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Old 12-07-2004, 10:35 AM
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Default Jack Flash F.A.Q.

Issue:
I have a Corsair Flash Drive and I was trying to use it with Windows 98 SE and there is no driver available. Ram Guy Stated that my drive does not support Win9X or I tried the drivers listed and it still does not work in Windows 98 SE.

Resolution:
Microsoft dropped support of Win9x some time ago now and there is little we can do however you can try for updated drivers from www.usbman.com or from another unofficial driver like NUSB33D.exe. Please note this is not an official driver but it has worked for other users.

Issue:
I am copying files to my digital media and receive an error message stating I am out of memory. The total size of all files is less than the capacity of the media card.

Resolution:
The limit for the root of a FAT formatted device is 255 entries. Create a folder and then the files can be copied into the folder.


Issue:
Media is not recognized.

Resolution:
• Make sure the media is inserted properly.
• Try rebooting the system with the media already inserted.
• Try another media card.
• Make sure the media contacts are clean of any dirt/dust


Issue:
Formatting

Resolution:
You should NOT format the Flash card if your digital device does not support any Windows / Mac standard OS File Tables or if your Flash card requires an ID string to be recognized by the OEM device (industry formatted card). Please consult your OEM device manufacturer for details to the use of the Flash media card.
Media is high level pre-formatted prior to shipment; however, if for any reason you need to high level format your media card, follow the procedure outlined below:
1. Double click on the "My Computer" icon.
2. Right click on the drive letter associated with your ******** Media Reader.

NOTE: BE SURE TO SELECT THE CORRECT ICON!
The icon for the Media Reader will indicate it is a removable device (e.g. Removable Disk (E:)). Be sure not to inadvertently format the wrong device.
3. Select Format and follow the instructions displayed on screen to format the media.
Formatting Note for Windows XP users: The format utility used for removable flash cards 64 MB or above is set by default to use the FAT32 file system. Most cameras and portable devices will not accept media that has been formatted to the FAT32 file system.

Digital cameras may present one of the following errors:
1. Error message asking to re-format the flash card.
2. Error message that the flash card is not formatted.
3. Error message indicating that the card is anomalous.
There is a pop-up list in the Windows XP formatting utility that allows you to change from FAT32 to the FAT16 file system.

Some cameras may still have problems, if so then the card may need to be re-formatted by the digital camera itself. Be sure to isolate the camera from the computer when formatting the media.



Corsair offers 4GB CompactFlash cards to meet the expectations of professional and advanced amateur photographers. These high-capacity, high-speed CompactFlash cards are ideal for today’s high-megapixel, fast-shooting digital cameras.


Question:
Do all cameras recognize the Corsair 4GB CF card?

Answer:
No. Camera or device manufacturers must design their product with specific controllers capable of detecting and using the large 4GB Compact Flash memory products. To use Flash cards larger than 2GB, the device must support the FAT32 file system. New products supporting large capacity Flash products and with FAT32 support are making their way into the marketplace.


Question:
What is the FAT32 file system?

Answer:
The FAT32 file system is the successor to the FAT (File Allocation Table) file system, which has been used on PCs for many years. The FAT file system can only address up to 2GB; FAT32 can go beyond 2GB.

Question:
How are Corsair’s Flash cards formatted?

Answer:
FAT format is used for all Corsair Flash products up to 2GB capacity. Using the FAT format ensures that the Flash media are fully compatible with digital cameras and other devices. Corsair Flash products in capacities above 4GB (such as the CMFCF40-4GB) are formatted in the FAT32 file system. This allows cameras and devices to recognize the larger capacity.

Question:
Which devices support 4GB or larger Corsair Compact Flash cards?

Answer:
Newer cameras and devices that are capable of utilizing a FAT32 file system will be able to use Corsair’s 4GB Compact Flash products.

Question:
Can I modify or update my camera or device with drivers to allow it to recognize FAT32 file system and 4GB Corsair Compact Flash?

Answer:
No. The factory setting is not upgradeable. The deices are limited to the hardware settings as they ship from the manufacturer. Good News! More and more new devices enter the market with support for FAT32 file system and 4GB capacity Compact Flash.

Question:
How do I determine if my camera or device supports 4GB Compact Flash cards?

Answer:
Digital camera documentation, manuals and product boxes will generally indicate whether 4GB or larger Compact Flash cards are supported. Our Flash Memory configurator (coming soon) will provide a list of cameras and which Corsair Flash Memory is designed to work with it.

Question:
After inserting my 4GB Corsair Compact Flash into my camera, I notice it is only recognized as 2GB. Why?

