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Is it SMBUS? Controling from other devices.


bondus

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The corsair link connection on the PSU is called "SMBUS" in the manual.

This makes me think it is a normal standardized i2c/smbus communication link.

 

It must be possible to connect to it using other hardware (such as a embedded board like a rasp pi).

 

Has anyone figured out how to do this? What is the pinout? What voltage is used?

 

With a modern i2c capable scope it should be easy to figure this out.

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  • 2 weeks later...

it seems as though it might be, they say in the manual its pmbus. Usually boards have 5 pins, but there is always a NC (no connection pin) so maybe it is minus the NC pin.....

 

however I just tried to connect it to my buspirate (i2c/uart/etc) host, have tried even setting it to 400khz in I2C mode and have had no luck handshaking with it, I want to believe its possible that it might be a UART, since several other models claim to have a "serial" port.

 

When I purchased this power supply, I thought that was what I was getting--a UART. I was wrong and furious and didn't want to screw with sending it back. I then realized I couldn't connect it to my motherboard and had to use the stupid USB adapter... got over that then plugged it in and realized it doesn't work on linux....

 

So I attached the USB device to a Windows VM... no big deal I could control the fans and actually turn them on at least which was nice...Would be super nice if they could be managed by the thermal chip that the rest of my 4pin PWM fans are managed by, but oh well.

 

So then, the cable broke when I was adding a hard drive cable, now the fan never turns on, and I can't seem to figure out the correct way to connect it to my motherboard, since I can't figure out what pins are data, clock, and 3.3V (they're all +3.3v except the clock and the ground... so obviously I've tried different combinations, with no luck.

 

I'm really starting to lose my patience. I used to own a pair of Sennheiser HD380 pro headphones. The cable broke, and after 10 tries of attempting to solder a new connector, I was unsuccessful and left with no choice but to pay the $30 dollars for a cable for my headphones. Instead, I poured half a bottle of liquid solder flux all over them and set them on fire. I was going to send them back to sennheiser that way, but I just decided I didn't care and bought a pair of Marshals a year later (used some cheap headphones in between.)

 

I don't really feel like I need to go there though. Instead I'm going to make such a huge deal about this instead. Suffice to say, I am not your average "bling bling lil wayne gangster wannabe overclockin my **** yo" computer user and I suspect I can cause a great deal of trouble. I don't like being ripped off, but it's too common and it always boils down to "what else are you gonna do except bend over and take it?"

 

No, actually the consequences of harrassing a large corporation like corsair to the tune of a higher cost that what I paid for this power supply is the least of my worries.

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