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H60 in push pull or is better to buy an H75?


Contiusa

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Guys I am considering one of these two water coolers for testing (against other coolers). Ideally speaking, I would buy the H75 and take one of the fans to simulate the H60 (that I was also going to test in push pull, since I have a SP120 High Performance fan in my case). But this is when the specs come into play.

 

I imagine that the 2mm difference in radiator thickness will not influence. The fans seem to be the same, although Corsair website states the H75 one with higher static pressure.

 

The H75 has an Asetec pump and the H60 has a CoolIT pump, right? Are they too different to the point of being two different systems or the H75 can indeed simulate the H60 by approximation?

 

Do both pumps have radically different rpms or efficiency? Where can I check the rpm of both pumps?

 

I would love to know some input, because I would rather buy the H75. Here in Brazil I can find one at the same price of the H60 and it has an extra fan, ceramic stuff, etc. I would resell it after the testing as well, and the H75 has better value. Then the comparison in between the two interests me.

 

Regards,

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H75 - Asetek, Pump 1500 rpm, dual fan, related to H105

 

H60 - CoolIT, Pump 2000-2200 rpm, single fan, related to former H80i/100i. There is a whole bunch of pump information out there that may not be accurate. People often report the pump speed at 4000+, but I suspect this is how the BIOS interprets the speed without Corsair's pump divider of 2. 4000+ is pretty fast for an cooler on the lower tier with a short system length.

 

This is a link to a site that reviewed both coolers in their natural state. I would attribute the 3C difference solely to the additional fan, but that is something you can find out. I would also ignore any published specification differences between the fans. The grey SP120L fan has multiple variations, usually with RPM limit differences for different coolers. It also had had one or two number changes, the kind where the fan didn't change, but the specs did. Usually this means the way the fan is tested changed. An SP120L from any cooler and your SP120 PE should all move the same amount of air at like RPMs. Same thing goes for static pressure.

 

I am not really sure what your aim is here. Are you trying to see which unit would be a better fit for you with one fan? Or is this testing fun? Having owned several H80i from that generation, my preference would be for the H75. In fairness, without the pump block driving the fans, the weakness of the prior model is removed. However, you don't see a lot of complaints about the H75 or cousin H105 with the same pump. In fairness, there are less H75/H105 out there in the world, but if you are already leaning to the H75, I think it bears some weight.

 

Also: There was a prior version of the H60 with a slightly larger matte plastic, square cap and ribbed tubes. It has been a few years, so those should be out of circulation, but don't let someone pass that model on to you. It had some pump noise issues and the replacement model is certainly more attractive.

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H75 - Asetek, Pump 1500 rpm, dual fan, related to H105

 

H60 - CoolIT, Pump 2000-2200 rpm, single fan, related to former H80i/100i. There is a whole bunch of pump information out there that may not be accurate. People often report the pump speed at 4000+, but I suspect this is how the BIOS interprets the speed without Corsair's pump divider of 2. 4000+ is pretty fast for an cooler on the lower tier with a short system length.

 

This is a link to a site that reviewed both coolers in their natural state. I would attribute the 3C difference solely to the additional fan, but that is something you can find out. I would also ignore any published specification differences between the fans. The grey SP120L fan has multiple variations, usually with RPM limit differences for different coolers. It also had had one or two number changes, the kind where the fan didn't change, but the specs did. Usually this means the way the fan is tested changed. An SP120L from any cooler and your SP120 PE should all move the same amount of air at like RPMs. Same thing goes for static pressure.

 

I am not really sure what your aim is here. Are you trying to see which unit would be a better fit for you with one fan? Or is this testing fun? Having owned several H80i from that generation, my preference would be for the H75. In fairness, without the pump block driving the fans, the weakness of the prior model is removed. However, you don't see a lot of complaints about the H75 or cousin H105 with the same pump. In fairness, there are less H75/H105 out there in the world, but if you are already leaning to the H75, I think it bears some weight.

