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H100i V2 + 6600K + Asus Z170i Pro Gaming high temps


jfunk

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Just put this guy together, and the CPU is hitting 70c in Prime95 @ 4.2Ghz.

 

Ambient temp 23c.

 

This seems very high compared to what I've seen reported. The radiator is completely cool to the touch.

 

PWM CPU fan header set to manual/100%. Fans running off of 380T controller and at 100%.

 

I can't hand tighten the block down any more and it makes no difference if I manually apply pressure downward on it.

 

In Corsair Link, the H100 is reported at 30-31c, much cooler than the CPU.

 

I did not replace the TIM, just left the factory stuff on there.

 

Any thoughts?

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Have you checked the VCore setting mine was running at 1.42V at 4.4Ghz, The recommended is 1.35 (or less if it works). Dropping it down dropped the temp by about 6 degrees.

Prime 95 is not a particularly good test as, I believe, it boost the voltage. I usually make a note of the idle temp, then use it, play a game etc with some monitoring software in the background and see how it goes.

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Hmm, according to CPU-Z my voltage is topping out at 1.376 when I hit 4.2. Not much over 1.35, but I could try turning it down.

 

Still waiting for my 1070 which should arrive today, so I haven't been able to test and real world gaming yet.

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I am not sure what you are comparing you data to, but I suspect it isn't another Skylake CPU and Prime95. If you haven't had one of the more recent CPUs, Prime95 + AVX instructions + adaptive voltage leads to very high temperatures. Prime can be configured to run in more limited and specific ways, but it takes some doing and it is no longer the standard to which others are compared. Personally, I think 70C is pretty good for 1.37v and I suspect you have been victimized by all three circumstances mentioned above.

 

If there was a problem with the cooler, the test would be untenable, so don't spend any time remounting cooler or chasing ghosts. 1.35v is a lot for 4.2, although I don't own a Skylake and will leave the OC guidance to someone else. The voltage overshoot is common on many of the stress test programs when on the AUTO voltage. You may wish to set it to a fixed level while benchmarking and/or use a less greedy test like AIDA64 or Intex XTU. As you only just broke 70C at a peg or two from the maximum sane voltage on your chip, I would say you are in good shape with your cooling and can move on or refine your BIOS settings.

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Thanks, makes sense. I didn't tweak any settings other than just turning up max multiplier to 42, so maybe the high voltage is to blame. I was just going by a couple reviews I pulled up quickly to see what ballpark I should be in, but I probably should have paid more attention to specifics on them as I might not be comparing apples to apples.

 

Obviously, I won't be running Prime95 too often, so as long as this doesn't sound out of the ordinary, I don't really care. Not looking to set any records or push the envelop, just taking what "free" performance there is to be had.

 

This is my first water cooler, so I just want to make sure, but it's normal for the cpu block temp to be that low (30c) while the hottest core is 70-71c? And it's normal for the radiator to be completely cool to the touch? I cannot detect even the slightest warmth from it with my hand.

 

It does "feel" like there is water moving through the hoses when I hold them.

 

Thanks much for the advice.

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This is good. The results you saw are the byproduct of the test and the Auto voltage doing whatever it needs to to keep stable. In this case, a voltage swing up 1.37v. That is probably enough to run 4.5 or 4.6GHz. Techically, 4.5@1.37v will draw more watts through the CPU than 4.2@1.37, but it is still an effective demonstration of cooling power and the very end of the voltage spectrum for 24/7 use.

 

As for the cooler itself, cold H100v2 Temp is good. It means the unit was effectively removing heat from the system as fast as it was added from the CPU. Your H100v2 Temp in Link is the water temperature inside the system. This value depends on a few things. 1) Room temperature. You are going to have warmer values in Summer and colder starting values in Winter as your room temp changes, unless you are lucky enough to be tropical. This also represents the floor, or lowest possible CPU temp you can achieve. 2) The value will increase as heat is added to the system -- both CPU waste transmitted directly into the stream and also other internal waste heat will raise the water temp as well, like a GPU. If it's 20C in your room but 23C inside the case where the radiator is located, the base temp will be 23C + CPU waste heat. Most people have a standing water temperature of 4-9C above their room temperature, but this is very situational and the case, placement, and other environmental factors have a say.

 

The fan speed has an impact on the water temperature and not much else. This is also why the fan speed is linked to this value by default. You can change it CPU temp on some coolers, but it does not change how the system really works. You can blast your fans all you want at idle, but you cannot decrease the water temp beyond the case ambient temperature. The same is true at load. You can blast your fans, but you cannot decrease your CPU temp from 70 to 50C. You can only decrease the water temp back to its original starting point. So if your starting water temp pre-load was 23C and it climbs up to 30C, the most you can reduce the temperature with fans is 7C. This is your water delta. Nothing is 100% efficient, so you won't be able to get all the way back down to 23C, but this hopefully indicates you don't need to blast the fans in most load situations. There are only small reductions to be had -- something usually not significant until you get close to your limits.

