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Need replacement fan for AX1200. Suggestions ?


THS

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Well, once you crack it open, it RMA will never be an option again. Aside from that, I suppose the logical replacement is the NF-A14 industrial (PWM) 2000 rpm model. It would provide similar airflow with a substantial reduction in max speed noise. It is a low current fan and has a low start-up speed, so hopefully this will minimize and issues with the transition. The Yate Loon DB14-BH12 appears to be a PWM fan, but you should confirm there are 4 wires coming out of what you have and that is the model inside the AX1200.

 

I have no idea what kind of fan connector you will find inside the unit. I don't normally take these apart for obvious reasons, no matter how much I want to replace the fan in my current unit.

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Well, once you crack it open, it RMA will never be an option again. Aside from that, I suppose the logical replacement is the NF-A14 industrial (PWM) 2000 rpm model. It would provide similar airflow with a substantial reduction in max speed noise. It is a low current fan and has a low start-up speed, so hopefully this will minimize and issues with the transition. The Yate Loon DB14-BH12 appears to be a PWM fan, but you should confirm there are 4 wires coming out of what you have and that is the model inside the AX1200.

 

I have no idea what kind of fan connector you will find inside the unit. I don't normally take these apart for obvious reasons, no matter how much I want to replace the fan in my current unit.

 

It's out of warranty anyway because it was a replacement and the original purchase was a HX1000 in 2008 and those only have 5 year warranties.

 

The Yate Loon D14BH-12 fan lists 2800 RPM.

 

http://www.yateloon.com/s/en/2/product/DC-FAN-SERIES-140x140x25-38839.html

 

Wouldn't I want the NF-A14 industrialPPC-3000 PWM instead of the 2000 version ?

 

https://www.amazon.ca/Noctua-NF-A14-industrialPPC-3000-140x140x25mm-3000rpm/dp/B00KESS5L4/ref=sr_1_14?s=pc&ie=UTF8&qid=1464900853&sr=1-14&keywords=noctua+NF-A14

 

https://www.amazon.ca/Noctua-NF-A14-industrialPPC-2000-140x140x25mm-2000rpm/dp/B00KESSUDW/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1464900896&sr=8-5&keywords=noctua+NF-A14

 

They are both the same price here.

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I considered that, however once you get into that range the extra airflow may have little effect on cooling and the 3000 is certainly a step up in noise. I wasn't sure why you were replacing the fan, but the most likely reason was ticking, sticking, or some other irritant. 159 cfm is quite a bit of air for a box that size. Either one will do the cooling job, but not knowing the fan curve for the AX1200 or when it applies voltage, makes it a little harder. The 2000's minimal fan speed might be an asset and the limit would curb unnecessary high speeds. Mostly, knowing how hard the 3000 rpm model pushes, I am having a hard time imagining it inside the PSU. I would probably start with the slower model to see whether it was enough, before committing to the faster if it were necessary. When you start with the 3000, you may always wonder if the lower speed model would be better and self-torture isn't fun. Either way, it's a bit of an unknown and you should probably go with your gut feeling.

 

However, if you are going through Amazon you can probably get either and it doesn't work out return and try the other at minimal expense.

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I considered that, however once you get into that range the extra airflow may have little effect on cooling and the 3000 is certainly a step up in noise. I wasn't sure why you were replacing the fan, but the most likely reason was ticking, sticking, or some other irritant. 159 cfm is quite a bit of air for a box that size. Either one will do the cooling job, but not knowing the fan curve for the AX1200 or when it applies voltage, makes it a little harder. The 2000's minimal fan speed might be an asset and the limit would curb unnecessary high speeds. Mostly, knowing how hard the 3000 rpm model pushes, I am having a hard time imagining it inside the PSU. I would probably start with the slower model to see whether it was enough, before committing to the faster if it were necessary. When you start with the 3000, you may always wonder if the lower speed model would be better and self-torture isn't fun. Either way, it's a bit of an unknown and you should probably go with your gut feeling.

 

However, if you are going through Amazon you can probably get either and it doesn't work out return and try the other at minimal expense.

 

I see your point. My PSU is actually overkill. I only have a single 6 core Xeon X5670 @ 4.2 and a GTX 970 Strix plus 2 ssds / 2 hdds. No plan to SLI or xfire in the future.

 

The crappy Yate Loon fan is making noises. Sounds almost as if it's a tiny bit of paper or something. Youtube shows people with similar fan sounds.

 

Corsair shouldn't have picked that crappy fan. Oh well, I'll be avoiding corsair psus in the future anyway.

 

I doubt it would spin the fan up a lot because of the low load on my PSU. The current fan doesn't spin very fast even under load.

 

Now I'll just have to figure out the connectors and if I need to solder the wires.

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OK so there are 2 versions of the fan.

 

IP52 rated:

 

https://www.amazon.ca/Noctua-NF-A14-industrialPPC-2000-140x140x25mm-2000rpm/dp/B00KESSUDW/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1464912816&sr=8-2&keywords=NF-A14+industrialPPC-2000+PWM

 

and IP67 rated.

 

https://www.amazon.ca/Noctua-NF-A14-industrialPPC-2000-140x140x25mm-2000rpm/dp/B00KESSIUW/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1464912816&sr=8-1&keywords=NF-A14+industrialPPC-2000+PWM

 

There is only a $2 difference. The specs are EXACTLY the same except the IP67 offers more dust / water resistance and only $2 more.

 

Ordered the IP67 one. I will update when I get it and install it.