 

Also: There was a prior version of the H60 with a slightly larger matte plastic, square cap and ribbed tubes. It has been a few years, so those should be out of circulation, but don't let someone pass that model on to you. It had some pump noise issues and the replacement model is certainly more attractive.

 

Nice info, thanks a lot! And I think that too, that 4000+ is perhaps due to BIOS misreading.

 

The aim is to test the H60 or the H75 in single and push pull against the Seidon 120v and one or two air coolers like the Hyper 212X. These cooling solutions are very popular in Brazil and I am curious about the pros and cons of both water coolers and air coolers. I am gonna do it for fan sake and sell them afterwards. I am also curious about pump / fun noise in the water coolers, because they tend to have higher rpm fans (and my Corsair SP120 HP is already a bit on the noise side, even with my fan controller set to 50%). But I reckon that Cooler Master CPU coolers also have high rpm fans. Would be nice to see the result with a heatsink and a radiator. But I already bought a Raijintek Themis Evo and it runs at 1600 tops. I currently have an air cooler (Noctua NH-U14S) and I might buy a water cooler down the road to play around with it and make a good OC. Then I am curious to test a water cooler to see how it fares in terms of noise.

 

And good to know about the old / ribbed H60. I'll keep and eye on it.

 

H75 - Asetek, Pump 1500 rpm (...) H60 - CoolIT, Pump 2000-2200 rpm

 

Wouldn't that make the H75 less efficient with one fan than the H60? Or perhaps the mechanics and parts of the Asetek pump do not require faster speeds?

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Generally, pump speed is not a critical performance factor in AIO coolers. The distance from contact plate to radiator and back is quite short. Removing the heat from the water (fan speed/radiator surface area) is more likely to be the limiting factor, rather than the ability to deliver the water to the heat release point. The cycle rate is counterbalanced by the volume of water. The more water you have in the system, the more heat it can hold at a given moment without a further increase in water temperature. For this reason, pump speed/flow rate may be slightly more important in smaller coolers like the H60 or H75, compared to larger coolers like the H110/115 series. With everything else being equal, the higher flow rate cooler offers an advantage, in theory. However, the actual realization in terms of temperature is going to quite small. You would need to run a sustained load for a lengthy amount of time before the any difference becomes apparent and I think we are talking about 1-2C at the most over a few hours. It's hard to keep stable test conditions for that long to validate it.

 

One of the things I find very helpful, but I rarely see in reviews, is a comparison under load with sub-maximal fan speeds. Most people do their testing with the fans at 100%. I don't know any one that likes static pressure blade fans churning at 2000 rpm+. If you have the ability to test it, a second set of benchmarks with fan speeds fixed at something like 1000 or 1500 rpm (whatever) offers an interesting comparison point. This further reduces the role the fan plays in system performance and puts more emphasis on the other aspects of the cooler, like fin design and flow rate. It would interesting to see if the rankings from the max speed test match. It also offers some practical data for most people who are more likely to spend 99% of their time at those speeds. You can always change fans or make them run faster. Most people have more fan speed than they are willing to use.

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Generally, pump speed is not a critical performance factor in AIO coolers. The distance from contact plate to radiator and back is quite short. Removing the heat from the water (fan speed/radiator surface area) is more likely to be the limiting factor, rather than the ability to deliver the water to the heat release point. The cycle rate is counterbalanced by the volume of water. The more water you have in the system, the more heat it can hold at a given moment without a further increase in water temperature. For this reason, pump speed/flow rate may be slightly more important in smaller coolers like the H60 or H75, compared to larger coolers like the H110/115 series. With everything else being equal, the higher flow rate cooler offers an advantage, in theory. However, the actual realization in terms of temperature is going to quite small. You would need to run a sustained load for a lengthy amount of time before the any difference becomes apparent and I think we are talking about 1-2C at the most over a few hours. It's hard to keep stable test conditions for that long to validate it.

