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TX850 underloaded?


Mr. Just a Guy

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Hello. I just bought this new PSU to replace my cheap and aging (and probably dying and potentially hazardous) old PSU. I've been meaning to upgrade and saw a good deal on the TX850 so I went ahead and bought it before I had enough money to actually upgrade my entire PC. :P

 

I'm dealing with two little problems, though. First of all, as you can see in my profile, I'm on a really low end and old PC and I was running it "just fine" on a value 400w@16A PSU, so the TX850 is way overkill for my current rig, so, the first problem is I have no way to tell if my PSU fan works.

 

The TX850's fan only starts spinning after the PSU gets to a certain temperature, and making my computer work at full load isn't hard at all, I just load any modern game and it goes into full load according to the software I'm using, but the PSU fan still doesn't start up. The PSU feels warm at touch at full load, not hot, but warm enough to be noticeable. My PC may be low end, but the Pentium 4 Prescott isn't exactly known to be power efficient, so the possibility that the fan may not work and I have no way to test it worries me a little.

 

The second problem is, I'm noticing some haziness on my monitor's image with this new PSU, so there's probably some ripple effect going on in the PSU's voltage. I'm wondering if this could be caused by a much lower load than the PSU is rated for? :sigh!: I was powering this PC with less than half the power this PSU provides.

 

What do you guys think? Are these issues to be expected from a PSU that is overkill for my system or is it faulty and I should just RMA it?

 

Thanks.

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I cant see how with the PSU being too much as it will still deliver small loads regardless of the low demand amount.,and its quite likely you will never have the fan come on with such a low demand .

These new generation PSU's can run 24/7 and still not build up alot of heat like the older ones would unless it were really taxed...

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I connected my monitor to a different outlet and that seems to fix the problem. Weird. Grounding problem maybe? It's probably a problem with my electrical installation, but it is weird that the cheap and old PSU this is replacing has no problem with it. I'll have an electrician take a look at my installation. Anyway, problem solved I guess?
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hmm,do you live in a old house?

reason I ask is the outlet may not have a good grounding system,im far from an electrician but I was gonna install a wireless system in my basement and found I have a grounding issue.

Could also be this new PSU being stronger pushed the outlets capacity.

and yes,just guesses on my part...;):

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It's a reasonably recent building (up since the early 80s), though this isn't the first time I'm faced with grounding issues with the installation. Though, as I said, I do find it weird that the cheap and old PSU I was using never had any issues of this kind. But oh well.

 

Also, I just saw the fan spin for a few minutes while leaving a game idle for a few hours, so I guess that works too, no problems with the unit then.

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  • Corsair Employees

Ground problem, yes.

 

As for the PSU fan: Just because the CPU is at 100% load doesn't mean your pushing that PSU anywhere near that. You'd need two graphics cards to even get that PSU to 50% load or higher, so I seriously doubt that fan would turn on unless it was 40°C in your room.

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