Answer:
Your camera does not properly support the FAT32 file system. Reformatting the Compact Flash card will not resolve the issue as it is a limitation of the camera and its controller. Your camera only supports Compact Flash media up to 2GB in capacity. Corsair’s 2GB Compact Flash, CMFCF40-2GB, will work in your camera.

Question:
After inserting my 4GB Corsair Compact Flash into my camera, I notice it is only recognized as 2GB. Why?

Answer:
Your camera does not properly support the FAT32 file system. Reformatting the Compact Flash card will not resolve the issue as it is a limitation of the camera and its controller. Your camera only supports Compact Flash media up to 2GB in capacity. Corsair’s 2GB Compact Flash, CMFCF40-2GB, will work in your camera.

Question:
If my camera identifies a 4GB Compact Flash as 2GB, this is a result of the camera only supporting FAT and not FAT32?

Answer:
Yes.

Question:
After reformatting my 4GB Compact Flash card in my camera it still only identities as 2GB. Is that expected or “normal”?

Answer:
Yes. Your camera supports FAT file system but not FAT32 file system. Reformatting the 4GB Compact Flash card from FAT32 (as it ships) to FAT does not increase your cameras capabilities to read larger (4GB) media. The camera will only ever be able to identify a maximum of 2GB.

Question:
I have used my computer to format my 4GB Corsair Compact Flash card. The computer only identifies the Compact Flash card as 2GB. What happened?

Answer:
Formatting a 4GB FAT32 based Compact Flash card on any device that only supports FAT will set up the Compact Flash card using a FAT file structure. A FAT formatted card will only be identified as 2GB of storage because that is the maximum allowed in the FAT file system. In order to read the 4GB Compact Flash card on your computer at its full capacity of 4GB, reformat the Compact Flash card with the FAT32 file system in the format window.

Question:
Why is memory important to digital cameras?

Answer:
The need to save larger files on flash media has increased as both picture quality and resolutions of digital cameras have improved. Many early models of digital cameras relied upon built in, non-expandable memory for storing pictures. Reaching the limit of the built in memory on these cameras happened quickly, forcing users to download pictures frequently or to erase stored pictures before taking new pictures. This may be very inconvenient for users who are traveling or do not have readily available access to a computer.
New products from leading digital camera manufacturers typically feature removable flash media for capturing, storing and transporting images. Some of the popular media formats are Compact Flash (CF), Secure Digital (SD), Memory Stick (MS) and Multimedia Card (MMC). Corsair currently offers removable storage media in Compact Flash and Secure Digital formats. Camera manufacturers typically include small capacity storage media with new cameras to allow for immediate use after purchase. The included flash media, due to its small capacity, does not allow for many images to be taken/saved or for larger resolution and higher quality images to be taken. Users of digital cameras often find that larger capacity media is useful while traveling, at weddings, sporting events or other events where multiple pictures may be taken.


Question:
Is the performance of my flash media important?

Answer:
Yes!
Most of the flash media technology in use today was developed before the digital cameras, which require large files to be stored or accessed quickly, came to market. In fact, most of the original applications for flash media were for data access where READ performance was far more important that WRITE performance. As digital camera applications, camera resolutions, camera performance and picture files sized continue to grow, WRITE performance of flash media becomes a critical performance issue. Flash media with faster data WRITE performance can significantly reduce the time required to save a digital picture. The faster the media writes your picture to the media, the quicker you can take the next picture and avoid saving important moments. Corsair Flash Media, Compact Flash (CF) and Secure Digital (SD), are tested to perform at a 40x performance speed. This allows the CF or SD media to read at 6MB/s and write at 5MB/s sustained transfer speeds.


Question:
How many images or songs can be stored on flash media?

Answer:
Most of the flash media technology in use today was developed before the digital cameras, which require large files to be stored or accessed quickly, came to market. In fact, most of the original applications for flash media were for data access where READ performance was far more important that WRITE performance. As digital camera applications, camera resolutions, camera performance and picture files sized continue to grow, WRITE performance of flash media becomes a critical performance issue. Flash media with faster data WRITE performance can significantly reduce the time required to save a digital picture. The faster the media writes your picture to the media, the quicker you can take the next picture and avoid saving important moments. Corsair Flash Media, Compact Flash (CF) and Secure Digital (SD), are tested to perform at a 40x performance speed. This allows the CF or SD media to read at 6MB/s and write at 5MB/s sustained transfer speeds.

Question:
My Corsair Flash Voyager USB 2.0 Flash Drive doesn’t seem to be working as fast as I thought it might.

