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  #1  
Old 11-05-2019, 12:13 PM
huynq1992 huynq1992 is offline
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Default Please help me answer the question about corsair h150i pro

last week I bought a corsair h150i pro water cooler. I also know that this aio water cooler has 3 quiet, balanced and extreme performance.
So if I turn on the extreme mode all day, will it reduce the fan life or have other problems?
And if the CPU is too hot (my CPU is amd Ryzen 3900), will the water cooler leak out the water?
Please help me. Thank you so much
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  #2  
Old 11-05-2019, 12:29 PM
c-attack c-attack is online now
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Typically Mean Time Before Failure of fan is measured in hours of use, rather than revolutions. I suppose common sense is a fan that turns 10,000,0000 revolutions is more likely to have a bearing issue than one that has only turned 1,000,000, but this seems like a pointless analysis for an inexpensive and replaceable part. Use the fans how you need to. They don't need to be replaced annually.

Fans will only reduce the coolant temperature (H150i temp), so don't feel like you need to blast them when the CPU temp is warm. That's not how it works. CPU transmits heat through the cold plate into the cooler. That is your cooling -- conducting heat away. The cooler is the heat transportation system. It takes the waste heat dumped into the water and moves it somewhere else for dispersal. That is your coolant temp. However, if you don't get rid of the heat in the coolant, it will transmit back to the CPU. This is what separates one cooler from another. Fan and pump speeds will only affect the heat dispersal process. They will not change the rate of conductivity between the CPU and cold plate. That part is fixed and your CPU temp is going to be largely based on voltage.

No, the CPU will not get so hot as to melt the metal block and cause liquid to run out. Your CPU will shutdown for thermal protection long before you get to the limits of the materials of the cooler.
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  #3  
Old 11-05-2019, 01:22 PM
huynq1992 huynq1992 is offline
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Thank you very much. I already understand how it works
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  #4  
Old 11-05-2019, 09:45 PM
huynq1992 huynq1992 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by c-attack View Post
Typically Mean Time Before Failure of fan is measured in hours of use, rather than revolutions. I suppose common sense is a fan that turns 10,000,0000 revolutions is more likely to have a bearing issue than one that has only turned 1,000,000, but this seems like a pointless analysis for an inexpensive and replaceable part. Use the fans how you need to. They don't need to be replaced annually.

Fans will only reduce the coolant temperature (H150i temp), so don't feel like you need to blast them when the CPU temp is warm. That's not how it works. CPU transmits heat through the cold plate into the cooler. That is your cooling -- conducting heat away. The cooler is the heat transportation system. It takes the waste heat dumped into the water and moves it somewhere else for dispersal. That is your coolant temp. However, if you don't get rid of the heat in the coolant, it will transmit back to the CPU. This is what separates one cooler from another. Fan and pump speeds will only affect the heat dispersal process. They will not change the rate of conductivity between the CPU and cold plate. That part is fixed and your CPU temp is going to be largely based on voltage.

No, the CPU will not get so hot as to melt the metal block and cause liquid to run out. Your CPU will shutdown for thermal protection long before you get to the limits of the materials of the cooler.
Can you answer for me if I set it to extreme mode, will the pump life be reduced? Thank you so much
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  #5  
Old 11-06-2019, 10:06 AM
c-attack c-attack is online now
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Same premise as the fans. MTBF is hours, not revolutions. I suggest you test coolant temperature differences between Balanced and Extreme pump mode once you are up and running. Most users do not report a temp difference between those two modes and flow speed is not usually an issue on short length AIO coolers with low to moderate restriction. The same cannot be said for the Quiet mode. It is a much lower speed and meant for the lowest possible noise level while working on the desktop. It will offer a temp penalty in return when under sustained load.

Last edited by c-attack; 11-06-2019 at 11:52 AM.
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  #6  
Old 11-06-2019, 11:05 AM
huynq1992 huynq1992 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by c-attack View Post
Same premise as the fans. MTBF is hours, not revolutions. I suggest you test coolant temperature differences between Balanced and Extreme once you are up and running. Most users do not report a temp difference between those two modes and flow speed is not usually an issue on short length AIO coolers with low to moderate restriction. The same cannot be said for the Quiet mode. It is a much lower speed and meant for the lowest possible noise level while working on the desktop. It will offer a temp penalty in return when under sustained load.
Thank you so much. I have test. Extreme mode temperature is 3 C lower than balanced mode temperature when CPU running at 100% full load.
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  #7  
Old 11-08-2019, 05:25 AM
huynq1992 huynq1992 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by c-attack View Post
Typically Mean Time Before Failure of fan is measured in hours of use, rather than revolutions. I suppose common sense is a fan that turns 10,000,0000 revolutions is more likely to have a bearing issue than one that has only turned 1,000,000, but this seems like a pointless analysis for an inexpensive and replaceable part. Use the fans how you need to. They don't need to be replaced annually.

