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Unofficial Hydro Series Installation Guide


StealthGaming
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Unofficial Hydro Series Installation Guide

 

This SGC guide will help with the proper installation of Corsair Hydro Series pumps. I noticed a number of forum members are having problems with the pump installation and higher than normal CPU temperatures, this may be related to Corsair instructions being basic and or vague when it comes to a successfully mounted Hydro Series Pump.

 

Step 1, upon opening your new Hydro Series Pump, take a few minutes to lay out all included parts on a flat surface and verify needed Mounting components were included in the box. Simply open the Corsair quick start guide to page no. 1 (included hardware) and compare the pictures with your hardware.

 

 

Step 2, this part of the guide will pertain to Intel LGA 115x and 1366 mounting when installing a H60, H80, H100 and the newly launched H110 GT Series Pumps. If you're using Intel: LGA 2011, 2011-v3 or AMD: AM2, AM3, FM1, FM2 you can skip this step since you'll be using the backplate that came with your MainBoard. Additionally those who are installing a Asetek made Hydro H50, H55, H75, H90, H105, H110 or the newly launched H80 GT and H100 GTX pumps can also skip this step since your backplate is of a different design.

 

 

Intel: LGA 115x, 1366 backplate

 

http://i1375.photobucket.com/albums/ag445/BlackOpsBoxes/Corsair%20Guide/Hydro.1_zpsgxiwfoky.jpg

 

 

A closer inspection reveals two notches made into one side of the backplate (the direction of the notches is vital when installing the backplate onto a LGA 115x or 1366 Mainboard)

 

http://i1375.photobucket.com/albums/ag445/BlackOpsBoxes/Corsair%20Guide/Hydro.2_zps9wn6lzjj.jpg

 

 

Intel: LGA 115x, 1366 mounting hardware (notice LGA 115x standoff screws have the same amount of thread on both ends)

 

http://i1375.photobucket.com/albums/ag445/BlackOpsBoxes/Corsair%20Guide/Hydro.3_zpsu1skjzd6.jpg

 

 

Step 3, installing the Intel backplate onto the backside of Mainboard starts with the orientation of the notches in the backplate. It’s vital for a successful mounting having these two notches facing upward towards the top of the Mainboard and going around the two screws holding the CPU socket in place (if this part is skipped or improperly installed the cooler will not make proper contact).

 

Next, adjust the mounts at the four corners of backplate till they line up with the holes on the Mainboard for your specific CPU socket. Then install the standoff screws from front side into the backplate mounts around the CPU socket until hand tight. This will secure your backplate making it ready to install the CPU waterblock (on some Mainboards the backplate may feel loose, don't worry).

 

 

Correct mounting will look like this

 

http://i1375.photobucket.com/albums/ag445/BlackOpsBoxes/Corsair%20Guide/Hydro.4_zpsdsndpadx.jpg

 

Here’s a close up

 

http://i1375.photobucket.com/albums/ag445/BlackOpsBoxes/Corsair%20Guide/Hydro.5_zpsnq7wziuo.jpg

 

 

Step 4, position the mounting bracket over the top of the pump assembly and we're ready to install. Align the bracket and pump assembly over the four standoff screws, standoffs will go through the mounting bracket making it ready to secure.

 

The process I use when installing a CPU waterblock assembly, is once the mounting plate is lined up correctly and seated to the CPU, continue to apply lite pressure in the center of waterblock while installing all four thumb screws. Keep constant pressure holding the CPU waterblock in place, tighten the thumb screws until all four are have reached the mounting bracket but not making contact (this will ensure the mounting bracket is installed correctly and not off center). Once all four thumb screws are installed then we can start to tighten them by starting with the top left corner, moving to the bottom right corner, next moving to the bottom left corner and finally the top right corner. The thumb screws should be hand tightened first and then using a screw driver to make sure they have been secured to make proper contact, there’s no need to go overboard making them iron tight.

 

For those who are installing an Asetek made Hydro H50, H55, H75, H90, H105 and H110 pumps, installation of waterblock will be slightly different. The pump head on these models will have ears around the diameter of pump assembly, you will need to assemble the Intel Retention ring and clip onto the pump head. Retention ring will go over the top of pump head resting on the ears and clip installed from bottom of pump head locking the two piece together. If installed incorrectly the Retention ring will fall through the pump head. Once the pump head has been fitted with the retention ring and clip, you can follow the instructions above for secure the pump assembly.

