Jump to content
Corsair Community

H100i + Noctua NF-F12 - Questions!


Laucien

Recommended Posts

Hi!, last week I bought an Obsidian 750D case to replace my old one and since I now have a lot more room I was hoping to get some extra fans and finally put my H100i in push+pull config.

 

My idea is to replace the 2 stock fans with 4 NF-F12 since apparently those are among the best to get for this scenario (and are actually available here in Argentina) and I have a couple questions.

  1. Do I need to get any extra screws to fix them to the radiator? The H100i came with 8 really long screws that I'm currently using to fix the 2 fans to the top of the case and the radiator to those fans at the same time. I'm assuming I can use those 8 screws to replace the 2 stock fans then use regular screws for the bottom 2 fans and just fix them to the radiator.
  2. I have the stock fans that come with the case. The 2 front ones pulling air in and the back one pushing it out... what would be the best way to set the push-pull config in the H100i? Pushing air from the case through the radiator and out or pushing it from the outside to the inside of the case? Kinda think that the later could be a dust nightmare.

Think that's it for now... thanks for reading and appreciate any insight you guys might have :D.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1) You likely do need to get extra screws. The thread size is 6-32 and you probably need 30mm in length to attach the fans to the bottom of the radiator. I am not sure which metric is used there for screw size, but hopefully you can convert that if needed. You can't run screws all the way through the radiator, so no matter what you need one set to attach it to the case and one to secure the fans below.

 

2) You want to the radiator fans to exhaust air out of the case. No need to dump CPU waste heat into the case. It puts all of the exhaust duties on single rear fan and in the meantime the hot air will bump up all your internal component temperatures by 5-10-15C, depending upon load. 2 front intake and dual top and single rear exhaust should be fairly close to the ideal balanced in/out volume ratio. Even with 4 fans, the radiator reduces the volume of air moved and you won't get 121 m3/h when at full blast. Since most people prefer to run the radiator fans at the lowest level they can, you can easily balance by adjusting the front intake and rear speeds as needed.

 

Dust should be irrelevant either way. If your environment is dusty, it will get in the case regardless of fan orientation. If you are relatively clean, you go quite a while without needing a dust up.

 

3. Make sure you get the PWM version of the F12, if you want to run them from the block and use Corsair Link. Of course, the 3 or 4 pin version can be run from the board or other controller, without Link.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1) You likely do need to get extra screws. The thread size is 6-32 and you probably need 30mm in length to attach the fans to the bottom of the radiator. I am not sure which metric is used there for screw size, but hopefully you can convert that if needed. You can't run screws all the way through the radiator, so no matter what you need one set to attach it to the case and one to secure the fans below.

 

That's what I figuered yeah. Right now I have the fans secured to the top of the case (inside) and that holding the radiator up in place pulling air from the case through the radiator and out of the case. Not the most optimum solution I know.

For this I'm using the 8 long (I'm assuming 30mm) screws that come with the H100i. I'm assuming it is strong enough to hold the radiator+fans but I'm gonna make very sure just to avoid it falling on top of everything haha.

 

2) You want to the radiator fans to exhaust air out of the case. No need to dump CPU waste heat into the case. It puts all of the exhaust duties on single rear fan and in the meantime the hot air will bump up all your internal component temperatures by 5-10-15C, depending upon load. 2 front intake and dual top and single rear exhaust should be fairly close to the ideal balanced in/out volume ratio. Even with 4 fans, the radiator reduces the volume of air moved and you won't get 121 m3/h when at full blast. Since most people prefer to run the radiator fans at the lowest level they can, you can easily balance by adjusting the front intake and rear speeds as needed.

 

Awesome thanks.

 

One question on pushing air through the radiator. I noticed that some of the fins are bent. Googled around a bit and apparenlty is no big deal, should I try to straighten them out carefully or just leave it like that?.

 

Dust should be irrelevant either way. If your environment is dusty, it will get in the case regardless of fan orientation. If you are relatively clean, you go quite a while without needing a dust up.

 

Yeah, the case is in a slightly dustier than average area but I'm already used to cleaning it up every couple of months. Just figured that the more intake fans I have the quicker it will get more dust inside.

 

3. Make sure you get the PWM version of the F12, if you want to run them from the block and use Corsair Link. Of course, the 3 or 4 pin version can be run from the board or other controller, without Link.

