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High Temps & smell with H100i and 4790k


markob53

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Since building my computer I’ve had a recurring issue with it, basically I can smell hot air coming from my case when I play a demanding game. It’s got to the point where I suspect the CPU/CPU cooling.

 

Some specs…

 

NZXT H440 Case

i7 4790K (stock) cooled with Corsair H100i (2x roof fans as exhaust)

MSI 780 TI (stock) cooled with custom bracket & Corsair H55 (2x front intake fans in push/pull)

EVGA 850w Supernova G2

 

I have enquired about this problem so much since I built my pc without getting to the bottom of it (in fact if you google ‘smell + H440’ chances are you’ll find my threads)…anyway, originally I didn’t have the h55 on the GPU but I added it to see if it would help the problem (it did improves temps dramatically but the smell remained) I also switched the default front fans for Noctua focused flow fans, yet I can still smell it, it actually smells like hot radiator.

 

I recorded some temps after 3 hours of playing Shadow of Mordor and this is what I got according to MSI Afterburner…

 

GPU Max Temp: 54c

GPU Max Usage: 98

Cpu1 Max Temp: 66c

Cpu1 Max Usage – 60

 

Other responses I got seemed to suggest that whilst 66c isn’t bad it is bad for a H100i?

 

Here are some final notes.

 

- My CPU sits between 30c-35c on ‘Idle’,

- My GPU never usually goes above 25c ‘Idle’

- It’s not the PSU because that Is basically stone cold when I game.

- I have never heard water splashing around in my H100i (I have In my H55)

- My BIOS reports the H100i is pumping at around 2200 rpm

- In order to get those good temps on the GPU I had to put the H55 in push/pull configuration, and I was thinking about doing the same for the H100i, but shouldn’t my temps be lower without push/pull?

- The NZXT H440 is known for poor airflow

- I have tried to reverse the fans on the H100i as intakes, the smell remained

- I have re-seated the block many times

- When I installed the H100i, I removed the bit of plastic on the bracket as it didn’t seem to fit and stuck out a bit

 

I know this is a long post but I wanted to get every detail over, my plan was to reseat the cooler and try push/pull on the H100i and use premium thermal paste but there might be a better solution I can try? I appreciate any help.

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I've noticed a smell from my system too while using an H100i, but my temps never exceeded 56C, and they sit around 30-33C idle. How old is your system? I've chocked up the smell to the 'burn in time' since I haven't had any issues with my CPU or GPU. I never had the smell until I hit 50C about a week after I built my comp, and I can occasionally smell it again when it hits that temp or higher. My comp is only three weeks old now.
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I've noticed a smell from my system too while using an H100i, but my temps never exceeded 56C, and they sit around 30-33C idle. How old is your system? I've chocked up the smell to the 'burn in time' since I haven't had any issues with my CPU or GPU. I never had the smell until I hit 50C about a week after I built my comp, and I can occasionally smell it again when it hits that temp or higher. My comp is only three weeks old now.

 

It’s about 4 months old I think, certainly less than 6 months old. I heard about the burn in smell and new hardware smell but I feel like I’ve gotten past that point now, plus it only seems to be bad when I play new game or when I play an old game at high fps.

 

I know that all radiators have some sort of smell when there ‘on’ but this just seems too severe, I don’t think it’s normal that when you’re gaming you should be able to smell warm air if your temps are normal. My girlfriend actually asked me if I could smell smoke the other day when I was on it, and this was after less than 30mins on Shadow of Mordor, this was the worst it’s been as the room was very warm already.

 

I’ve noticed your temps are 10c lower than mine, I also noticed that whenever I’ve ran Prime95 using the small FFT test it would hit between 90-100c instantly.

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So, small FFT test is a poor indicator of real world temps and cooling. Nothing gets your system that hot, especially if all you're doing is gaming. If you look at my specs, you'll notice that I'm running a 5820K, and I'm not even sure what the CPU% was when I hit 56C since I wasn't running CPUID at the time. Your pump speed looks fine, so unless it's a back plate issue, I can't think what would be causing it. Unless you haven't taxed your system like this in the past. If you're running hardware intesive games, but weren't doing so previously, then you'll probably experience that smell for a while.