 

Note: using the process above will ensure proper mounting of waterblock, since it is possible to tighten one side more than the other causing the pump assembly to make poor contact hence affecting the CPU temperature.

 

 

Apply pressure in center of CPU waterblock assembly

 

http://i1375.photobucket.com/albums/ag445/BlackOpsBoxes/Corsair%20Guide/Hydro.7_zpszruegbjl.jpg

 

When mounted correctly it will look like this

 

http://i1375.photobucket.com/albums/ag445/BlackOpsBoxes/Corsair%20Guide/Hydro.8_zpsmqqwr8bv.jpg

 

 

Finally, connecting power to the pump with the CPU FAN or CPU OPT port on the MainBoard. Newer Mainboards will only have 4-pin PWM headers that will accept the 3-pin pump connection. The 3-pin connection only reports the pump RPM or speed to BIOS since it’s not adjustable. Additionally your pump may have come with a mini USB cable for Corsair LINK (install into an open USB port on bottom of mainboard) and or SATA power cable (install the power cable to any SATA cable with an open connection).

 

We won't be talking about the radiator or fan installation since Corsair has provide sufficient information for mounting these two items.

 

So with that brings an end to our Hydro Series Installation Guide, fire your computer up and enjoy.

Edited by StealthGaming
Revision: Updating Image
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  • 2 weeks later...

While playing games system load should be around 50-60%, system temperature would be in the range of high 40C to low 50C.

 

Other factors to take into account is the voltage needed for a stable overclock. A mild overclock of 4.10GHz, voltage range will be 1.05 - 1.20V depending quality of CPU.

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Snak3doc,

 

Your temperatures are very high for gaming

 

 

During stress test temperatures should reach that high, but not a light system load

 

http://i1375.photobucket.com/albums/ag445/BlackOpsBoxes/Corsair%20Guide/CL%20AIDA%201_zpssitbluye.png

 

 

 

Heres an Core i7 3770k overclock of 4.30GHz on a system with H100i, these are optimal temperatures for system load and idle (ambient room temperature was 31C during this testing)

 

 

http://i1375.photobucket.com/albums/ag445/BlackOpsBoxes/Corsair%20Guide/OC1_zps6xmqgvgt.png

 

 

 

As you can see Corsair LINK is working without a issue in Windows 8.1

Edited by StealthGaming
Revision: Updating Image
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Unofficial Hydro Series Installation Guide - Cable Connections

 

 

 

With this part of the guide i'm going to be adding in some additional information and pictures for those who are installing H80i, H100i that requires some additional connection.

 

 

First - Mini USB Connection at the pump (plugs into the side of pump assembly)

 

http://i1375.photobucket.com/albums/ag445/BlackOpsBoxes/Corsair%20Guide/Hydro.13_zpspmobps4g.jpg

 

 

Second - Pumps SATA power Connection

 

http://i1375.photobucket.com/albums/ag445/BlackOpsBoxes/Corsair%20Guide/Hydro.18_zpsrq2tyrtq.jpg

 

 

Third - Connect Pump Sensor to CPU_FAN (most Mainboards will run this port at full speed, higher end Z87 & Z97 MainBoards will run both the CPU_FAN and CPU_OPT ports at full speed)

 

http://i1375.photobucket.com/albums/ag445/BlackOpsBoxes/Corsair%20Guide/Hydro.15_zpsd8lhk0rd.jpg

 

 

Fourth - Radiator Fan Connection (you can use either the pump or MainBoard to control these, the image shows fans connected to top of pump assembly with the supplied interface cable)

http://i1375.photobucket.com/albums/ag445/BlackOpsBoxes/Corsair%20Guide/Hydro.13---Copy_zpsdibltzm0.jpg

 

 

Fifth - USB interface cable Connection for Corsair LINK

 

http://i1375.photobucket.com/albums/ag445/BlackOpsBoxes/Corsair%20Guide/Hydro.12_zpszpldi68z.jpg

 

 

Heres an additional image of H100i backplate mounting on LGA 115x and 1366

 

http://i1375.photobucket.com/albums/ag445/BlackOpsBoxes/Corsair%20Guide/Hydro.16_zpsmbimxzel.jpg

 

 

Heres a closer look

 

http://i1375.photobucket.com/albums/ag445/BlackOpsBoxes/Corsair%20Guide/Hydro.17_zpsxqhmqtzg.jpg

 

 

I'll be adding in some additional information for those who are installing a Asetek made Hydro H50, H55, H75, H90, H105, H110 or the newly launched H80 GT and H100 GTX pumps, later next week.

