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Aim acceleration


thingmejig

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So I just bought a Corsair Scimitar mouse. I've disabled pointer precision and all options pertaining to mouse acceleration in Windows. I've tested multiple games (all with raw input and mouse acceleration disabled).

 

I keep reading marketing PR about this mouse to the effect of "optical mouse/zero-acceleration". Now the mouse definitely has acceleration! It's not even subtle. When I drag the mouse over the same fixed distance both slow and fast the crosshair ends up at completely different points on the screen.

 

I can't see an option for aim acceleration in the Corsair Utility Engine (other than Enhance Pointer Precision which is just synced to windows mouse settings and is off anyway). This has made me suspicious, but I just can't believe a mouse this expensive has forced acceleration (deliberate or not) with no ability to configure or turn it off. It renders playing FPS games like CSGO and Quake Live utterly, utterly useless. Like 95% of professional players play with aim acceleration completely disabled.

 

So am I missing something in options or is there just forced mouse acceleration with this product? I literally feel sick to my stomach with the thought of having wasted so much money on the product right now if there's no way to turn this off.

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So I restarted my computer and unplugged the mouse then plugged it back in again and that seems to have fixed the acceleration problem.

 

However, there's now an even stranger issue. When I set my DPI to 590-599 DPI in the Corsair Utility Engine there's barely any noticeable increase (as there should be). But when I go from 599 DPI to 600 there's quite a big increase. Then from say, 601-609 there's the same small increase like you'd expect again....

 

Could someone with this same mouse (Corsair Scimitar) test this? Basically drag your mouse across a fixed space on your desk/table whilst looking at a pole or something in-game then see how far your view rotates in-game. Then test it going from 599 DPI to 600 DPI and see how much of a change there is. Given it's only a 1 DPI difference it shouldn't even be perceptible, but when I do it my view in-game rotates by an extra 70 degrees easily.

 

It's not a huge issue for me, but it does mean I have to change all my in-game settings for every game I play and move to a new default DPI that's well outside 600 just incase I have to make minor adjustments from within the Corsair Utility Engine instead of the game settings if it doesn't support such small changes.

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The reason this happens btw, is because the mouse/software doesn't even detect any changes outside of 100 DPI increments. In other words, 705 DPI in your Corsair Utility Engine is just the same as 795. That's why when you suddenly get to 800 there's a massive and noticeable change in turn speed.

 

Why even bother letting people choose DPI numbers that don't even do anything?! Very misleading.

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However, there's now an even stranger issue. When I set my DPI to 590-599 DPI in the Corsair Utility Engine there's barely any noticeable increase (as there should be). But when I go from 599 DPI to 600 there's quite a big increase. Then from say, 601-609 there's the same small increase like you'd expect again....

 

Depending on the hardware, the sensor itself might not be able to use arbitrarily small DPI settings. Most sensors have native hardware-based DPI increments and native maximum sensor resolutions.

 

I'd guess that the sensor operates on 100 DPI increments.

 

On a side note, it is possible for software to interpolate the readings from the sensor to simulate arbitrary DPI settings in-between the sensor's native increments, but doing that tends to cause more problems than it solves. (Like software induced acceleration and jitter)

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The reason this happens btw, is because the mouse/software doesn't even detect any changes outside of 100 DPI increments. In other words, 705 DPI in your Corsair Utility Engine is just the same as 795. That's why when you suddenly get to 800 there's a massive and noticeable change in turn speed.

 

Why even bother letting people choose DPI numbers that don't even do anything?! Very misleading.

 

 

not sure how you even noticed a 50 dip difference or the lack of one. Do you have any proof that its only registering increments of 100 dip?

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Use the same testing methodology I outlined before. Set the sensitivity really low, in both the mouse and in-game (so it's even more obvious).

 

1. Look at an object in-game. Something distinctive like a pole or telephone, etc.

 

2. Drag mouse across a fixed distance. I use my mouse mat. From 1 corner to the next.

 

3. Do a few times until you're comfortable doing this consistently and then note where your crosshair lands. Ideally you want to end up at the same fixed point you started at.

 

In short - if u can do a perfect 360 in-game at whatever settings; then proceed to change the mouse by either 50 or 99 DPI (depending on where it is to start with) and note how literally nothing happens unless you go over 100 DPI steps (500,600,700 etc).

 

Apparently this is actually really common with mice these days. The other poster is correct in stating that mouse interpolation basically sucks, which is what you'll be using if it's not raw input. My last mouse could handle such small native DPI increases, so I just took it for granted most expensive 'gamer' mice would be able to also. Google "mouse muscle memory" if you don't know what it is already to understand why using consistent mouse settings across every game is important.

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