 

Does it smell like smoke to you? Or just warm electronics?

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So, small FFT test is a poor indicator of real world temps and cooling. Nothing gets your system that hot, especially if all you're doing is gaming. If you look at my specs, you'll notice that I'm running a 5820K, and I'm not even sure what the CPU% was when I hit 56C since I wasn't running CPUID at the time. Your pump speed looks fine, so unless it's a back plate issue, I can't think what would be causing it. Unless you haven't taxed your system like this in the past. If you're running hardware intesive games, but weren't doing so previously, then you'll probably experience that smell for a while.

 

Does it smell like smoke to you? Or just warm electronics?

 

It smells basically like a very hot radiator or the kind of warm air smell you would get if you put your head under a hand dryer or hair dryer, usually when i play more demanding games i try to cool the room down prior to playing it in order to reduce the effect but it's still very much present.

 

I have left my pc on for 10 hours on the Shadow of Mordor title screen (which actually causes quite a bit of usage) and the smell was there when i got back but the computer was working just fine, so i have 'burned in' the hardware.

 

It really is a strange issue as no one seems to be able to put there figure on whats wrong, i think at this rate im just going to have to go push/pull in order to reduce the temps...i really don't think i should have to though.

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I had what sounds like a similar smell a couple of years ago, which I eventually tracked to my PSU, everything seemed ok with it, but when I swapped it for a spare that I had, the smell disappeared. A friend told me that it was likely down to some of the small components in the PSU heating up.
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I had what sounds like a similar smell a couple of years ago, which I eventually tracked to my PSU, everything seemed ok with it, but when I swapped it for a spare that I had, the smell disappeared. A friend told me that it was likely down to some of the small components in the PSU heating up.

 

I'm pretty sure it's not my PSU as i have felt it when running a game and it was pretty cold, would the PSU only show signs of overheating & cause a smell when running a demanding game though?

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The draw on your PSU would increase with utilization of other components. So when you play a demanding game, your GPU will be taxed heavily and your CPU will be taxed more than normal (but not as heavily as your GPU). As these components draw more power to increase their performance to handle the demand you place on them, your PSU will be forced to work harder and get hotter.
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The draw on your PSU would increase with utilization of other components. So when you play a demanding game, your GPU will be taxed heavily and your CPU will be taxed more than normal (but not as heavily as your GPU). As these components draw more power to increase their performance to handle the demand you place on them, your PSU will be forced to work harder and get hotter.

 

I will have another check of the PSU but i honestly don't think it's that. Also it's a brand new EVGA Super NOVA 850W, which i hear is a pretty good one.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Had a check of the PSU whilst gaming last night, doesn't feel warm at all.

 

The side window of the case does feel warm and my processor temps ranged from mid 50's to mid 60's across all cores playing Shadow of Mordor for 30 - 40 mins. GPU temp didn't go above 50 and was consistently around early to mid 40's.

 

This problem is incredibly frustrating, even more so that no one on the whole internet seems to have had the problem or know how to fix it.

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Since you're not melting metal and plastic and your temperatures are within normal operating ranges, the most likely culprit is a foreign material that would react at your ambient temperatures. Are you able to discern a more specific location for the smell? If you are confident it's not the power supply, see if you can trace it to either the GPU, exhaust through the radiator, or at the CPU block. When you say a hot smell, I think about my old car from college that after a brisk 200 mi drive through the mountains would smell like hot radiator metal and coolant when I stopped. Is that the kind of smell we're talking about? If yes, and it's very strong on the exhaust side of the radiator, then it's possible a very tiny amount of coolant is being vaporized during use. Replace.

 

If you can smell it at the CPU block, it's possible a foreign material got stuck in with paste and is heating up. This is probably less likely. Something big enough to cause a noticeable smell would also be large enough to cause temp problems for one of your cores. Double check to make sure each of your cores is operating at the same temperature -- not just the "CPU" temp reported for the general area. Bear in mind a less than perfect application of TIM might also cause core variances. You can clean and remount it. Any thermal paste on the edge of socket that might be heating up?

