getting the same mother board Asus Max.

 

so when you said that I cant control the fans from the cooler? What does that mean? Do I just operate the fans via mother board like you said? whats the difference ?

 

This is my first build

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so when you said that I cant control the fans from the cooler? What does that mean? Do I just operate the fans via mother board like you said? whats the difference ?

 

Ultimately, not too much. The Corsair coolers that are Link software capable (the "i" in the name) have a program for fan control. This system alters the fan speed based on the water temperature inside the cooler, not the CPU core temperature. This is the most efficient form of control in terms of most cooling for lowest fan speeds. Fans always remove heat from the water, not the CPU directly. In order for this to work, the fans are connected and powered from the pump block. Power is supplied to the pump via SATA cable (and your PSU) rather than from a motherboard header. Any fan used in this system must be a 4 pin PWM fan. There is a gigantic, gaping hole in the market where 140mm PWM LED fans should be. There are none as I write this, although Corsair is moving their ML fan series to market. The new ML140 LED appears to be a 4 pin PWM fan. Release point is still unknown.

 

For everyone else in the world with a normal water cooled system, we adjust our fan speed based on CPU temperature. This is still effective, but you will run the fans slightly more than needed. More accurately, the fans will react sooner than needed to temperature changes. This is not a big deal for most people, although my CPU fans are even more reactive under Windows 10 and my Asus BIOS. Your future motherboard will have 5 fan headers, all of which can control 3 pin DC or 4 pin PWM fans. You simply plug the fans into the board as you always have.

 

The SP140 LED in the photographs are 3 pin DC and their voltage is increased or decreased to control speed. Note, this will also decrease the LED lighting. The new ML140 LED, if they are PWM, will emit a constant glow regardless of speed since they always receive 12v. That might be something worth waiting for since the 400C does not come with enough fans to get you running out of the box.

 

Normally, I don't advocate using fans on both sides of the radiator on a 280mm system. Generally, it is a bad trade in terms of noise and hassle for minimal temperature gain. However, this case may be an exception. The front intake will be your only source of new air. One advantage push-pull has is a superior ability to move air through the radiator at lower speeds. Specifically with the SP140 LED, I believe this is worth the effort and you should have the space. It should allow you to keep fan speeds below 1000 rpm at load and while still delivering a decent supply of air through the radiator. It is unknown if the new ML140 LED benefit from doubling up.

 

There are some drawbacks to using the radiator in the front position. Someone else asked about this today and I responded with my opinion here.

Edited by c-attack
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Alright sweet thanks for the detail defiantly clears things up. I went ahead and bought the 115i with an additional 2 SP 140mm for front and 2 AF 140mm for top ill just keep the 120mm in back for now. Yeah I agree I feel like the push pull in the case will work better to get air moving faster through out the case with out causing to much heat to hurt the parts inside.
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You probably will want to pick up a pair of long splitters for the front 4 fans. You can run them from the CHA_FAN headers on the front edge of the board, but something needs to be on CPU_FAN and there are some benefits to running the radiator fans from the CPU & OPT headers at the top of board (tighter control intervals) and the OPT header will be wasted otherwise. You might as well get 4 pin PWM spliiters since these work for both 3/4 pin, whereas the 3 pin splitter will be 3 pin DC only. The SP140 doesn't have a very long cable, but a 7-10 inch splitter should give you lots of wiggle room.
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Ok I'll get 2 x 4 pin PWM splitters. So the splitters make it so I can access the cooler link feature or just to give me more extension either way I will do it just want to be clear. I think there is going to be a total of 7 fans. 1x 120mm in back. 2 140mm on top and 4 x 140mm push pull on rad. So will i have to program the fans at all? Or just plug them into mother board and it runs a default setting for fan speed and cooling?
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The splitters are necessary to put 4 fans on two headers, whichever you choose. You will need the length if you want to put them on the CPU & OPT headers. You won't if you use the front CHA headers. It's very irritating to get stuck mid-build when a cable won't reach, so I wanted to warn you ahead of time. Asus has some default fan profiles in the BIOS and you can set custom curves within it as well. You also have the option of using AI Suite as desktop software fan control. Most people use it to start as they get familiar with the board. Whether you keep it long term is up to you. It has multiple fan control options as well.

