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h80i with fan set to air intake


fifo

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hi,

 

I have the X-Dreamer4 case and I can't fit the h100i so have decided to install the h80i on the rear exhaust fan grill. now i have read that its recommend to have the h80i fan set to intake thus taking air into the case rather than exhaust. so if I mount the h80i on the rear exhaust fan grill but have the fan set as intake, so air will be drawn in from the rear into the h80i radiator than out from the top two 12 cm fans, would this work and keep temperatures cool or should have the h80i fan set to exhaust and follow convention (ie front - intake, rear - exhaust)?

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You can try both ways, but the GPU often ends up being the wild card in the set-up. If you have your case with it's back close to a wall (as one usually does with a tower) and your reference design graphics card is blowing hot air out the back just underneath the 120mm intake, a lot of that hot air is going to get sucked back into the case. In my experimentation with a similar case set-up, it got very nice CPU-only test numbers. Then when it came for real world use, my internal case temps go up by 10-15C, everything got warm, and CPU/GPU/Ambient were all worse than the rear as exhaust.

 

Definitely experiment. But unless you only use your computer for CPU only tasks, I suspect it will come out worse as intake.

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thanks for the response guys,

 

the graphics card i have is the evga Titan black which sits towards the middle/bottom quarter of the case, so its not directly beneath it, i suppose there is probably about 10 to 15 cm vertical height between the exhaust grill and the graphics grill. The graphics card is one of those that uses passive cooling hence it has a turbine like fan (i think) at one end of the card, i suppose this sucks air in and pushes it through the card and out the back unlike some cards that use the conventional active cooling which has the normal fan in the middle of the card blowing air at the components where some of the hot air is expelled in the case. So with the setup i have and the type of graphics card am i better of having the radiator fan as exhaust? There are two fans (push/pull).

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thanks for the response guys,

 

the graphics card i have is the evga Titan black which sits towards the middle/bottom quarter of the case, so its not directly beneath it, i suppose there is probably about 10 to 15 cm vertical height between the exhaust grill and the graphics grill. The graphics card is one of those that uses passive cooling hence it has a turbine like fan (i think) at one end of the card, i suppose this sucks air in and pushes it through the card and out the back unlike some cards that use the conventional active cooling which has the normal fan in the middle of the card blowing air at the components where some of the hot air is expelled in the case. So with the setup i have and the type of graphics card am i better of having the radiator fan as exhaust? There are two fans (push/pull).

 

Oh... well if temperature is that important to you, I have a nice, shiny red AMD 5770 in the closet that will run at much lower temperatures than your Titan. We can swap. In fact, it has a sister. 2 for 1. Deal? No?

 

The Titan Black is a "reference" design GPU case. It sucks air from underneath through that radial fan, then blows it out the back like a hairdryer. The air coming out the back will be quite warm. You will also get some heat bleed from GPU rising straight up inside the case. There is nothing you can do about this other than water cool the GPU, and that isn't necessary. One of the benefits of using the 120mm slot as exhaust is it pushes that warmer air right above the GPU out of the case. Then both GPU and exhaust air can climb the wall outside and away from you and your rig. If you are using it as intake, than it gets blown across the MB before the top exhaust fans push it out (assuming you have top exhaust fans). If you don't have a good supply of fresh air coming from the front of the case, the ambient temps in the case tend to rise and then the GPU gets even hotter and the cycle goes on. I am going to assume this set-up is for gaming, and not encrypting files all day long. Your GPU is always going to be the hottest element in your case and it should be your cooling priority. Even in the most ill programmed, congested MMO's, your GPU temps will be far closer to their limit temps than your CPU.

 

If you can easily flip your fan around, there is no reason not to try. You won't hurt anything. But if you have your PC in tight space, back against the wall, I would recommend you keep it as exhaust.

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thanks for the info, the reason why I got the titan black superclocked edition cause it has almost 100 % top reviews and you don't need a second card and for future proofing as it supports 4k.

 

As far as air intake is concerned I have a 12 cm fan in the front and the X-Dreamer4 comes with a large 20 cm blue led fan on the side panel blowing air in to the case, and I have two 12 fans at the top exhausting air out if I also make the rear an exhaust with the radiator that makes 3 12 cm fans exhausting air out. I have an axi 760 at the bottom of the case but the fan on that don't run till you draw more than 150 watt. so you think this would be enough to keep the system cool?