 

Hopefully, the smell is not coming from your GPU and we won't dwell on the possibilities.

 

I am sure I will regret writing this, but is the smell hot and wet? Or hot and dry? There is only once spot for water in your case with an obvious source. Hot and dry is far more common and tends to be what frying circuit or capacitor might smell like. Unfortunately, there are more places it could be coming from.

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Since you're not melting metal and plastic and your temperatures are within normal operating ranges, the most likely culprit is a foreign material that would react at your ambient temperatures. Are you able to discern a more specific location for the smell? If you are confident it's not the power supply, see if you can trace it to either the GPU, exhaust through the radiator, or at the CPU block. When you say a hot smell, I think about my old car from college that after a brisk 200 mi drive through the mountains would smell like hot radiator metal and coolant when I stopped. Is that the kind of smell we're talking about? If yes, and it's very strong on the exhaust side of the radiator, then it's possible a very tiny amount of coolant is being vaporized during use. Replace.

 

If you can smell it at the CPU block, it's possible a foreign material got stuck in with paste and is heating up. This is probably less likely. Something big enough to cause a noticeable smell would also be large enough to cause temp problems for one of your cores. Double check to make sure each of your cores is operating at the same temperature -- not just the "CPU" temp reported for the general area. Bear in mind a less than perfect application of TIM might also cause core variances. You can clean and remount it. Any thermal paste on the edge of socket that might be heating up?

 

Hopefully, the smell is not coming from your GPU and we won't dwell on the possibilities.

 

I am sure I will regret writing this, but is the smell hot and wet? Or hot and dry? There is only once spot for water in your case with an obvious source. Hot and dry is far more common and tends to be what frying circuit or capacitor might smell like. Unfortunately, there are more places it could be coming from.

 

Thanks for the detailed reply.

 

The smell does seem to originate nearer the top of the case where the H100i is located, I have placed my hand in the case when it was warm in the past and the further I went down the cooler it became. I’m pretty sure my GPU isn’t responsible because of the good temps I’m getting on it, I do have the radiator attached to the GPU setup as in intake, which means the hot air isn’t being flushed out but rather staying in, I may amend this setup in future but I had these issues before I installed custom cooling on the GPU, when it would hit 70c.

 

When I played Shadow of Mordor last night my room was actually very cold on purpose, when I played it the other day in a warmer room my girlfriend actually said she could smell smoke in the room, it was bad. If I have to replace the coolant doesn’t that mean I have a dud H100i? I have re-seated the block several times, but not for a while. Originally I wanted to overclock it and found it hitting 100c in prime95 at stock, so re-seated it a couple of times in order to try and improve temps so I doubt anything is trapped, same goes for the thermal paste. I followed a few guides on the best way to apply it.

 

Pretty sure it’s a hot and dry smell and like I say it only does it during demanding games, even games that aren’t as demanding but produce very high fps give off the smell, but not so demanding games with vsync on are generally fine.

 

Something else I noticed is when I got my H55 for my GPU I noticed that whenever I turn my computer on it makes a slight ‘splash’ noise, almost like the coolant is beginning to move for the first time, then It goes silent, which is fine. But I have never heard any sort of splash or water effect from my H100i. I’ve only heard it move around when I shake it which made me wonder if something was wrong with it.

 

Another thing to note, because i have messed with the H100i a few times a couple of the holes for the screws on the rad have expanded and become threaded which means one of the fans isn't tight to the radiator on one side, BUT i can't remember if i could smell the heat prior to this happening.

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OK, if it's a dry smell, it's not leaking coolant. But yes, if it was you would replace the entire unit. All of the Corsair coolers are sealed units -- you don't add anything and shouldn't open them up. Let's put that aside for the moment.

 

You've already re-seated the block multiple times and you temps are in-line with what you would expect. I think we can exclude this for the time being and the hot dry smell makes me think of other problems anyway.