Edited by StealthGaming
Revision: Adding Image
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  • 2 weeks later...

Unofficial Hydro Series Installation Guide - Asetek Pump Installation

 

This part of the guide, we'll be covering the installation of Asetek made Corsair Hydro Series H50, H55, H75, H90, H105 and H110 pumps. While it has more parts to put together, it’s quite easy and should take about 5 – 10 minutes depending on ones experience.

 

Step 1, upon opening your new Hydro Series Pump, take a few minutes to lay out all included parts on a flat surface and verify needed Mounting components were included in the box. Simply open the Corsair quick start guide to page no. 1 (included hardware) and compare the pictures with your hardware.

 

 

Mounting hardware

 

http://i1375.photobucket.com/albums/ag445/BlackOpsBoxes/Corsair%20Guide/Asetek%20Installation%20Guide/IMG_0198_zps9ps4g1vs.jpg

 

 

Step 2, this part of the guide will pertain to Intel LGA 775, 115x and 1366 mounting when installing a Asetek made Hydro H50, H55, H75, H90, H105 and H110 pumps. Those who are installing the newly launched H80i GT/H100i GTX Series pumps can skip this step since the retention bracket comes pre-installed from the factory.

 

Step 3, Retention bracket assembly. There several parts involved with the assembly, standoff bushings, upper retention bracket, retention bracket clip and standoffs.

 

Notice the 2-piece retention standoff bushings are marked on the sides for Socket that you're installing. These standoff bushing mount different ways for LGA 115x and 1366. They are easy to assemble, just insert into retention bracket and clip them together. Review the images below showing the installation.

 

 

Retention bracket mount

 

http://i1375.photobucket.com/albums/ag445/BlackOpsBoxes/Corsair%20Guide/Asetek%20Installation%20Guide/IMG_0199_zps1ffh98hl.jpg

 

Retention standoff bushing

 

http://i1375.photobucket.com/albums/ag445/BlackOpsBoxes/Corsair%20Guide/Asetek%20Installation%20Guide/IMG_0203_zpsaxvazd0f.jpg

 

 

Assembled Retention bracket - front view

 

http://i1375.photobucket.com/albums/ag445/BlackOpsBoxes/Corsair%20Guide/Asetek%20Installation%20Guide/IMG_0199_zps1ffh98hl.jpg

 

 

Assembled Retention bracket - rear view

 

http://i1375.photobucket.com/albums/ag445/BlackOpsBoxes/Corsair%20Guide/Asetek%20Installation%20Guide/IMG_0200_zpsnasr2jzw.jpg

 

 

Assembled Retention bracket with standoffs installed - front view

 

http://i1375.photobucket.com/albums/ag445/BlackOpsBoxes/Corsair%20Guide/Asetek%20Installation%20Guide/IMG_0209_zpsbgfofp4i.jpg

 

 

Assembled Retention bracket with standoffs installed - rear view

 

http://i1375.photobucket.com/albums/ag445/BlackOpsBoxes/Corsair%20Guide/Asetek%20Installation%20Guide/IMG_0213_zpszlrym8qq.jpg

 

Next comes fitting the Retention bracket to waterblock, the bracket sits on top of the ears made into the pump head assembly - rear view

 

http://i1375.photobucket.com/albums/ag445/BlackOpsBoxes/Corsair%20Guide/Asetek%20Installation%20Guide/IMG_0215_zpsq99smwfz.jpg

 

 

Completed Retention bracket installation with clip - rear view

 

http://i1375.photobucket.com/albums/ag445/BlackOpsBoxes/Corsair%20Guide/Asetek%20Installation%20Guide/IMG_0216_zps53xzljou.jpg

 

 