 

Unlike the water delta, your CPU core temperature delta (current CPU temp minus water temperature) is attributable to one thing -- voltage. There are other factors such as heat transmission through the block, TIM, the CPU itself. However, these really are not changeable values and the amount of voltage is the only thing you can readily tweak. So, theoretically if you have a core temp value of 70C and a water temp value of 30C with fans at maximum, you have two choices for reducing temperature. 1) Reduce the voltage. This will lower the core temp directly; 2) Reduce the temperature of the whole room. You may be laughing at that last bit, but for people who overclocking to the limit, it and unwilling to change their voltage (and reduce clock frequency), cooling off the room is the most effective thing you can do. It generally works better than pursuing extreme fan speeds. Regardless, a 40C delta over water temp is within normal ranges for high voltage and again, the CPU and your settings matter. We know this was near the maximum voltage you would ever use with about 10C to spare. This means you could run those settings up with a water temperature of about 40C before it became concerning.

 

So, is your 30C normal/abnormal/good/bad? What is your room temperature and/or case temperature when you ran that? Even without knowing, I doubt it was 15C in your room and this appears to be an excellent result. Moreover, in the default setting the fans would not run anywhere near maximum at 30C water temp (usually 100% starts at 40C), so you still had cooling power in reserve.

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Thanks much for the detailed explanation. I guess I was just thrown off by the relative lack of heat that seems to exist within the H100i system itself.

 

I'll back the voltage down a bit to keep things cooler. Now I wish I could turn down those H100 fans even further. At the lowest setting on the 380T fan controller, they're still the loudest thing in my room and apparently they don't need to be running nearly so loud to get the job done.

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So the radiator fans are on a controller and not the H100iV2 pump block? You can run them from a fan controller and it will be functional, but it might require more fiddling than you like. If powered from the block, they will run in accordance with water temp. Default value at 30C water temp will be pretty reasonable. You also can set custom curves to your specific needs. Quiet mode will cap them 1350-1400 rpm regardless of water temp. That might an easy solution and requires no additional headers.
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Yeah, I had read a lot of bad stuff about Link, so my initial plan was to avoid it entirely. I have a front 200mm bitfenix spectra pro attached to the mobo header, and connected both the H100 and the rear exhaust fans to the controller, figuring I can just turn them up from low manually should the need arise.

 

However, once I installed Link so I could change the LED light color, I saw that the pump was not running at max RPM even though I have the mobo cpu header manually set to 100%. It seems the LED light will reset itself to white on a cold boot too, until Link starts. So since it looks like I have to run Link regardless, I may go ahead and try moving the H100 fans over.

 

I guess at that point I should move the rear exhaust fan to the remaining mobo header too and just ignore the fan controller completely.

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If you connect the cpu fans to the cpu_fan and opt headers on your motherboard and the pump to the cpu_pump header (I'm assuming tht your motherboard has one), you can control the fans using the Asus Fan Xpert software. If you connect your case fans to the motherboard headers you can also control them so that they don't spin at all, below a certain temp.
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The newer coolers have a PWM pump and two speeds, usually referred to in Link as Quiet and Performance Mode. Don't worry about this too much. The flow rate will not be the limiting factor on your CPU and a double radiator. My preference would be for Quiet mode at all times until something forced a change, but you can make the decision based on noise -- if it can be heard. All of us on the previous generation of coolers get by just fine with pump speeds slower than quiet mode.

 

If you decide you don't want Link anymore, make sure you set the pump speed and fan mode to what you want before uninstalling, although it would make more sense to leave it and set it not to run on start-up. It should retain those settings, although LED lights are always software controlled. You don't have to use Link and powering and controlling the fans from the board or fan controller will be effective. Most people start to get frazzled with Link when operating in abnormal situations, usually very warm ones from a tropical environment or a lot of GPU waste heat. Your situation appears to be quite cool and the fans should run along mostly unnoticed. The fans that come with the cooler are designed for the radiator, but that design is always going to make them the loudest fans in the case and certainly with a 2400 RPM limit. If this becomes too tiresome, they can be replaced with something with a slightly lower rpm limit and a slightly more relaxed blade design. It will not move as much air the lowest fan speeds, but in the middle to upper ranges it should be close enough to not lose meaningful performance.

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You are fine, OP. I have the 6600k overclocked to 4.5Ghz (1.26v) and if I run the newer versions of Prime95, I hit almost 80°C with an H115i (280mm). The problem is the AVX instructions that P95 uses (same with any stress test that taps AVX). There's nothing wrong with AVX, it's just that for some reason Intel CPU's run hot when computing AVX. (I've read that Intel CPU's raise the voltage when AVX is ran). If you want a more realistic stress test, run AIDA64. Most likely you will find your temps around 60°C.

 

Also, look into manually overclocking. Don't rely on the "Auto" settings in the BIOS because most motherboards will take liberty to crank the voltage up more than the CPU needs. Doing this takes a while and is tedious, but is worth it in the end.

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Looks like I can drop my voltage further then, I'm hitting 4,4Ghz with 1.35V on a 6600K. I wasn't sure what to use so I started with 1.35V that was recommended for a 6700K overclocked to 4,5.

 

Some chips might need around 1.3v for 4.4Ghz. It's the silicon lottery. You'll have to experiment and see what the lowest voltage you need to remain stable.

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