 

Of note to me is you mentioned the smell is not as bad when using v-sync or another frame limiter. The GPU is the device most influenced that load. I think we need to focus on this area for now. Obviously, you are running a water cooled GPU set-up. What model card are you running and how is the H55 positioned in your case? 54C under load? Since water cooled GPU's are quite cool compared to the air versions, I am a little more concerned about the GPU circuit board. We need to be able to pin point the source.

 

So it's an NZXT 440, air intake from the front (maybe), H100 (CPU) as intake in the roof, and H55 (GPU) as exhaust in the rear 120? Do you have a reading for your case ambient temps? MoBo, whatever else is available? I can see why you ran the H100 as intake. I would probably do the same with a water cooled GPU and that case, but it does put hot air onto the mainboard.

 

As for the splash, my H110 does it do. Just a gentle little whoosh on start up. I don't remember my H80i every doing that, but one of my old H50's did. There may be just the slightest bit of air in the system or perhaps the pump kicks on to full speed quickly enough to create the effect. I certainly isn't effecting my H110's performance. As for the screws, your safe in the corner and the water has been routed away from the thread holes for the obvious reasons. I missed a hole on an H80i by a good few mm once. No puncture and rad never failed. As for the fan, being loose might cause vibrations, but not smell. If there is an intrusion and we have friction, that's another matter, but I doubt you would miss the noise it would make. Theoretically, any of your fans with a electrical problem could be causing the smell, but I think it would be easier to locate.

 

The 'smells like smoke' part is a bit worrying, and I would be cautious. Dry and hot like an electrical short offers up a lot of possibilities, but the biggest clue is the reduction when using an FPS limiter. That screams GPU and that's where I would focus for now.

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OK, if it's a dry smell, it's not leaking coolant. But yes, if it was you would replace the entire unit. All of the Corsair coolers are sealed units -- you don't add anything and shouldn't open them up. Let's put that aside for the moment.

 

You've already re-seated the block multiple times and you temps are in-line with what you would expect. I think we can exclude this for the time being and the hot dry smell makes me think of other problems anyway.

 

Of note to me is you mentioned the smell is not as bad when using v-sync or another frame limiter. The GPU is the device most influenced that load. I think we need to focus on this area for now. Obviously, you are running a water cooled GPU set-up. What model card are you running and how is the H55 positioned in your case? 54C under load? Since water cooled GPU's are quite cool compared to the air versions, I am a little more concerned about the GPU circuit board. We need to be able to pin point the source.

 

So it's an NZXT 440, air intake from the front (maybe), H100 (CPU) as intake in the roof, and H55 (GPU) as exhaust in the rear 120? Do you have a reading for your case ambient temps? MoBo, whatever else is available? I can see why you ran the H100 as intake. I would probably do the same with a water cooled GPU and that case, but it does put hot air onto the mainboard.

 

As for the splash, my H110 does it do. Just a gentle little whoosh on start up. I don't remember my H80i every doing that, but one of my old H50's did. There may be just the slightest bit of air in the system or perhaps the pump kicks on to full speed quickly enough to create the effect. I certainly isn't effecting my H110's performance. As for the screws, your safe in the corner and the water has been routed away from the thread holes for the obvious reasons. I missed a hole on an H80i by a good few mm once. No puncture and rad never failed. As for the fan, being loose might cause vibrations, but not smell. If there is an intrusion and we have friction, that's another matter, but I doubt you would miss the noise it would make. Theoretically, any of your fans with a electrical problem could be causing the smell, but I think it would be easier to locate.

 

The 'smells like smoke' part is a bit worrying, and I would be cautious. Dry and hot like an electrical short offers up a lot of possibilities, but the biggest clue is the reduction when using an FPS limiter. That screams GPU and that's where I would focus for now.

 

Ok i may have made some progress.

 

I got to thinking about the GPU, even though i have reduced my temps by 20c i still have a H55 rad pumping hot air into the case, which i imagine was the problem before i water cooled the card when it was running at 70c.