Completed Retention bracket installation with clip - Front View

 

http://i1375.photobucket.com/albums/ag445/BlackOpsBoxes/Corsair%20Guide/Asetek%20Installation%20Guide/IMG_0218_zpsvjupesya.jpg

 

 

Step 4, installing the backplate onto the backside of Mainboard. Those who are installing a LGA 775, 115x or 1366, take note that the pins insert into the mounting in different position for each socket. Once pins have been installed, just line up with the mounting holes on your MainBoard and insert the standoffs from the front. The standoffs just need to be hand tight, no need to go overboard making them iron tight. If you're using Intel: LGA 2011, 2011-v3 or AMD: AM2, AM3, FM1, FM2 you can skip this step since you'll be using the backplate that came with your MainBoard.

 

 

Backplate with LGA Socket pin location

 

http://i1375.photobucket.com/albums/ag445/BlackOpsBoxes/Corsair%20Guide/Asetek%20Installation%20Guide/IMG_0201_zpsqcgh7nfz.jpg

 

Backplate with retainer pins installed

 

http://i1375.photobucket.com/albums/ag445/BlackOpsBoxes/Corsair%20Guide/Asetek%20Installation%20Guide/IMG_0202_zpsvf6dq3u3.jpg

 

 

Backplate installed onto MainBoard

 

http://i1375.photobucket.com/albums/ag445/BlackOpsBoxes/Corsair%20Guide/Asetek%20Installation%20Guide/IMG_0205_zpsrw0km7fe.jpg

 

 

Step 5, Align the pump assembly with retention bracket with the backplate pins, standoffs will screw through the MainBoard into the pins making the assembly secure.

 

The process I use when installing a CPU waterblock assembly, is once the mounting bracket is lined up correctly and seated to the CPU, continue to apply lite pressure in the center of waterblock while installing the standoffs (just partially tighten them for now since this step will be repeated, the goal is to install the bracket properly so it does go off center causing poor contact with the IHS). Once all standoffs are installed then we can start to secure them starting in the top left corner, moving to the bottom right corner, next moving to the bottom left corner and finally the right top corner. The standoffs should be hand tightened first and then screw driver making sure they are secure to make proper contact, there’s need to go overboard making them iron tight.

 

Finally, connecting power to the pump with the CPU_FAN or CPU_OPT port on the MainBoard. Newer Mainboards will use 4-pin PWM headers that will accept the 3-pin pump connection. The 3-pin connection only reports the pump RPM or speed to BIOS since it’s not adjustable. Connect the fan to any open fan header on the MainBoard (does have to be connect to the CPU_OPT, CHA_FAN or SYS_Fan can also be used). Note: on some high end MainBoards from Z87 and newer will run both the CPU_FAN and CPU_OPT fan ports at full speed.

 

 

Bonus picture - TIM (Thermal Interface Material) installation

 

http://i1375.photobucket.com/albums/ag445/BlackOpsBoxes/Corsair%20Guide/Asetek%20Installation%20Guide/IMG_0206_zpsdlpq9lqb.jpg

Edited by StealthGaming
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Successfully working LINK with Windows 8.1

 

 

I've seen many complaints and comments with regards to Corsair LINK and Windows 8.1 compatibility, so I decided to post a known working LINK to help other members.

 

Background History:

 

Corsair LINK was launched in January 2011 at the CES show in Las Vegas. What you may or may not know is that Corsair LINK software was developed by CoolIT. CoolIT proprietary software is leased by Corsair with their own Branding. CoolIT ECO III solutions encompass the Hydro series H60, H80i, H100i and newly launched H110i GT.

 

With Windows 8.1 came the introduction to power management improvements which helps reduce power consumption and extend battery life on mobile computers. When a USB device presents itself as a Human Interface Device (HID), Windows 8.1 can suspend this device to reduce power. Known issues or symptoms: when you connect a USB device to a computer running Windows 8.1, the device is suspended and doesn't recharge.

 

This feature may be great for portable computers but doesn't benefit nor is it useful for a desktop computer, additionally it has been creating many issues for people who are experiencing problems with the LINK interface.