I also want it to be quiet well.

 

I am going to use the machine for video encoding and some occasional games. I want it to cope with the heat from the graphics card, because my last system had the 460 gtx which was fine during normal use temps were ok, but as soon as you load a game temps quickly started rising. that system had two 8 cm fans as exhaust and one 12 cm fan as intake, the 460 gtx also had the fan in the middle meaning it blows a good portion of the air inside the case. this one reason why I prefer the radial fan of the titan as it blows most of the hot air out. I guess the radial fan may be noisy though, I don't know, anybody got experience with these type of fans on graphics cards.

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It's not necessarily the amount of air you're intaking and exhausting, but where the intakes are coming from and where the exhausts are also matters. Most, if not all cases are designed to intake from the bottom, side, and front of the case, while exhausting from the rear and the top. This way cool air can come in without fear of sucking in any of the old hot air that has been expelled. The configuration of the fans shouldn't really change the noise profile. You can try different setups. IIRC, my best performance in my old HAF 932 case was with negative pressure. To achieve that I had my more powerful fans running as exhausts with less powerful and fewer fans running as intakes. Some people prefer positive pressure as a way to keep dust out. You should experiment to see what works for you, but honestly, using the H80i in the rear of your case means you should probably be using it as an exhaust to get the best performance.
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I couldn't see the 200cm side fan in my quick image search for your case. Sounds like you have plenty of quiet intake options and the H80 should be an exhaust. If your CPU temps start getting too high, then it might merit further exploration. No need to explain your choice of video cards. We're all just jealous.
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thanks guys,

 

I also have the option of fitting an additional 12 cm fan at the bottom of the case which I am hoping I wouldn't need as I have a 12 cm front and 20 cm side which should hopefully be enough. I don't like having too many fans as they all add to tge noise. so I think I am going to see how the performance is with front 12cm and side 20cm as intake and h80i push/pull on rear exhaust with two 12cm fans as exhaust. if this is enough to keep the system reasonably cool around 35 c system temp then I shan't bother with an additional bottom intake fan.

just hope the radial fan on the gpu is quiet.

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Wotcher. I have an H80i as a top rear intake with GPU at mid case rear exhaust, but I have plenty of space behind my PC (many metres). With such space, I'm reading this thread as a recommendation confirming my choices? Would that be correct? I use two airflow 140 fans to draw air out of the top of my case, chimney style, and front intake fans (140 at centre to cover GPU, 120 for HDDs). I don't want the H80i using a top vent for reasons unnecessary to detail here. Case temps seem stable at ~30°. Any issues with this setup?
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I'll assume 30C is at idle and that's perfectly fine. Huge range of acceptable idle temps between 20-40C. Hardly matters. The load temps are the ones to take a look at. But if you haven't already noticed problems, you likely are fine.

 

Since you are away from the wall, a lot of that hot GPU exhaust may find its way elsewhere. You can also help it along by making some sort of shield to keep in from floating right back in the rad intake. Piece of plastic, shoebox with ends cut out, Legos, whatever... just some thing to tunnel the exhaust away from the intake. Again, if you are comfortable with your load temps as they are, then there may not be a need.

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CPU temps, which you can measure with your BIOS, RealTemp, HWiNFO or any of the other common monitoring programs -- including on occasion the Corsair Link program. The case, ambient, and motherboard temps do matter as well, but the rad is working on the CPU block. Technically, your max temp is for your chip is in the neighborhood of 100C, but you don't want to be near that. I like worst case scenarios to keep it under 80 and low 70's max is all I'm willing to tolerate in normal situations. Certainly room for debate there.

 

That said, in this theoretical discussion about sucking hot air back through the intake, the MB would also be affected. I am not sure what everyone will agree is too hot for the MB. I would be a little concerned about sustained temps over 60C, more in terms of component longevity than imminent danger.

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Honestly? You got a blower on the graphic card. It would be better to exhaust considering there's nothing really heating the inside. I don't know if you have dust filters on that case but using the rad as intake will surly clog the rad with dust and require attention more often than not. I put my H100i as exhaust so all air is passed through filter before going through Rad, also it just wouldn't make sense blowing hot air down into the case. I barley have any dust build up after a year in service. Unless you want to use the rad as a dust filter :)
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