Fans will only reduce the coolant temperature (H150i temp), so don't feel like you need to blast them when the CPU temp is warm. That's not how it works. CPU transmits heat through the cold plate into the cooler. That is your cooling -- conducting heat away. The cooler is the heat transportation system. It takes the waste heat dumped into the water and moves it somewhere else for dispersal. That is your coolant temp. However, if you don't get rid of the heat in the coolant, it will transmit back to the CPU. This is what separates one cooler from another. Fan and pump speeds will only affect the heat dispersal process. They will not change the rate of conductivity between the CPU and cold plate. That part is fixed and your CPU temp is going to be largely based on voltage.

No, the CPU will not get so hot as to melt the metal block and cause liquid to run out. Your CPU will shutdown for thermal protection long before you get to the limits of the materials of the cooler.
Can you help me answer this question
When I render with adobe after effect, my cpu is always at 100% full load in about 60 minutes and the temperature is at 79 ~ 84 degrees C. And the long render time will cause the water temperature in the water cooler to increase.
So if the water temperature is too high, does water cooling leak water at the joints? And what is the safe water temperature in water radiator?
Thank you so much
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  #8  
Old 11-08-2019, 07:00 AM
c-attack c-attack is online now
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Most rubber tube products have a temperature threshold of between 115C-180C depending on type, density, construction, etc. However, since coolant temperature is the baseline or minimum possible CPU and most CPUs have a CPU temp to coolant differential of +30-50C when fully loaded, you will reach your TJ Max and the CPU will initiate a safety shutdown when the coolant is in the 50-60C range and the processor is tickling 100C. Since the CPU has the lowest temp limit of anything involved, it will prevent you from reaching the limits.

40C is a fairly common coolant temp for extended professional loads or almost anyone in a warm climate during certain parts of the year. The fan presets do max out at 40C, but that does not represent a critical level for the cooler. The fan curves are based on a 20-23C room temp and +17C over ambient usually represents a large and extended load. Regardless a 40C water baseline will put most people up near the 80-90C cpu mark and that is where single degrees might matter and the fans attempt to prevent and further temperature increases.
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  #9  
Old 11-08-2019, 07:17 AM
huynq1992 huynq1992 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by c-attack View Post
Most rubber tube products have a temperature threshold of between 115C-180C depending on type, density, construction, etc. However, since coolant temperature is the baseline or minimum possible CPU and most CPUs have a CPU temp to coolant differential of +30-50C when fully loaded, you will reach your TJ Max and the CPU will initiate a safety shutdown when the coolant is in the 50-60C range and the processor is tickling 100C. Since the CPU has the lowest temp limit of anything involved, it will prevent you from reaching the limits.

40C is a fairly common coolant temp for extended professional loads or almost anyone in a warm climate during certain parts of the year. The fan presets do max out at 40C, but that does not represent a critical level for the cooler. The fan curves are based on a 20-23C room temp and +17C over ambient usually represents a large and extended load. Regardless a 40C water baseline will put most people up near the 80-90C cpu mark and that is where single degrees might matter and the fans attempt to prevent and further temperature increases.
Thank you very much. So you mean I can continue rendering without worrying about it. Because if the cpu temperature or coolant is too hot, it will automatically shut down before the cpu or water cooling fan has a problem.
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  #10  
Old 11-08-2019, 07:27 AM
c-attack c-attack is online now
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There isn’t a coolant temperature shutdown point (unless you program one into iCUE), but the CPU is the item you want to protect and the BIOS will take of that if you hit critical levels. Anyone in a tropical climate sits at 40C all year long and it is a common level for rendering. There shouldn’t be any wear issues for the cooler materials at 40C vs 30C.
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  #11  
Old 11-08-2019, 07:38 AM
huynq1992 huynq1992 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by c-attack View Post
There isn’t a coolant temperature shutdown point (unless you program one into iCUE), but the CPU is the item you want to protect and the BIOS will take of that if you hit critical levels. Anyone in a tropical climate sits at 40C all year long and it is a common level for rendering. There shouldn’t be any wear issues for the cooler materials at 40C vs 30C.
Thank you. My only worry is that the coolant will leak if the temperature in the cpu is too high. That may damage parts such as cpu, Graphics Cards or mainboard. So if the coolant temperature is around 40C, I don't have to worry about that problem
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