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IP67... well now you can take it in the bathtub with you. I forgot about the connectors and potential need to solder. That would make returning difficult. I think 2000 is the right choice. I had a pair of the 3000 for a while and could never find a use for them. They scream industrial use --- literally. Also, if there is some sort of RPM matching problem with the PWM signal, the 2000 model can be salvaged an used in several different situations. I have mine on the radiator now for the summer season. The 3000 would likely be a desk ornament.
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I came across this:

 

http://www.overclock.net/t/1371958/yate-loon-d14bh-12-fan-from-ax1200

 

Looks like the ****ty yate loon uses a non standard connector.

 

I don't have any adapters or fan connectors or spare fans lying around. Should I order some kind of adapter perhaps ?

 

Ideally I don't want to cut the Noctua fan's wire. I'd much rather use some kind of adapter.

 

I'm thinking, cut the wire off the yate loon fan. Then solder that to some kind of adapter which would connect with the noctua fan. Just no idea what kind of adapter I'd need....

 

EDIT: One of the comment says: "The original Yate Loon was limited to 1700 rpm, in the AX1200 at full load, yes it could go all out to 2800 rpm but try to imagine your PSU with a fan going at that speed. The noise will be deafening, try not to forget that the Yate Loon was already a noisy beast at low rpm."

 

Shiit. I could save money by going for the 1500 RPM non-industrial fan. Should I do that ? Someone in that thread actually used the 1200 RPM fan and it seems to have worked.

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Sacrificing a male to male 4 pin connector for the cut job would be the better way to do it and save the new fan from harm. Looking at the pictures in that thread, I can't tell which parts are from the AX1200 and which were added. I don't think I like the idea of using a LNA to cut the speed. It's an extra variable you don't need in this problem and you should not use one with Industrial Line. If you want to go even further in reducing fan noise, the brown & latte A14 will be slightly less noisy than an A14i at the same speed. If you put your ear against it, the A14i has a faint higher end frequency typical of... an industrial fan. It will be more effective than standard A14 at the same RPM and it can run as low 400-450 RPM. If you have decided you want to go ultra quiet and give up some airflow, the A14 PWM may be OK.

 

What I still haven't found is the operating stages of the fan. It sounds like we have as 1700 max. I am a little more curious about the stepping. My guess is there are only two operating speeds for the fan. A low speed and a high. It looks like we know the high.

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Hmm. I do know this for sure. My AX1200 PSU fan never speeds up (or at least I don't hear it).

 

This is likely because my system draws only 350W at full load when gaming and I have no plan for SLI or xfire.

 

Should I cancel the A14i order and buy the A14 PWM 1500 PWM instead ?

 

Silence is what I am going for ideally.

 

Total cost for me including tax:

 

NF-A14 PWM: $30.45

NF-A14 industrialPPC-2000 PWM: $39.49

NF-A14 industrialPPC-2000 IP67 PWM: $41.75

 

Can't decide...

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Both fans are sufficient to cool the PSU at 1500 rpm. The max speed on my PSU fan is also 1500 rpm, and when it does that I want to hit it with a hammer. The A14i will be able to run the specified 1700 max if needed. The A14 will fall 200 rpm short. This is not a meaningful difference in terms of cooling. If the 1200AX has a run all the time fan program, the standard A14 will be inaudible at the lowest level. You can hear the A14i at 800 rpm at 3ft in a quiet room, if you are trying. Brown is still ugly, but no one will ever see it. The A14 is known to work. I expect the A14i to work for the reasons stated earlier, but it is not a given.
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I don't want industrial noise lol so I cancelled the A14i and ordered the A14 PWM.

 

I also ordered the NF-S12A FLX to replace the top 120mm exhaust fan in my case.

 

Came out to about $56 total for both. Should make a noticible difference hopefully.

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I don't want industrial noise lol so I cancelled the A14i and ordered the A14 PWM.

 

I also ordered the NF-S12A FLX to replace the top 120mm exhaust fan in my case.

 

Came out to about $56 total for both. Should make a noticible difference hopefully.

 

the noctua industrial fans sound like vacuum cleaners. the vardar 140mm F3 moves a ton of air, doesn't make annoying noises when slowed down like cheap fans do, and moves a ton of air in any application. i would have gone with that

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@c-attack

 

Just an update. I got the NF-A14 PWM and tried it.

 

The fan won't even spin.... Sometimes it spins just a little but then it will stop after a bit. It is so slow, there is essentially no airflow. This is of course, assuming it even spins at all.

 

I double checked the extension cable I soldered to the cable I cut off from the Yate Loon. If I plug a 3 pin connector to the extension, it works fine however this 4pin pwm fan just doesn't work....

 

The extension wire I made is detailed here: http://www.overclock.net/t/1371958/yate-loon-d14bh-12-fan-from-ax1200/20

 

I'm returning this PWM fan and getting the FLX version. That forum shows someone using the FLX version and it worked fine.

 

I should have just ordered the regular non-PWM version to begin with. What a hassle.

 

Right now my PC looks like frankestin. The PSU is just sitting there outside with a regular case fan on top of it blowing air into it lol

 

PS: If it turns out that the FLX one doesn't work either, that probably means the fan controller in my PSU is fubared ?

 

If that's the case, I'll just drill a hole into the side of the PSU casing and connect the darn fan into my motherboard and be done with it.

 

On a plus side in that case, that way I would be able to control the fan RPM with my mobo ! Can even have it set to throttle with CPU load etc.

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I am sorry it didn't work. If it is a 3 pin DC motor, what is the 4th wire? The beginning of the thread suggested it was a PWM wire and I agreed. Unfortunately, this is the problem with this stuff. There are no specific wiring diagrams and even the YL page doesn't really give a full specification run down. Since the original poster appears to have gotten this to work with the FLX, there is reason to be optimistic. Although, I wonder if this is why he decided to use the Low Noise Apapter --- he was supplying 12v all the time.
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