Answer:
The read/write performance of your Corsair Flash Voyager USB 2.0 Flash Drive depends on the configuration of your computer, its processor, memory and USB interface. NOTE: If you are running Windows 2000 or Windows XP and your computer has a Hi-Speed USB 2.0 port, it is advised that you install the Windows Service Pack. Please refer to the Microsoft Knowledge Base Website: http://support.microsoft.com/default...b;en-us;312370

Question:
When I connect my Corsair Flash Voyager USB 2.0 Flash Drive to my computer’s USB port, Windows prompts me for a Generic USB Hub Driver. What should I do?

Answer:
Direct Windows to the USB Host Driver location:
C:\Windows\System32\Drivers

Or if you are using Windows Vista:
There seems to be a common issue with Vista!
This seems to work as well, assuming you have all of the latest drivers and updates installed..
Go to Local Disk (C), got to Windows, got to System32, go to Driverstore, go to Filerepository, go to usbstor.inf ( click the on that is newest), cop ythe usbstor.inf and usbstor.PNF files. After you have copied the two files got to Windows, inf folder and paste the files in that folder. Now your usb devices (flash drives, hard drives, ipods, etc.) should work.


Question:
What does the blue LED on the Corsair Flash Voyager USB 2.0 Flash Drive indicate when it is blinking?

Answer:
When the blue LED on your Corsair Flash Voyager USB 2.0 Flash Drive is blinking, it means your drive is being accessed by the computer and files are being read or written to the drive. Do not unplug or remove the Corsair Flash Voyager USB 2.0 Flash Drive if the read/write LED is on or blinking. Wait for the LED to turn off before you safely remove the drive.

Question:
I will be traveling during the holidays and will be taking my digital camera and Corsair Flash Memory with me. Will my Corsair Flash Memory lose images after passing through the airport baggage X-ray scanner?


Answer:
Recent tests found no evidence of X-ray scanner damage to digital camera media cards or to the images they hold. The tests of scanner models currently in use in the U.S. transportation industry were jointly conducted by the International Imaging Industry Association (I3A), the leading global association for the imaging industry; ******** Corporation, a manufacturer of digital media cards; and the U.S. Transportation Security Administration (TSA). See 12/15/04 press release and International Imaging Industry Association (I3A) website.

Question:
Why Does My Flash Voyager show less volume than what it's sold as?

Answer:
This discrepancy comes from a few different places. First of all the industry-standard definition of a megabyte (MByte) for flash devices is one million (1,000,000) bytes, where the operating system uses two to the twentieth power, or 1,048,576 bytes. Similarly, for a gigabyte (GByte), the number is 1,000,000,000 and 1,073,741,824 respectively.

Second, as with disk drives, on flash devices there is small amount of overhead involved with formatting the device. The combination of these two factors causes the operating system to report the slightly reduced number of available bytes on the system.

This behavior is characteristic of all flash storage devices from all manufacturers. It is not a characteristic of Corsair devices only.

Question:
When I insert my Flash Voyager in my system it reports that it is not formatted and ask's me to format it and when I do it then tells me its write protected. How can I format my Flash Voyager?

Answer:
Some have had this issue and the work around in this post may solve that, if not or if the problem persists then let's get it replaced, please use the On Line RMA Request and we will be happy to replace it

Question:
When I insert my Flash Voyager in my system with Windows Vista I get an error message that states "Hardware ID Missing"?
Is my Drive failing?

Answer:
No most likely its issue with the O.S. Please make sure you have all of the latest BIOS and drives installed and all updates from Microsoft. If the problem persists please see this Knowledge Base Article # 936003 or There is a patch available from Microsoft as well.


Question:
When I insert my Flash Voyager in my system with Windows Vista it will ask for for the driver, but there was no driver for Windows Vista on the CD or the flash drive, where can I get the driver for my Flash Voyager?

Answer:
If you are having this problem, it appears that its happening with other flash drives as well
Which you can see from this link:

Note that Windows Vista does not require any drivers for any of our Flash Drives.

1. Insert drive and wait for about 20 seconds to see if the driver installation is slow.

2. During device driver search, point to a location Windows\System32\DriverStore\FileRepository and enable “Include subfolders” in the Browse window.

If this fails, point to one of the subfolders within FileRepository:

FileRepository\usbstor.inf_…

FileRepository\disk.inf_…

FileRepository\volume.inf_…

FileRepository\wpdfs.inf_…

3. If FileRepository location(s) doesn’t work, point to location Windows\System32\Spool\Drivers and enable “Include subfolders” in the Browse window.

4. Check Device Manager for incorrectly installed drivers for the Flash Voyager; uninstall them and reinsert the drive.

Last edited by RAM GUY; 05-06-2011 at 04:44 PM.
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