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The 24pin cable of AX1200i


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24p-20nc is not used, so this is normal, my 1200i and 750i are the same, so don't worry, you have the right cable, just connect it to your mobo and have fun with this excellent psu. pin 20 is from the time of the 20 pin cable and this pin was in those days a -5 volt.
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The problem is that my Z87X-UD4H Motherboard uses pin 20 for the -5V.

 

PS: on the box of the PSU there is a pic with the 24pin cable, and in that picture, all 24pins appear.

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The problem is that my Z87X-UD4H Motherboard uses pin 20 for the -5V.

 

PS: on the box of the PSU there is a pic with the 24pin cable, and in that picture, all 24pins appear.

 

Actually, your Z87X-UD4H does NOT use the -5V.

 

Just like Ahtlon said... pin 20 isn't used. The -5V was removed from the ATX12V standard a number of years ago (2007, maybe?). 99% of the PSUs out there today, never mind Corsair PSUs, are missing that pin.

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Actually, your Z87X-UD4H does NOT use the -5V.

 

Just like Ahtlon said... pin 20 isn't used. The -5V was removed from the ATX12V standard a number of years ago (2007, maybe?). 99% of the PSUs out there today, never mind Corsair PSUs, are missing that pin.

 

Page 25: http://download.gigabyte.eu/FileList/Manual/mb_manual_ga-z87x-ud4h_e.pdf

 

It appears it does.

 

Should I disconsider the Manual ?

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You don't need the -5 volt, I assume it's a old drawing because almost every drawing of this 24 pin is the same at gigabyte, take a look here on page 25 of there Z97 mobo.

http://download.gigabyte.eu/FileList/Manual/mb_manual_ga-z97x-ud5h_e.pdf.

 

My motherboard, on the 24 pins slot, has all the 24 pins, as pictured in the manual here, at page 25: http://download.gigabyte.eu/FileList/Manual/mb_manual_ga-z87x-ud4h_e.pdf

 

That is not an old drawing.

 

I belive this is because it has a PS/2 port and uses a Super I/O chip that is made by iTE.

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My RIIIE also has a ps/2 port, so, you can put the 24pin cable of the psu on your mobo and it will work, just took a look at the pin layout of my mobo and yes al 24 pins are occupied to, so don't worry, just plug it in and be done with it. You are to much worried.Photo is from the web.

dsc000053182294.thumb.jpg.cdb9f5d401718f9640010ff0a7f13065.jpg

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I belive this is because it has a PS/2 port and uses a Super I/O chip that is made by iTE.

 

It's not because of the PS/2 port. Motherboards came with a PS/2 port long after the ATX spec was changed. Please re-read my quote. The -5V was for the ISA bus.

 

If you don't believe us, talk to Gigabyte support.

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Is this correct: "ISA isn't actually dead though, it exists in the form of the LPC bus that connects the SuperIO chip to the chipset" ?!

 

Technobeard, please tell me if I can go ahead and use the cable without any potential damage or without diminishing performance of my system, and I will go right ahead and use it :)

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Yep, most of the mainboards have still the 20 pin occupied, why I don't know, You can safely attach the 24 pin psu cable to your mainboard, nothing will happen, it's save, You are a little bit to much worried. I can understand that, it's not a cheap psu, so you want to be complete save before you connect it.
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The 24-pin on the motherboard has 24-pins because that's how they come from Foxconn, Molex, Amphenol, etc. whoever they buy their connectors from.

 

It doesn't need to be said again: Neither your board, nor any other board made in the last DECADE requires the -5V.

 

Last time I saw a motherboard that used a -5V was an MSI made back in 1999 that used it for the on-board sound amp circuit.

 

You can contact Gigabyte, or you can just put your PC together and say "oh.. look. It works!" and be done with it. ;):

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Thanks Ahtlon :)

 

It doesn't need to be said again: Your board, or any other board made in the last DECADE requires the -5V.

 

So it is in fact needed? :confused:

 

From what I understand, the LPC bus (that replaced the ISA), uses the Super I/O chip, witch in turn requires the damn -5V (the 20th pin).

 

Yet, if an employee of Corsair tells me I can go ahead and use the provided 24 pin cable with the AX1200i(that has no -5V), without any potential damage and without any diminished performance, I will rest at peace :)

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Yep, isa is from the time of the pentium and isa slots. Just don't worry mate, just use it, your are not the only one that has this mobo and a corsair psu. Like I said, you worry to much. Just use it, it's ok
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So it is in fact needed? :confused:

 

Oops. Typo. Just trying to confuse you. ;):

 

The Super I/O chip ITE IT8728F is for monitoring the voltages and the temperature and like I understand it doesn't use a -5 volt line.

It uses +3.3volt.

 

Correct. The IC will attempt to monitor every possible voltage. That still doesn't mean the voltage is required.

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