 

So i decided to flip the fans round on the rad in the front of the case to exhaust, i noticed an increase in idle temps from around 20c to 30c (presumably because the fans were no longer blowing cold air onto an idle rad) so i started up Shadow of Mordor and noticed a small improvement, although the case was still hot and the smell was still their.

 

So i took the front panel and dust guard off the front to allow the warm air to exhaust straight out and it basically cleared up the problem, no more smell! I had Shadow of Mordor on for about 30 mins in game and an hour on the title screen (which still reaches 70% GPU usage) and my GPU temps didn't exceed 50c and CPU cores didn't go above 55c, the case window actually felt cold along with the rear exhaust fan.

 

The thing is i don't want to have the front panel off so i figure the best course of action is to move the H55 rad to the rear in push/pull, replacing my 140mm exhaust fan, this will provide a bigger vent to exhaust that hot air (the vents on the H440 are tiny) it will also mean i have 3 dedicated intakes in the front.

 

The only thing that concerns me is why i would have this issue in the first place on a stock 780ti, ah well i guess if i fix it i shouldn't dwell on it too much.

 

Thanks for your help, your responses prompted to me to question several things i may have done wrong and i appreciate this is probably not a Corsair or H100i issue anymore.

 

One last question, i may buy 2 fresh fans for the new setup, I know you need static pressure when blowing through an obstical but if it's in push/pull should i have 2 static pressures? One pushing through with force and the other pulling through with force or should i have a static pressure pushing and an air flow fan pulling?

 

Thanks. :biggrin:

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You may need to give me an exact layout of your air flow in the case. The H100 on the front intake? What's on the roof? The H50? Just based on what I think you're running, the H50 is on one half of the roof (intake), the H100i is intake at the front, and a rear exhaust fan. It's possible you were just dumping too much heat onto the motherboard and your smell is one less than perfect solder heating up. If true, that would be a positive outcome.

 

Doesn't the 440 have a closed, non-ventilated front door? I've never worked with one, but that would seem to a be a substantial impediment to airflow. Nevertheless, a quick image search shows a lot of people with custom loops running a 240 rad in front, so perhaps I am missing something. I would recommend moving the H50 to rear exhaust port and running it as exhaust. You have a whole lot of room to play in your GPU temps, and if using internal air raises your gpu temps by 5 degrees, you are still 15-20C better than anyone using air. Even when water cooled, heat still radiates off the GPU and you have additional MB, VRM heat to dissipate as well. Since you can't do much about the intake, the better idea might be to optimize your exhaust situation. Putting the H50 on the rear and throwing in a coupe of low speed, quiet fans on the roof might help quite a bit.

 

Static pressure is cumulative. So if you have a push fan rated at 2.0mm and a pull at 2.0, it is equal to one fan with a pressure rating of 4.0mm of H20. If you add an airflow fan, you're just adding a smaller number to that equation. That said, you do not need to run push/pull on an H50. The rad just ins't thick enough for it to matter. I've been running H50's and H80i's for the last 4 years with about 30 different fan combinations, and the differences are usually marginal at anything less than extreme room temperatures. The noise difference is quite noticeable. I would run 1 decent static pressure fan as a push/exhaust in that rear slot. Also, since you have a window and have to look at all this, one fan is going to be a slimmer profile and not go deep into your case where it becomes an impediment. Keep in mind static pressure ratings are RPM dependent, so a fan with 3.0 rating at 2000 rpm is only better than a fan with a 1.5mm rating at 1000rpm, if you intend to run the fan at more than 1000. Static pressure curves aren't strictly linear and I am simplifying to make a point, but that is the best you can do without a q-curve of SP vs rpm.

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You may need to give me an exact layout of your air flow in the case. The H100 on the front intake? What's on the roof? The H50? Just based on what I think you're running, the H50 is on one half of the roof (intake), the H100i is intake at the front, and a rear exhaust fan. It's possible you were just dumping too much heat onto the motherboard and your smell is one less than perfect solder heating up. If true, that would be a positive outcome.