 

Step 1, Pre-Configuration:

 

- Disable legacy USB devices (UEFI) prior to installation

- Install Window 8.1 in UEFI mode

 

Step 2, Connecting devices

 

- Connect devices to Corsair LINK (Corsair LINK Commander or LINK Commander mini, Cooling Node, Fans, Temperature Sensors, Lighting Node with RGB LED Strips, Corsair Hydro USB, and Corsair H100i. When using a LINK Commander with the Hydro series pump, be sure to install into a separate USB connection port).

 

- If your MainBoard doesn't support more than one USB connection, a separate USB port expander would be required (NZXT makes a nice internal USB expansion port that will allow 3 additional USB connections for devices).

 

Step 3, Update Procedure:

 

- Install all MainBoard Firmware Updates (UEFI/BIOS, chipset, USB drivers, etc.)

- Apply all available Microsoft Updates for Windows. Allow Windows to restart as necessary while "Configuring Windows". Updates should apply without issues.

 

Step 4, Corsair LINK installation

 

Download the Corsair LINK software. Right click the download and install software via elevated or admin. Allow the Corsair LINK to install correctly including firmware updates for connected components (don't cancel anything during the installation).

 

Restart computer, Corsair LINK should appear (LINK default setting will "Run at Windows Startup", disable this since it's not necessary). The LINK will still run in the background.

 

Open Corsair LINK, the H100i may show all zeroes. Other system information Corsair LINK obtains comes from the MainBoard (CPU Temp, CPU Activity, GPU Temp and Fan, and Hard Drive Temp) should be present and accurate. To confirm information is correct, enter UEFI and compare with the information inside UEFI.

 

 

FIRMWARE Versions are as follows:

 

Corsair LINK Version 2.7.5361 or 2.7.5339

Corsair Hydro USB - 2.0.0

Corsair H100i - 1.0.7

Corsair Commander - 2.0.6

Corsair Cooling Node - 1.2.5

Corsair Lighting Node - 1.1.9

 

Step 5, Registry Edit:

 

If the registry edit is required, make sure to follow the instructions below exactly. SGC assumes no responsibility for any issues that would arise from incorrect or improperly entered information which could corrupt the Operating System.

 

Corsair Registry is identified by VID_1B1C.

 

Registry changes are needed to the USB\VID_1B1C&PID_0C02 and USB\VID_1B1C&PID_0C04 Registry items.

 

>Open search and type regedit

>Right click and run regedit in elevated or admin

>Open registry and look for HKey Local Machine\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Enum\USB\VID_1B1C&PID_0C02.

>Edit each path string you see under this (numbers and ampersands smashed together), expand the Device Parameters, then right click and select modify to change the DWORD settings (value data) to 0 (0 = disable).

>Next do the same for AllowIdleIrpInD3, DeviceSelectiveSuspended, EnhancedPowerManagementEnabled, SelectiveSuspendEnabled.

>Make the same edits for USB\VID_1B1C&PID_0C04.

 

After Registry edit is complete, reboot the computer and all icons should appear on the left side of the Corsair LINK window. Next delete the old icons with the zero's, followed by moving the new icons to their proper location or where you would like them. Save the Profile, Reboot computer, reopen Corsair LINK. Now everything should be working as intended.

 

The only known issue that is not addressed would be H100 saving the user defined color after restarting the computer.

 

Here's a quick workaround:

 

Set the LED color you would like on the Hydro pump head

 

Example RED

Adjust - R 255,

Adjust - G 1 or 2,

Adjust - B 1 or 2

 

On start the H100 will start with a White color for a few seconds until Corsair LINK software is initialized, it will then apply the color that was selected.

 

Once everything is working properly, correct values will be displayed and you will now be able control fans with custom curve profiles.

Edited by StealthGaming
Adding LINK information
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  • 2 weeks later...
Thank you for the great post. I seem to have installed the back-plate upside down with the notches pointing downwards. Can I reseat it without reapplying the thermal paste? I only just installed it on Friday the 1st of may so its still new.
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Yes, the backplate can be swapped to correct position without removing the pump head, but it will require removal of the pump head mounting bracket and a second pair of hands to keep pressure on the pump head against the CPU die cap.

 

It should not pose an issue if the pump head needs to be removed and reseated, just monitor the CPU temperature if it becomes to high than the TIM will need replaced.

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  • 1 month later...

can you tell me if it's possible to get replacements for the CPU mounting screws for my H60?

