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H110i GT Fans / Seating


WizPip

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First question:

I've had the H110i GT running for a year now and the SP140L fans on it seem to be making a bit of a rotational noise. Wind noise I can tolerate, but you can hear them turning. I don't know if they're just wearing out, but on idle I'd quite like it to be silent. This is at any RPM, even down to 500. Anyone have recommendations for silent 140mm fans I can replace them with?

 

Second:

I know the 4790K is a bit angry with its temperatures, but it loves to jump very quickly; it can go from idling at 35C to being loaded at 75C within a second. Although the H110i GT reacts to this, it doesn't seem to be particularly quickly - the temperature of the unit climbs slowly. Is this just because the H110i can't bring it below 75 regardless whilst it's loaded? The CPU is never thermally throttled so it's not a huge problem, I'm just curious if this is a standard reaction or if the cooler should draw more of the heat away more quickly from the CPU.

 

Thanks!

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I have a 6600K overclocked to 4.4 Ghz, cooled By an H110i GT. It idles at mid to high 20's and even when gaming (Fallout 4 at 4K) it never goes above 60.

 

I bought 2 quiet, brown fans to replace the stock fans on the H110i GT but I haven't installed them yet, as a) the stock ones seem to be working ok and b) I can't be bothered to uninstall the rad.

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I have a 6600K overclocked to 4.4 Ghz, cooled By an H110i GT. It idles at mid to high 20's and even when gaming (Fallout 4 at 4K) it never goes above 60.

 

The 6600K is a much cooler CPU than the 4790K, so this doesn't surprise me.

 

I bought 2 quiet, brown fans to replace the stock fans on the H110i GT but I haven't installed them yet, as a) the stock ones seem to be working ok and b) I can't be bothered to uninstall the rad.

 

How old is your H110i GT? I don't remember mine being particularly noisy until a few weeks ago...

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Remember the fans can only help remove heat from the water. They can't cool the CPU directly and you don't need the fans to react to CPU spikes. The water can hold a certain amount of heat. The heat transmission through the cold plate and into the water will do the work. This is one of the advantages of water cooling -- you don't need the fans to react to massive load that comes when you change your theme in Windows 10.

 

Look at your starting water temperature in C-Link before you game/load and then the peak value. That delta represents the possible reduction in temperature from blasting your fans, although a 100% reduction isn't necessarily realistic. So if baseline water temp is 27C and load temp is 37C, you can only reduce your CPU temps by 10C with strong fan speeds. The water temperature is the baseline CPU temperature, for our purposes.

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Remember the fans can only help remove heat from the water. They can't cool the CPU directly and you don't need the fans to react to CPU spikes.

 

I don't have my fans set to react to the CPU temperature, only the water temperature

 

The water can hold a certain amount of heat. The heat transmission through the cold plate and into the water will do the work.

 

Quite, but I find it odd that a CPU under load can go from registering 35C one second to 70C the next, when the heating element in a kettle can't gain 35C in a second and that's getting 2kW of power through it...

 

 

Look at your starting water temperature in C-Link before you game/load and then the peak value. That delta represents the possible reduction in temperature from blasting your fans, although a 100% reduction isn't necessarily realistic. So if baseline water temp is 27C and load temp is 37C, you can only reduce your CPU temps by 10C with strong fan speeds. The water temperature is the baseline CPU temperature, for our purposes.

 

As mentioned, the problem isn't that the radiator isn't radiating the heat, it's that the transfer of heat from the CPU to the plate seems to be slower than I expected. Rather than speculating on the nature of physics, I was rather asking people with 4790K's and H110i GT's if their setup performs the same.

 

It could just be that the transfer of heat from the CPU die to the CPU spreader isn't particularly efficient. But I'm curious for evidence...

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I don't have my fans set to react to the CPU temperature, only the water temperature

 

This is how the cooler was designed to run. Many people get caught up thinking the fans need to react to the CPU temperatures and change (or want to change) the setting. It doesn't hurt, but it does make the fans run more than needed.

 

 

Quite, but I find it odd that a CPU under load can go from registering 35C one second to 70C the next, when the heating element in a kettle can't gain 35C in a second and that's getting 2kW of power through it...

 

This is what happens when you apply current the CPU -- no matter what kind of cooling you have. The voltage applied is near instantaneous. If there was no cold plate to help transfer some of the heat away, it would be frighteningly higher. No cooling system on the planet can keep up with the voltage fluctuations of a PC. Fortunately it doesn't have to. You're right, the water cannot jump 35C in that instant which is good for everyone. If your water temp was 70C we would have a problem, but remember the CPU is not in the water. The water and CPU temps are not on a 1:1 ratio. Your voltage settings will determine your CPU temperature. How much heat is is then transferred away is related to the physical properties of the CPU, it's lid, the TIM, and the cold plate of the cooling system (air or water). In a radiator system, the water then acts as a holding tank until the heat can be released through the radiator fins. The water can hold more heat than an air tower and has the further advantage of being able to dump that heat directly out of the case.

 

 

As mentioned, the problem isn't that the radiator isn't radiating the heat, it's that the transfer of heat from the CPU to the plate seems to be slower than I expected. Rather than speculating on the nature of physics, I was rather asking people with 4790K's and H110i GT's if their setup performs the same. It could just be that the transfer of heat from the CPU die to the CPU spreader isn't particularly efficient. But I'm curious for evidence...

 

Well, yes. If you look around at very high end custom loops, you will see a wide variety of cold plates -- some that are extremely expensive and cost more than an entire AIO unit. They usually advertise a 1-3C reduction in CPU temps. That's about where we are at with the materials. However, I think you know where the limitation is here. The 4790k is notorious for it's thermal properties. Even though it was an improvement on the 4690k, it is still the limiting factor, as is the die on my 5820k. My cooling system has more potential, but I can't use it because of the immediate current temperature increase on the CPU. This why de-lidding is popular with the 4790K, although I am not suggesting you should do this.

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My H110i GT is a couple of years old (I bought it as soon as it came out) and has been in 3 different builds.

 

Did you get one of the dodgy ones? I've had mine just under 13 months, and I got it on the release day (after the manufacturing defect was fixed)

 

That said, my unit has failed now!

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