 

You will not use the LINK system for fan control, but you will need to attach the USB header to the motherboard and a SATA cable for power to the pump. This will enable you to launch the program, change LED color, and then exit the program. You will not need it for control and it is not my first choice for monitoring unless you have a lot of Corsair hardware.

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Ah got it, but what's the difference between all the fan headers CPU OPT CHA etc? I want to same air flow config. in the 400c picture on there website. should I put all 4 fans on the radiator and connect them to CPU and OPT headers and the dual 140mm AF to the CHA header (assuming you can connect two fans to one header with the 4 pin pmw extender right?) Thanks for the help be the way I just want to make sure I get it right the first time haha
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Motherboard headers have a 1.0A limit. This not something you want to get close to. 0.95A is too risky. That said, all of the fan we are discussing can be be run 2 to 1 motherboard header and will be well below the limit. The amperage is on the back of the fan, but it is not absolute.

 

The control differences between CPU and CHA headers are small. In the BIOS, they appear the same, but there are some hidden differences. The CPU fan header can be set to shorter fan spin up/down delays (1.2, 2.4, 3.6, 5 seconds). Chassis fans go 0, 12, 25, 50s. This actually doesn't matter for water cooling very much, unlike an air tower. More importantly is how the OS and BIOS treat the CPU fan. On Win 10 you are going to get a lot of quick spin ups, no matter what you set the delay to. You must have a fan on CPU to boot. If you put the top fans on CPU, the BIOS will treat them as if they are the CPU cooling fans. Fast changes, cycling up and down. Not needed or desired on a roof fan. On the radiator it is at least doing something when it happens. Also, you can't shut the CPU fans down. It might be desirable to momentarily stop your top exhaust fans at idle or during quiet desktop work. Not so desirable for the radiator fans. Again, this is a little thing, but something that can be planned for.

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sweet got it so last thing. can you confirm that I will plug all 4 radiator fans into the 2 fan headers coming off the cpu cooler block using the 2 x 4 pin PMW extender.

 

Also should I plug the cpu block link into the CPU_header on mobo or the power supply? I saw somewhere you should plug it in the power supply to get a constant 12 volt current to the cpu cooler.

 

Thanks

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Yes, you should plug the four front fans into the 4 ends of the splitter - one on each end. Then run the 2 single ends of the 2 splitters back to CPU and OPT. I would put the fans on one side of the radiator on one splitter and the other pair on another. This is not critical at all, but sometimes it is useful to disable the fans on one side of the radiator or the other momentarily.

 

The pin lead that comes from the pump block on the 115i is a motherboard sensor. Since you won't be using LINK for control and we have something on CPU_FAN to prevent boot error, it doesn't do much. I would stick on your water pump header to keep it out of the way and you won't be using that header for anything else right now.

 

The power for this cooler does come from the PSU, but using a SATA cable. This is the same cable you use to power hard drives and DVD players. Often PSU cables have multiple connections on a single line. You can use any of those. If not, you will need to grab another from your PSU cable bag. This will provide a 12v load to cooler at all times without any further setting changes.

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Then run the 2 single ends of the 2 splitters back to CPU and OPT.

 

Wait so dont plug in the 4 fans using the splitters into the the 2 fan pin headers that are attached to the cpu cooler block? plug them into the CPU and OPT instead. Then plug the 4 pin female connector (coming off the cpu block) into the PSU using a SATA cable to get a constant 12v supply to cooler. Which I think will work because Im using a fully mod. PSU.

 

So if I'm not mistaken just stick the 2 fan pin headers that come off the cpu block to the side because I wont be using them.

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1) Yes, just tuck the two 4 pin fan connectors that come from the block off to the side. Running 3 pin DC fans from there will cause all four fans run at max speed all the time.

 

2) The power will come from the flat, wider SATA connector. The 3 pin looking plug does not provide power on this cooler. On the H115i, it reports fan speed and since you won't have any fans on the H115i's controller, it doesn't have much use. You could just tuck it away as well, although it is probably just as easy to stick on the water pump header.