 

Or if it's possible to replace them with off the shelf parts?

 

specifically, these are exactly what I'm looking for as I've lost them and need to re-fit my H60.

 

http://i1375.photobucket.com/albums/ag445/BlackOpsBoxes/Corsair%20Guide/Hydro.3_zps4mfgy84u.jpg

 

I *think* the thread is M3 (but I'm not 100% sure), but I'm also not sure what length the standoffs need to be either, so I don't want to go ordering stuff until I can be sure i'm getting the right parts.

 

thanks for your time.

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can you tell me if it's possible to get replacements for the CPU mounting screws for my H60?.

 

The hardware is part of the mounting kit that can be purchased through the Corsair store.

 

Here's the link:

 

http://www.corsair.com/en-us/hydro-series-h60-h80-h100-universal-bracket-kit

 

 

However, i would contact Corsair Customer Service to see if they will send the stand offs and thumb screws.

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  • 1 month later...

I had to register just to thank OP for this guide. I was having so much high temp issues that I finally gave up. I have 0 experience with AIO coolers except what I have right now and I have an H60 v2 and an H80i.

 

I had been swapping between the both of them with serious temperature issues. Both were bought online from people who had been using them for some time so eventually I gave up. I just figured that either the coolers had done their thing in this lifetime or that my chip was just bad.

 

For some reason I decided to google a bit more and came about another thread in which you directed that OP to this thread. I thought "how much of a difference can the backplate adjustement even do"... turns out, about 9-10C difference! I was idling out at 42-43C until I adjusted the backplate according to your pictures and voila, idling out at 32C. Even under P95 load it doesn't even reach 60C at stock!

 

It just never struck my mind to check the backplate before I put it on, and seeing how it didn't offer any type of resistance even though those two screws was in the way it never came to me even by simple logic. And even between the swappings I noticed that just by looking at the thermal paste it seemed like the pump was making sufficient contact with the lid of the CPU.

 

Anyway, I've babbled on enough now. Thank you so very much for making my head hurt less :)

Edited by ToBeHonest
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  • 1 month later...

Thanks for the instructions. It helped.

But I still have issues: At idle in windows 7 I'm at 70 degrees C. I can get it down to 60 by adjusting the fans with the Gigabyte software that came with my motherboard. I don't dare run it under load. it's far enough off that I must have mounted it wrong. It's difficult with my case (SG05) but many have done it. One thing of note, I replaced the fan with a Noctua NFP12 wpm.

 

The tubes are under more pressure than I would like. I think maybe that is causing difficulty in mounting the pump squarely. I'm thinking about mounting the pump first, then the fan and radiator.

 

Is that a good idea (mount pump first)?

Will I need to remove and replace the thermal compound?

Is the Noctua fan up to the task?

 

 

AAHHA! Solved: if you have a z77 gigabyte MB, you can only orient the pump with the Corsair logo perpendicular to the ram. Otherwise part of the copper base rests on some capacitors. I win the idiot award.

 

GA-z77n-wifi, i7-3770k, Fan plugged into CPU header, Pump into system fan header.

Edited by michaelcly
Solved!
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  • 4 weeks later...
I am finishing up a build and was stumped by the SATA power connector and the 3 wire connection to the motherboard. Do I connect both of these in addition to the Corsair Link USB cable. I am installing a H110i GTX on a Gigabyte GA-Z170X-Gaming 7 board.
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  • 2 weeks later...

Hey,

 

Thanks for posting this guide - I have an old 775 system which I want to pair with a Corsair H90, but I gather that the newer coolers don't include 775 brackets anymore?

 

It looks like I can source spare parts on eBay, but I'm wondering exactly which parts do I need to buy?

 

Cheers,

 

Su

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  • 2 months later...

Stealthgaming, thank you for all the posting.

 

Unfortunately, in 2013, Corsair changed their pump mounting hardware for the Asetek made Hydro series completely that look very different from your mid 2015 posts.

 

I have a LGA775 motherboard and found that the only way to install the H75 is to get the Asetek mounting kit.

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Asetek-Liquid-Cooler-Intel-LGA775-Retention-Ring-Kit-/280938268278

 

Corsair will not sell you the original series mounting hardware anymore. I found all this out only after I purchased the Corsair H75 kit.

