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AMD Graphics Card gets to hot


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Case Corsair Graphite 600T

 

Cooling. Corsair H100i water cooling

 

Processor: AMD FX 9590

 

Graphics card. AMD R9 280X

 

The fans for the cooling system will not fit in the case but sits on top of the case, both as exhaust thus not through the cooling package that sits on the ceiling inside the case. I have no problem with the cooling of the processor. My concern is that the temperature of the graphics card quickly rises to between 65-70 degrees when I play such as The Division or Black Ops 3. I have bought 4 extra fans mounted on the side panel of the chassi of the PC case. Now I've mounted the fans so that two as intakes and two as exhaust vertically. Unfortunately, there is no major difference from before I installed the 4 extra fans which makes me suspect that I mounted them wrong. Does anyone know how I should mount them for the best cooling? All 4 as intakes or all 4 as exhaust? I have a program to the graphics card's called GPU Tweak. The default setting are always that one of the fans on the graphics card spins at 50% and the other only 10%. Is that really correct?

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If I'm reading this correctly, you have 4 fans mounted on the one side panel, 2 as intake and 2 as exhaust? I would have thought that 2 fans as intake on the front and the H100i on the top as an exhaust would be enough. To be honest 65-70 degrees on an R9 seems OK, that's about the temp that my R9 390 gets to when gaming. If you want to put a couple of fans on the left panel, pointing at the gpu, that should help a bit, but the more fans you have the noisier it gets.
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Thanks for your answer. I've got 8 fans all together the original two fans in the case. Two on top of the case and 4 on a mesh. It's the 4 on the mesh on the side panel I wonder how to mount? 65-70 degrees this early before the summer makes me wonder how hot the GPU will turn later on?
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That depends how hard your gpu cooling is working now. If you want the 4 fans on the mesh I would have all 4 as intake, blowing onto the gpu, otherwise (as you have them now) they will be fighting against each other. If you are worried about summer temps, you obviously don't live in the UK.
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It is possible to poison your case environment by failing to remove waste heat, but usually you can't do a whole lot for GPU VRM temperatures except by increasing the speed of it's own fans. The circuit board is well shrouded and it needs direct cooling to be effective. Even if you get extreme with blaster 120x38mm fans (or what you have done) you likely can only take 1-4C off the load GPU temps. Now if the other hardware in the case is suffering because of the GPU, then that would merit some more fan work. First, I would get some software control over your GPU fans and try a small bump up. Unfortunately, I am off the AMD train so I can't specifically recommend a fan speed for that model.
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Only software I've got to control the fans on the graphics card is the already mentioned GPU Tweak but as I wrote earlier the default speed set are always at 50 % on one of the fans and only 10 % one the other. If I change it to 50 % on both fans and try to save the changes the program changes it back to 10 % again. If I after a couple of tries manage to get both fans to stick at 50 % the next time I start the computer the default speed is changes back to 10 and 50 %. To control the other 8 fans I use Link. I will try snapper69:s suggestion and mount all 4 fans on the mesh as intakes. If that dosent't help I will try to find some better software to better control the fans on the graphics card. Thank's to both of you for your time and advice, I appreciate it.
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I would suggest you take care of the GPU control issues first so you can make a reasonable decision on whether the additional fans are needed. GPU Tweak can be a frustrating program. I used GPU Tweak I for one specific program that did not get along with EVGA Precision X, but it was limited. GPU Tweak II was a total mess and behaved in random ways as you described, right up until the moment I deleted it. I suggest you try MSI Afterburner. It is pretty much the go to program these days now that EVGA has stopped trying. These things don't need to be GPU or board brand specific, but if you prefer your native AMD Overdrive, it should be set a fan profile as well. Here is a list of others. There is a % speed where the fans will be too annoying. Stay below it. If your card has any of that "zero fan", no spin until it gets really hot stuff, that is another reason to take manual control. Small fan speeds at low loads can make a big difference and prevent the heat build up in the GPU casing.

 

Case fans are for case heat management. They will help move the waste heat that has already passed through the GPU casing, but they won't do anything for the GPU VRM temperature on the circuit board, which is what we usually refer to as GPU temp. If you want to reduce your GPU temp by 5C with case fans, the only way to do it is to reduce your entire case ambient temperature by 5C. That's a tall order and is like trying to cool down your PC by making the ceiling fan run faster.

 

You certainly should come to some arrangement for the side case fans. Using them as intakes will help dislodge heat hanging around the outside of the GPU which is then exhausted out the back. This set-up benefits most people. If you have monster hot cards, sometimes is is better to run the side panels as exhaust to get the GPU waste heat out as fast as possible. This is preferential in scenarios where the GPU heat is having a detrimental effect on the rest of the hardware (top mounted radiator, memory, etc.) I suspect you are in the first category, but either way you don't need to stack fans on the side door. Air flow is not additive between fans. Two 60 cfm fans in-line still can only move 60 cfm. I am not even sure how these fans are arranged since there isn't a native side door spot on the 600T. Did you custom cut the door? Did you mount them inside the case right above the GPU?

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Thanks. I downloaded and installed MSI Afterburner and started The Division for a few minutes. I can't test I properly because I just had surgery in my eye and are not supposed to sit at a computer. I've got one question about Afterburner. There is only one fan control in the program but two fans on the card. Does the fan controller in the program change the speed of the two fans simultaneously? My case is an special edition which came with both a window and a metal mesh for extra fans.
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Both fans on the same GPU (ACX style casing) will always run at the same speed. This is desirable to prevent hot spots on the circuit board. Two different discrete GPUs can have different fan settings.

 

Settings --> Fan --> Enable user defined software auto fan control.... make your curve.

 

Back on the main page, if the fan speed % bar is lit green, you are on your custom fan control. Click user define again to instantly put it back in the factory state. You can toggle this back and forth as you like.

 

I suspect someone has taken the time to write a better guide than me. It is a very popular program and there should be a lot help available. All these programs take a little getting used to. I used EVGA Precision for years. It took a little bit of time until I liked Afterburner more -- mostly because it was reliable.

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