 

3) You do want to connect the USB mini plug to the block and to the board. It will be needed for some lighting control options.

 

http://imagescdn.tweaktown.com/content/7/3/7320_11_corsair-hydro-h110i-gtx-high-performance-liquid-cpu-cooler-review.jpg

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ah got it!

 

Can I plug in the 2x AF140mm (on top) into the unused 2x 4 pin fan connector coming off the block instead? or should I just plug those into a CHA fan header using a third splitter. I would assume the CHA header to give me more control, even though I will probably leave those running all the time to keep air moving.

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Find a CHA header for them. They can also go on a splitter, if you have any left. Don't put them on the block connectors. The h115 will try to run them based on water temperature.

 

Ok sweet thanks man for the help it would have been such a pain come time to build not knowing all this.

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  • 4 weeks later...
Ultimately, not too much. The Corsair coolers that are Link software capable (the "i" in the name) have a program for fan control. This system alters the fan speed based on the water temperature inside the cooler, not the CPU core temperature. This is the most efficient form of control in terms of most cooling for lowest fan speeds. Fans always remove heat from the water, not the CPU directly. In order for this to work, the fans are connected and powered from the pump block. Power is supplied to the pump via SATA cable (and your PSU) rather than from a motherboard header. Any fan used in this system must be a 4 pin PWM fan. There is a gigantic, gaping hole in the market where 140mm PWM LED fans should be. There are none as I write this, although Corsair is moving their ML fan series to market. The new ML140 LED appears to be a 4 pin PWM fan. Release point is still unknown.

 

For everyone else in the world with a normal water cooled system, we adjust our fan speed based on CPU temperature. This is still effective, but you will run the fans slightly more than needed. More accurately, the fans will react sooner than needed to temperature changes. This is not a big deal for most people, although my CPU fans are even more reactive under Windows 10 and my Asus BIOS. Your future motherboard will have 5 fan headers, all of which can control 3 pin DC or 4 pin PWM fans. You simply plug the fans into the board as you always have.

 

The SP140 LED in the photographs are 3 pin DC and their voltage is increased or decreased to control speed. Note, this will also decrease the LED lighting. The new ML140 LED, if they are PWM, will emit a constant glow regardless of speed since they always receive 12v. That might be something worth waiting for since the 400C does not come with enough fans to get you running out of the box.

 

Normally, I don't advocate using fans on both sides of the radiator on a 280mm system. Generally, it is a bad trade in terms of noise and hassle for minimal temperature gain. However, this case may be an exception. The front intake will be your only source of new air. One advantage push-pull has is a superior ability to move air through the radiator at lower speeds. Specifically with the SP140 LED, I believe this is worth the effort and you should have the space. It should allow you to keep fan speeds below 1000 rpm at load and while still delivering a decent supply of air through the radiator. It is unknown if the new ML140 LED benefit from doubling up.

 

There are some drawbacks to using the radiator in the front position. Someone else asked about this today and I responded with my opinion here.

 

You should NOT let the fans control the CPU temp with Corsair liquid cooler. there is no reason to do that. the fans control the temp of the water and by that cools the CPU. You will NOT notice a difference how cool the CPU is by using the fan headers on motherboard. The only thing you will get is fans spinning up and down all the time and they will be very noisy.

 

The way the cooler is meant to be installed is by using the fan headers on the radiator and the Sata connection. In Corsair Link you set the fans to balanced and the pump to performance. That's the best way to have a cool CPU and quite fans.

 

I have a Skylake build I7 6700 overclocked to 4.6 hgz. My temps when idle are 28-30 degrees. When playing games the max temps are 45-47 degrees. That's the water temps. My CPU Temps (package) is the same as the water temp +- 2-4 degrees. So I have a cool CPU and quite fans. I can hear the fans when playing games (Rise Of Tomb Raider on max settings) but I have to sit very close to my computer to hear the fans spinning. Oh, And i have replaced the stock fans with Corsair ML 140 Pro fans. These fans works just great and very quite.

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You should NOT let the fans control the CPU temp with Corsair liquid cooler. there is no reason to do that.

 

I have read a number of your statements and this is one of the worst ones.