 

While waiting for the Asetek mounting kit to arrive, I decide to do surgery on the Corsair hardware.

 

1. You must have a LGA775 generic backplate. I expect almost any generic one will work. But you cannot modify the Corsair one coming with the H75 kit.

 

2. The mounting slots on the metal bracket must be move inboard 1/8" each. I tried to drill it out, but it did not work. Corsair use good gauge hard metal for the bracket. It ruin the drill bit, even carbide ones, quickly.

 

3. My Dermal with the thin cutting plate did the trick for me. It takes time and must be done carefully. Spark flies, so wear work gloves. The result looks really ugly, but it allows me to mount the water pump head properly and securely on the 775 motherboard.

 

I have an Intel Core 2 Quad Q9550. The CPU temperature runs about 60-65°C with stock cooler. It drops to under 50°C with an Artic-Cooling Freezer 7 Pro. The case is a Lian Li VC-P1200 Plus. When I mounted the H75, the CPU temperature dropped to 24°C in a 20° basement office at normal CPU frequency of 2.83 GHz. I can easily overclock to 3.2 GHz whereas the CPU raised to 29°C. I cannot be happier. I can push the CPU to higher OC frequency, but will stay at 3.2 GHz for now.

 

The H75 kit comes with 2 120mm PWM fans. I have 2 PWM header (4-pin type) on the Gigabyte motherboard (EP45-UD3R). The fans are somewhat noisy if running at full 1950 rpm. Using the MB smart fan control and 4-pin header, they are quite and at 900 and 1100 rpm at CPU and System2 header respectively. Raising the fans to higher rpm has little impact to the CPU temperature.

Edited by keilau02
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  • 10 months later...
Stealthgaming, thank you for all the posting.

 

Unfortunately, in 2013, Corsair changed their pump mounting hardware for the Asetek made Hydro series completely that look very different from your mid 2015 posts.

 

I have a LGA775 motherboard and found that the only way to install the H75 is to get the Asetek mounting kit.

 

1. You must have a LGA775 generic backplate. I expect almost any generic one will work. But you cannot modify the Corsair one coming with the H75 kit.

 

2. The mounting slots on the metal bracket must be move inboard 1/8" each. I tried to drill it out, but it did not work. Corsair use good gauge hard metal for the bracket. It ruin the drill bit, even carbide ones, quickly.

 

3. My Dermal with the thin cutting plate did the trick for me. It takes time and must be done carefully. Spark flies, so wear work gloves. The result looks really ugly, but it allows me to mount the water pump head properly and securely on the 775 motherboard.

 

I have an Intel Core 2 Quad Q9550.

Regarding the installation of a Hydro Series on LGA775, I did this today, with an H105 (Asetek big brother to the H75) in fact.

 

I actually bought the H105 some time ago for this but never got around to installing it. I was going to buy the Asetek LGA775 install kit from eBay as well but realized it was going to cost me nearly $30 after shipping to Canada. I have several Asetek-based coolers though so I remembered that the older Asetek backplates already have provisions for LGA775. It's just that the top retainer/pressure plate don't have inserts for this socket (the inserts work two ways, for just about every socket but LGA775!). I'm not exactly sure why they did this as compatibility for 775 seems all too easy--it's just the mount points are slightly further inwards.

 

Anyway I pulled the backplate from an LGA1156 system I have using the old version and repositioned the little screw collars to the S775 position. On that system I just used the limited-travel backplate from the H105, without issue, keeping the rest of the hardware on that the same (top-plate, inserts, mounting screws).

 

Since the newer top plate has smaller holes, it's easier to drill those out than to try to figure out how to possibly mount the older top-plate/screws (with the inserts) to a 775. I'm not sure why the person above had troubles drilling out the plate--it's pretty thin/flimsy and drilling was fairly easy with titanium-coated bits. I just drilled out each side closer inwards. On the newer CoolIt-derived units (like the H60 2013, H80i, H100i) I'd imagine drilling the top-plate is just as easy but you'd need the generic backplate as mentioned. On the older CoolIt ones (original H100, etc.) I think they actually have enough provision already to mount on 775--these were actually marketed with 775 support IIRC.