 

Doesn't the 440 have a closed, non-ventilated front door? I've never worked with one, but that would seem to a be a substantial impediment to airflow. Nevertheless, a quick image search shows a lot of people with custom loops running a 240 rad in front, so perhaps I am missing something. I would recommend moving the H50 to rear exhaust port and running it as exhaust. You have a whole lot of room to play in your GPU temps, and if using internal air raises your gpu temps by 5 degrees, you are still 15-20C better than anyone using air. Even when water cooled, heat still radiates off the GPU and you have additional MB, VRM heat to dissipate as well. Since you can't do much about the intake, the better idea might be to optimize your exhaust situation. Putting the H50 on the rear and throwing in a coupe of low speed, quiet fans on the roof might help quite a bit.

 

Static pressure is cumulative. So if you have a push fan rated at 2.0mm and a pull at 2.0, it is equal to one fan with a pressure rating of 4.0mm of H20. If you add an airflow fan, you're just adding a smaller number to that equation. That said, you do not need to run push/pull on an H50. The rad just ins't thick enough for it to matter. I've been running H50's and H80i's for the last 4 years with about 30 different fan combinations, and the differences are usually marginal at anything less than extreme room temperatures. The noise difference is quite noticeable. I would run 1 decent static pressure fan as a push/exhaust in that rear slot. Also, since you have a window and have to look at all this, one fan is going to be a slimmer profile and not go deep into your case where it becomes an impediment. Keep in mind static pressure ratings are RPM dependent, so a fan with 3.0 rating at 2000 rpm is only better than a fan with a 1.5mm rating at 1000rpm, if you intend to run the fan at more than 1000. Static pressure curves aren't strictly linear and I am simplifying to make a point, but that is the best you can do without a q-curve of SP vs rpm.

 

My setup prior to changing it last night that was causing me issues was the H100i 240mm rad in the roof as exhaust with 2x Corsair 120mm fans. The front has 3 Noctua Focused Flow PWM fans with the H55 rad connected to the bottom of these fans, with another NZXT case fan in pull on the other side. I then had a Corsair Quiet edition 140mm rear exhaust fan.

 

The H440 has 1 thin vent going down the right side of the front of the case panel, one vent in the roof panel which goes all the way round to the back, and the standard large exhaust vent on the back of the case itself.

 

Like i say, when i turned the fans on the H55 it didn't help a lot until i removed the front panel, i'm assuming because the small vent on the front wasn't enough to exhaust the air sufficiently? Something that shouldn't be a problem if i move it to the rear.

 

I've no idea why other people aren't experiencing these issues, maybe most of the people with 240's in the front are cooling the cpu which doesn't produce as much heat so its not noticeable, although it still begs the question...why was my case getting so hot when i had the stock cooler on my 780ti? Most people won't have water cooling on there GPU and they aren't complaining. Maybe it's a combination of the heat from the GPU going through the H100i and causing excessive heat, maybe it's the plastic on the case, really don't know.

 

I will try running it in just Pull to compare temps and if i don't need to go push/pull i won't. I'll bare that information in mind when i go fan shopping ;):

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As a side note, does the bracket you're using on the 780 cool the VRMs or VRAM in any way?

 

Yes i believe it does, it's an MSI Twin Frozer 780ti which has a plate over the VRMs. I checked before i bought the bracket that i wouldn't need heatsinks.

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I agree, whether the air flow is ideal or not, it's hard to imagine your case temps getting hot enough to cause this. I also don't think your original set-up is fatally flawed that it would lead to this.

 

If you really are smelling smoke (or something like it), there is only one thing capable of producing the energy and temperature necessary for a phase change --- electricity. That leads us back to the boards and power supply. Do you have any monitoring program to give you motherboard or VRM temps? HWiNFO?

 

Also, I am going to rescind my recommendation to move the H50 to the rear exhaust slot for the time being. I thought you had it in the roof right above as intake. The front slot should be doable and it certainly looks like other people are using rads up there. Having the ability to use the rear slot as a free intake or exhaust may prove useful later, particularly if the front panel is dense.