 

c-attack is proposing connecting the radiator fans to the CPU_FAN + CPU_OPT headers rather than the cooler fan controller.

 

Had you been a forum member for more then 5 minutes you would realise c-attack talks sense and I suspect you don't.

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Ok sweet thanks man for the help it would have been such a pain come time to build not knowing all this.

 

You should NOt be listening to this rubbish!

 

The right way to install this cooler is by letting the fans control the water temps. That's how a liquid cooler works. There is a reason why Corsair provides 2 fan headers on the radiator and a Sata power connection. They are meant to be cooling the water and by that cools the CPU.

 

If you listen to the rubbish you will get fans spinning up and down all the time trying to keep up with the CPU temps. Very noisy and not the way you use a liquid cooler. A liquid cooler cools the water ( that's why it's called a liquid cooler) and by that the water keeps the CPU cool.

"leakymutant" doesn't have a clue on how a liquid cooler works and how to connect it. He just trying to be smart. His knowledge is poor.

 

If you follow my advise, you will have a cool CPU and quite fans.

 

In corsair link you set your fans to balanced and the waterpump to performance. And group your fans to H115i (NOT CPU)

That's it.

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I have read a number of your statements and this is one of the worst ones.

 

c-attack is proposing connecting the radiator fans to the CPU_FAN + CPU_OPT headers rather than the cooler fan controller.

 

Had you been a forum member for more then 5 minutes you would realise c-attack talks sense and I suspect you don't.

 

WHAT??? Read here, c-attack wrote: " you are looking to see if the cooler is working properly, we need your approximate room temperature, your H115i Temp (water temperature) from the LINK application at idle, and keep an eye on that reading. You water temp should be slow to change".

 

If his fans were connected to the motherboard headers c-attack wouldn't suggest to read the water temps. You are making things up.

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WHAT??? Read here, c-attack wrote: " you are looking to see if the cooler is working properly, we need your approximate room temperature, your H115i Temp (water temperature) from the LINK application at idle, and keep an eye on that reading. You water temp should be slow to change".

 

If his fans were connected to the motherboard headers c-attack wouldn't suggest to read the water temps. You are making things up.

 

No, you have failed to understand what c-attack said. Further from your initial post I had no idea as to what in c-attacks post you were referring to.

 

Rather than saying someone is incorrect I advice you to say you are confused by what was specified, say why and ask for clarification.

 

The outcome will be the same and you will cause less conflict.

 

On a technical point you have failed to fully specify you PC specifications so advise you do this. With Windows 10 you need to specify the build number as there are three totally different releases and even more insider builds.

Edited by red-ray
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You should NOT let the fans control the CPU temp with Corsair liquid cooler. there is no reason to do that. the fans control the temp of the water and by that cools the CPU. You will NOT notice a difference how cool the CPU is by using the fan headers on motherboard. The only thing you will get is fans spinning up and down all the time and they will be very noisy.

 

The way the cooler is meant to be installed is by using the fan headers on the radiator and the Sata connection. In Corsair Link you set the fans to balanced and the pump to performance. That's the best way to have a cool CPU and quite fans.

 

You should re-read the post you cited in your first response. All of your points were noted and explained. However, the critical underlying issue is this was advice for how to connect the SP140 LED series fan -- a 3 pin DC fan. You cannot control it from the pump block, unless you like maximum speed all the time. DC fans must be powered and controlled from the motherboard, fan controller, or some other source.

 

The then unreleased ML140 Pro LED (PWM) fans were specifically mentioned and their advantages stated. Whether that is worth and extra $20/fan over an SP140 LED, is up to the individual.

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  • 3 years later...

I am about to embark on this for the very first time so bare with me

 

i have a carbide 400c and having read (skimmed) the thread i can see its comaptible with the H115i. Some questions:

 

Accepting that Push/Pull is a given and i watched this [ame]

[/ame]

 

  • Will any Corsair 140mm fans will do?
     
  • As i have to do Push/Pull can i use a fan splitter to split the 2 connectors into 4 so i can "control" all 4 fans via the H115i?
     
  • If not can i have 2 fans running directly off the PSU (as they are now for air cooling) and run the other 2 off the H115i?

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