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Old 01-25-2019, 04:41 AM
Belieal Belieal is offline
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Default i7-6700k running at 100c during load after cleaning H115i Pro

Hi everyone,

My PC is from February 2016 and I recently cleaned it for the first time, as I was beginning to see the temperatures rise on my CPU to about 70 c under load. I cleaned my watercooler radiator (Corsair H115i Pro) and after booting up and stress-testing, I immediately saw a sharp increase in temperature to about 80 c under load. I first thought that I had turned the fans the wrong way around, so I reversed them. I now saw an increase to 90-100c under load. I put them back to the original position but I still see the same 90-100 c temperatures along with idling at 60-70c.

The temperatures are very spirratic so I had first come to the conclusion that it would be a connection issue between the heatsink and the CPU, so I reseated it along with reapplying thermal paste. This did not help.

All components are stock speeds.



This is speccy showing the temperatures of my CPU watching a 1080p 60 fps video on YouTube. The first large spike in the middle is me opening the video.



And this is closing that video, along with about 3 minutes of idle. I closed the video at around the middle of the graph.

Any help would be greatly appreciated! :)
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  #2  
Old 01-25-2019, 09:11 AM
c-attack c-attack is offline
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Are you sure you have a H115i Pro and the prior model H115i?

On the later model this is sometimes reported after taking the down the cooler for cleaning or any kind of move that jostles the radiator. The most probable theory is untended debris has formed inside the cooler and once shaken up a bit, has now found its way to into a more vulnerable area like the pump strainer. It is also possible it is more ordinary air bubbles, but usually this comes with a definite change in pump sound and most users note it. For bubbles, you can tilt the case back and forth, toggle the pump speed from low to high to low to high and try and push them out. For the blockage problem, options are more limited.

Look in Link/iCUE and find the H115i Temp under the cooler device panel. Normally this temperature ranges from 20-40C depending on load and room/case temp. If you have a decent blockage, it is going to be much higher even at the desktop -- typically 40-50C without load and slowly climbing. This bit of information is key to convincing someone the problem is the cooler, rather than any of the other things that can go wrong. You can try another roll of the dice and take the cooler down and shake it yourself, hopeful the debris will settle elsewhere. This is pretty much down to random luck, so not a real solution, but it might buy you a little more time. Ultimately, the cooler will need to be replaced and this is something covered by the warranty.
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Old 01-25-2019, 09:35 AM
Belieal Belieal is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by c-attack View Post
Are you sure you have a H115i Pro and the prior model H115i?

On the later model this is sometimes reported after taking the down the cooler for cleaning or any kind of move that jostles the radiator. The most probable theory is untended debris has formed inside the cooler and once shaken up a bit, has now found its way to into a more vulnerable area like the pump strainer. It is also possible it is more ordinary air bubbles, but usually this comes with a definite change in pump sound and most users note it. For bubbles, you can tilt the case back and forth, toggle the pump speed from low to high to low to high and try and push them out. For the blockage problem, options are more limited.

Look in Link/iCUE and find the H115i Temp under the cooler device panel. Normally this temperature ranges from 20-40C depending on load and room/case temp. If you have a decent blockage, it is going to be much higher even at the desktop -- typically 40-50C without load and slowly climbing. This bit of information is key to convincing someone the problem is the cooler, rather than any of the other things that can go wrong. You can try another roll of the dice and take the cooler down and shake it yourself, hopeful the debris will settle elsewhere. This is pretty much down to random luck, so not a real solution, but it might buy you a little more time. Ultimately, the cooler will need to be replaced and this is something covered by the warranty.
Thank you for your reply!

You are correct, I do in fact have the H115i and not the Pro version.
Your suggestion that it might be a blockage could bear fruit. I have noticed a slight sound right when I start my PC. I assumed it was a fan hitting a plastic label or something, but I'll have to test it out when I get home.

iCUE also shows a temperature of about 38c to 45-48c, climbing slowly during load.

Thank you once again. I'll get back to you once I've tried shaking the cooler a bit.
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Old 01-25-2019, 09:44 AM
c-attack c-attack is offline
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Bubbles are usually static-like in sound, most often intermittent or inconsistent. A constant drone or repetitive metered sound is usually something else. If there is a blockage, it is not uncommon for you hear some more "pump hum". Typically this is the increase in back pressure from the obstruction.

Your coolant temp is too high, but not yet catastrophic. If you do have a blockage, it should climb on the desktop as well and have difficulty shedding its heat. You warm it up to 44C and it seemingly stays there forever. A working cooler will drops load coolant temps at about 1C per minute after the load ceases. Also, depending on where the blockage is located, some users note strong differences in "temperature feel" between the two hoses. Normally, you can only drop 1-2C on a pass through the radiator, so tube temp feel is indistinguishable between outflow and the return. If you have a blockage at the pump, heat may creep up from both directions or one hose may be cold and the other hot. Both are signs of a problem. Also, when your coolant temp is 40C, then the radiator exhaust should be 40C as well. The hot coolant, cold exhaust feel is a dead giveaway and definitely something to include in a support ticket. I can think of reasons why your coolant can naturally get to 38C, but not if the exhaust coming out is 22C and cool.
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Old 01-25-2019, 11:26 AM
Belieal Belieal is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by c-attack View Post
Bubbles are usually static-like in sound, most often intermittent or inconsistent. A constant drone or repetitive metered sound is usually something else. If there is a blockage, it is not uncommon for you hear some more "pump hum". Typically this is the increase in back pressure from the obstruction.

Your coolant temp is too high, but not yet catastrophic. If you do have a blockage, it should climb on the desktop as well and have difficulty shedding its heat. You warm it up to 44C and it seemingly stays there forever. A working cooler will drops load coolant temps at about 1C per minute after the load ceases. Also, depending on where the blockage is located, some users note strong differences in "temperature feel" between the two hoses. Normally, you can only drop 1-2C on a pass through the radiator, so tube temp feel is indistinguishable between outflow and the return. If you have a blockage at the pump, heat may creep up from both directions or one hose may be cold and the other hot. Both are signs of a problem. Also, when your coolant temp is 40C, then the radiator exhaust should be 40C as well. The hot coolant, cold exhaust feel is a dead giveaway and definitely something to include in a support ticket. I can think of reasons why your coolant can naturally get to 38C, but not if the exhaust coming out is 22C and cool.
Thank you for the reply.

I have now tried to shake the radiator and pump to no avail. My CPU temperatures are still in the high 90s.
You mention differences in temperatures between hoses and that is something I can definitely feel. The exhaust air from the fans feel very cool as well. In fact, my whole room temperature has dropped due to the fans running at 100% .

Anyway, it seems the cooler has a 5 year warranty, so I guess I'll have it replaced.

Thank you very much for your help and I hope you have a great day! :)
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cooler, cpu high temp, i7-6700k, issue h115i

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