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I agree, whether the air flow is ideal or not, it's hard to imagine your case temps getting hot enough to cause this. I also don't think your original set-up is fatally flawed that it would lead to this.

 

If you really are smelling smoke (or something like it), there is only one thing capable of producing the energy and temperature necessary for a phase change --- electricity. That leads us back to the boards and power supply. Do you have any monitoring program to give you motherboard or VRM temps? HWiNFO?

 

Also, I am going to rescind my recommendation to move the H50 to the rear exhaust slot for the time being. I thought you had it in the roof right above as intake. The front slot should be doable and it certainly looks like other people are using rads up there. Having the ability to use the rear slot as a free intake or exhaust may prove useful later, particularly if the front panel is dense.

 

The thing is though, I have to put it in the rear, it’s the only way to exhaust the air sufficiently without permanently removing the front case panel.

 

I have checked my temps using HWiNFO and I don’t think it had a listing for VRMs but I remember my temps seeming fine, the highest temp was the CPU I think, nothing looked out of the ordinary.

 

The Power Supply is a EVGA SuperNova 850watt which I’m lead to believe is a very good one, I remember thinking I had put it in the wrong way round when I built the computer because all the writing on it was upside down, but this was to allow the vent on the PSU to exhaust out of the fan at the bottom, and it doesn’t even feel warm when I game.

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Every time I've experienced this "smell" you speak of , it has been PSU related. I agree with c attack here.. After countless builds and repairs I can tell you your temps would NOT produce this odor unless you had a "choke" or a faulty piece of hardware. so, let me ask you this: If your PSU is mounted "fan down" did you happen to REMOVE the four standoff case legs of your NZXT? Do you have your PC sitting on a thick carpet? Sounds like a "choked" PSU causing your detected odor. fire up your system, game for a few minutes, remove the side panel and stick your face/nose to your power supply...does it stink?

 

You can use the evga thermal control software to set your PSU fan speed. After checking the aforementioned things and ensuring you have an ample space between your case bottom and wherever it's sitting, I'd fire up the fan to 50% and check to see if the smell comes back...

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Every time I've experienced this "smell" you speak of , it has been PSU related. I agree with c attack here.. After countless builds and repairs I can tell you your temps would NOT produce this odor unless you had a "choke" or a faulty piece of hardware. so, let me ask you this: If your PSU is mounted "fan down" did you happen to REMOVE the four standoff case legs of your NZXT? Do you have your PC sitting on a thick carpet? Sounds like a "choked" PSU causing your detected odor. fire up your system, game for a few minutes, remove the side panel and stick your face/nose to your power supply...does it stink?

 

You can use the evga thermal control software to set your PSU fan speed. After checking the aforementioned things and ensuring you have an ample space between your case bottom and wherever it's sitting, I'd fire up the fan to 50% and check to see if the smell comes back...

 

Thanks for the suggestion, I haven’t removed the legs on the case and it’s on a wooden computer table, so there is plenty of clearance. I have stuck my hand underneath the case as close to the PSU as possible when the smell occurred and there was zero heat coming out of it.

 

I have removed my top panel of the case and put my hand in the case and the whole thing felt warm, there wasn’t really one spot where it was coming from, although the H55 rad did feel hotter, which is to be expected I guess. Would a heat smell not occur if the heat wasn’t leaving the case? And possibly heating up the plastic material on the case.

 

I will have another check of the PSU just to be sure but like I said in my above posts, when I setup the H55 exhausting out of the front with the panels off the smell completely vanished, it has to be in issue with heat not getting out of the case effectively, tonight I’ll test the PSU then attempt to mount the H55 at the rear with the front panel on, hopefully either of those will produce the results I’m after.

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The thing is though, I have to put it in the rear, it’s the only way to exhaust the air sufficiently without permanently removing the front case panel.

 

That's OK. I was more focused on the trouble shooting. There is nothing wrog with putting it in the rear exhaust slot.

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