 

Yup, the ones I'm looking at are PWM.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wouldn't bother trying to straighten out the fins unless the piece is turned enough that it would block the flow of air. The difference is absolutely minuscule and there is always a small chance you could break the piece off. More often this kind of thing happens in the corners when you mis-thread a screw or something similar. However, I wouldn't worry about those since little air passes though the extreme corner area.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

In retrospect, 30mm might be slightly too long for attaching the bottom fans. The fan is obviously 25mm, but the rubber corners have a somewhat open triangle around the screw opening. If you have a normal small head screw, it will go right down the fan. This is a not a problem, but does then mean you have a full 5mm sticking through to the rad. I have a pile of specialty screws with big, flat heads that sit up on the rubber itself, effectively reducing the overall length by another 2mm. You don't need much screw to hold those fans in plane. 2mm is fine. If you get stuck in between screw sizes, you can use small rubber washers to keep the longer ones from going all the way through to the fins.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey there!

 

Upon reading this info wanted to chime in on my experience- actual experience.

 

I had to RMA my h100 [original] yes you didnt read it wrong- original h100. It did not die but the coolant started to loose its properties at 4.7 years.

 

I have a HAFX case- and I had set my h100 in push/pull config. Yes it was a sandwich but it fit. Also i have the top fans- so all in all i had 6 fans dedicated to the top.

 

In this way it was able to cool my 2600k at 4.6 Ghz daily for 4.7 years idle at around 30C and load at around 60C. The pump was at constat 2.2k but yeah- one day i hit thermal overheat and thats that.

 

Push/pull go always!!! If you have the room for it. Im not talking if you dont have space for it- but if your case is big enough- always go push/pull. The fans loose quite a lot of % of static and airflow when pushing/pulling the radiator.

 

The stats you read in the website are maxium stats at 100% fan. When you do either push or pull at normal noise you get maybe <70%(aprox, dont quote on that). When you add those 2 extra fans- you have the ability to reduce the power with sustained performance. If you have 2 fans you want performance you have to crank fans up. with 4 fans you can achieve this with reduced noise.

 

In my HAFX case i was utilizing my fans about 50% of the power but my case has 14 fans and positive air pressure- so it was all quiet and nice and I had to dust the case in 2 months only.

 

Also keep in mind- when dust collects the % is degraded both on static and airflow. Dust gets always in- even in clean room- its just the volume when.

 

In short: Positive air pressure- max fans and always go for push/pull if you have the room for it. Its a no brainer in the long run.

 

Ps. If you want to achieve best performance/noise ratio dont hesitate to spend good 50 euro/dollars for a good fan controller. I have no experience on Corsair link but i do have a Japanese digital one and with 4 digits from 0 you can do amazing stuff with any fans or fan setup.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have been using AIO water cooling, on and off, for the past 12 years, with different motherboards and processors ( mostly overclocked ) and I have come to the conclusion that unless you NEED the extra 2 to 4 degrees cooling offered by push/pull, you may as well stick to a push or pull setup and enjoy the peace and quiet. My last 3 cpu's have been a 2500K a 3570k and now a 6600K, all overclocked and all water cooled with either a push or pull system. None of them have reached an unacceptable temperature. I use the biggest AIO that I can (either a 240mm or currently a 280mm) fitted with good, quiet fans and I get good cooling with the least possible noise. I currently control all my fans with the Asus fan control software and the case fans don't run at all when the temp is below 40 degrees.

 

That's my experience - actual experience.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree with Snapper. There are too many popular myths in the above and I don't want to spend my Friday doing PV=nRT calculations to illustrate the concepts. Most people do not need push/pull on AIO water coolers and very rarely on 27mm thick radiators. 4 x 120mm fans are usually louder than 2x120, even at a reduced speed and the temperature reductions at maximum are slight and should only matter to someone who is operating right at the edge of their safe temperature zone. However, in this specific instance there may be a different advantage for using push-pull and it is because of the NF-F12i 2000. That particular fan has a high pitch hum at speeds from approximately 1500-1600 up to the radiator restricted maximum ~1925. This is normal for any fan to pick up a lot of noise in the last 10% of it's RPM. With push-pull, you should not ever need to run the fans above 1500 to get maximum cooling. While 4xNF-F12i at 1500 probably has a higher sound pressure level than 2@1900 rpm, the quality of the sound will be better and likely less irritating. When I ran this combination on either side of an H80i, my case was a 45 lbs. monster bank vault like container. Not a lot of sound issues, but this one lead me to change fans often. I am certainly far more critical of sound profiles than any normal user, but in a more open, conventional case, the higher frequency noise is going to be noticeable at the end of rpm band.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You learn something new every day. I've got 3 NF-F12PWM fans stuck to the front of my 900D and the only way that I can tell they are running is by looking, unlike the stock fans on my H110i GT whih are loud whenever the temp goes up slightly. I've got 2 NF-140 PWM fans to replace them and I'll have a play with the coole fan settings in Asus fan control.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...