 

Anyway I realized I had no idea what happened to the proper mount standoffs (the ones with M3 threads on either side) for my H105! So I had to devise something else. The standoffs for LGA2011 (Edit: These are the AMD standoffs, the black ones!) have one side threaded M3 or whatever (that can go into the backplate) and the other side is 6-32 imperial thread, which presumably threads into the AMD board when you're installing on that. So what I did was I just got some Nylock-insert 6-32 nuts from Home Depot (Nylock is not required but it was only 3 cents more per nut, and hey they can't back out :cool: ). These were used in place of the thumbscrews and easily hand tightened with an appropriate socket. In other words I basically used the AMD standoffs in reverse/upside down. Note: This would be totally unnecessary if I had the proper standoffs, I just couldn't find them--all that is normally required is a proper backplate and drilling out the top-plate.

 

I couldn't use the top-plate retaining ring (which is funny because I always forget to put that thing on Asetek coolers anyway, lol) as it would have hit capacitors around the socket. That plastic ring is by no means necessary though, it just makes install slightly easier. Got it on, tightened down the nuts I got from HD and done--installed perfectly fine. I have attached pictures of my handywork! :D:

 

The results were actually pretty great! I also have a Q9550 (in the form of a Xeon X3360), but it's OC'd to 3.6Ghz. This machine was previously struggling with an old low-profile heatpipe cooler from Thermalright (was pretty good on a C2D, not so good on an OC'd Quad). Previously I couldn't get the temp under 70C under LinX loading (in fact it went upwards of 80 under sustained load). I kept using the machine as it was but was never comfortable with the temps on it, under heavy load.

 

Now with the H105 under LinX load for 15-20 mins, it won't even get to 60C! I actually have a slight mixup of fans, I have one 2700 RPM SP120 (included) on the top but on the bottom I have an SP120 Quiet (1500 RPM). Basically SpeedFan is regulating them such that they basically have the same speed range despite one being voltage-controlled and the other PWM. If the temp gets above 60C on Core 0 (which is ~5 degrees higher than the rest--always has been on this CPU), the top will ramp to 100%, but it rarely ever does that as even under LinX it won't get there easily and if it does it's only a few seconds. But at ~1500 RPM on both fans, it's enough to keep the temp at around 57-58C on the high-reading core. In regular use the fans run much slower and the problem now? My PSU fan is louder than everything else, LOL!

 

Idle is a little different. Since C2Qs don't have the idle benefits of new processors and there's no dynamic voltage (not on my board anyway) I have to have it set to 1.25625V in BIOS to run stable at that clock (after vDroop it's actually just around 1.18V under load). So the idle temp is 34-39C depending on what core you look at since Core 0 always reads higher than the rest on my CPU. A bit higher than the idle temps for most other Hydro units on Nehalem and later CPUs but ok. The load temps are fantastic, I have to say. Definitely happy putting the H105 on that machine :D:

 

Anyway,I just don't understand why these coolers all dropped LGA775 support since all it needs, is a backplate and top-plate that has provisions "further in" than they have existing. It's not like they have to include all-new hardware here! But no matter, it's super easy to mod the newer top plates, and if you have an old Asetek-unit backplate or get a generic one, you'll be totally in business for LGA775 CPUs, provided you don't have any capacitor-clearance issues, which you probably won't on the Asetek ones if you don't use the installation ring. The newer CoolIt ones, I'm not sure as the square blocks may have more issues there but one would have to try with their particular unit and board to find out.

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Edited by WindowsRevenge
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  • 1 year later...
I purchased H60 cooler to mout on ASYS P7P55d-E board 1156 CPU socket. My case is a Cooler Master which has vent holes but no opening behind the CPU. The only way to mount the cooler brack would be to remove the motherboard. Is there a way to mount the H60 without the bracket on the backoftheMB?
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I purchased H60 cooler to mout on ASYS P7P55d-E board 1156 CPU socket. My case is a Cooler Master which has vent holes but no opening behind the CPU. The only way to mount the cooler brack would be to remove the motherboard. Is there a way to mount the H60 without the bracket on the backoftheMB?

 

Aside from strapping it down with duct tape? No. The bracket is key to keeping the cold plate and CPU in contact. Any play there will lead to instant disappointment and startling temperatures as the heat cannot be conducted out of the CPU efficiently.

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