 

One of the things I find very helpful, but I rarely see in reviews, is a comparison under load with sub-maximal fan speeds. Most people do their testing with the fans at 100%. I don't know any one that likes static pressure blade fans churning at 2000 rpm+. If you have the ability to test it, a second set of benchmarks with fan speeds fixed at something like 1000 or 1500 rpm (whatever) offers an interesting comparison point. This further reduces the role the fan plays in system performance and puts more emphasis on the other aspects of the cooler, like fin design and flow rate. It would interesting to see if the rankings from the max speed test match. It also offers some practical data for most people who are more likely to spend 99% of their time at those speeds. You can always change fans or make them run faster. Most people have more fan speed than they are willing to use.

 

Cool, yeah, I'll think about it. Still on the fence here... For the sake of testing I might buy the H60 and use the SP120 that I already have to test in push pull. The H75 is less popular and people in my forum might question the results in case I use an H75 with a single fan to simulate by approximation the H60.

 

And yes, I intend to test both in full speed and PWM (or some slower curve). I also think it is pointless to test just in full speed. I see no significant change in temperature using my Noctua in PWM or full tilt. I am not sure, but I think it was something like 1-2ºC. Not even relevant and it is not worth the noise. I need to see how the H60 (H75) installs, but I assume I have to plug the fan (s) in the CPU-fan header with a splitter -- since they don't have Corsair Link or any app, right? And the pump in any 12v header to run at full speed?

 

Most fans/pumps use two pulses per revolution and I suspect the 4000+ is down to there being four pulses per revolution. You may find https://www.maximintegrated.com/en/app-notes/index.mvp/id/1784 interesting.

 

Thanks! I'll take a look.

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I need to see how the H60 (H75) installs, but I assume I have to plug the fan (s) in the CPU-fan header with a splitter -- since they don't have Corsair Link or any app, right? And the pump in any 12v header to run at full speed?

 

Yes, both should be 3 pin or DC 12v on the pump. Then fans separately from the board, fan controller, etc.

 

I think it's fine to use the SP120 Performance Edition in the tests, as long as you tell people what you've done. In fact, you might consider getting another SP120 PE and use those as the standard testing pair. The fans are very similar in design to the stock models on both coolers, but a lot of people are going to make the switch to the retail "ring" editions. Now that I think about it, a nice second RPM testing point might be in 1350 range. That is approximately the maximum radiator restricted speed of a SP120 Quiet Edition and the effective difference between the two fans is a common question.

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Yes, both should be 3 pin or DC 12v on the pump. Then fans separately from the board, fan controller, etc.

 

I think it's fine to use the SP120 Performance Edition in the tests, as long as you tell people what you've done. In fact, you might consider getting another SP120 PE and use those as the standard testing pair. The fans are very similar in design to the stock models on both coolers, but a lot of people are going to make the switch to the retail "ring" editions. Now that I think about it, a nice second RPM testing point might be in 1350 range. That is approximately the maximum radiator restricted speed of a SP120 Quiet Edition and the effective difference between the two fans is a common question.

 

Good points. The SP120 PE is hard to come by around here though. I think I got the last one on-line (:sigh!:). Maybe the stocks were restored. I'll see what can I get.

 

Thanks for the help,

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OK, then I wouldn't worry about getting another and you should choose whatever fan speeds you like since the Quiet Edition is likely to uncommon as well.

 

Cool. In fact I ordered two XtraFlo 120 in the bundle (to later test with the Seidon), and they are also 2000rpm fans. I could use them. Or pair one of them with the H60 stock, because I just remembered that the SP120 that I have is a 3 pin fan. Otherwise I would have to calculate the knob voltages of my fan controller to try and approximate the speeds for a PWM test.

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I ended up buying the H60. It was my base test water cooler since the beginning, and then it is better to use it other than simulating it. If I end up liking to do these tests I can buy other models down the line.

 

Later on I might post a photo of all the coolers that are going to be tested.

 

Cheers,

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