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  #16  
Old 07-06-2018, 09:38 PM
Lady Fitzgerald Lady Fitzgerald is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by c-attack View Post
Indeed. Right on the side. 25A/25A/63A. Large current limits. But how will you route the power from the socket to your circuit and devices? Now we are back to the current capacity of the standardized cable. The cable is the limiting factor. You missed the point straight from the start.
Why can't I get a straight answer? I feel like I'm talking to an Amazon bot. Forget the blasted cable and answer the bloody question I asked, which is what is the OCP (Over-Current Protection) at each socket?
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  #17  
Old 07-11-2018, 12:01 AM
Lady Fitzgerald Lady Fitzgerald is offline
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302 reads and not one person can answer a simple question?
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  #18  
Old 07-11-2018, 04:24 PM
rhildinger rhildinger is offline
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If you're in single-rail mode, there is no per-socket OCP, just the overall 63A (presumably) OCP of the single +12V rail. If you're in multiple-rail mode, the per-socket OCP rating seems to be something that Corsair is not publishing. An independent hardware test/review of the AX760 may give you that information, but for whatever reason Corsair has not published it in the PSU manual or specs.
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  #19  
Old 07-11-2018, 04:42 PM
rhildinger rhildinger is offline
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Actually, I see now that the AX760 does not support multiple rail operation, so that part of my previous post doesn't apply.

To answer the OP's original question, there is no per-socket OCP on the AX760. Like most single rail designs, it relies on the judgement of the system builder and the limited current carrying capacity of the cables to keep from drawing too many amps out of a single socket. Which is essentially what c-attack has been saying all along.

Yes, you can increase your wire current capacity by connecting the ports in parallel as long as you match the individual voltage rails. They are all connected together behind the socket wall, so it won't hurt to reconnect them in front of it.
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  #20  
Old 07-11-2018, 05:13 PM
Lady Fitzgerald Lady Fitzgerald is offline
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Originally Posted by rhildinger View Post
Actually, I see now that the AX760 does not support multiple rail operation, so that part of my previous post doesn't apply.

To answer the OP's original question, there is no per-socket OCP on the AX760. Like most single rail designs, it relies on the judgement of the system builder and the limited current carrying capacity of the cables to keep from drawing too many amps out of a single socket. Which is essentially what c-attack has been saying all along.

Yes, you can increase your wire current capacity by connecting the ports in parallel as long as you match the individual voltage rails. They are all connected together behind the socket wall, so it won't hurt to reconnect them in front of it.
Thank you very much! Making sure a cable can handle the current without excessive voltage drop is easy (bigger wires, such as #14). After all, the original wires going to each pin are only #18. Btw, the load plays the major role in determining how much current is drawn through a cable. The size of the size of the wires determine how much current can be safely passed through the cable and the size and length of the wires determine voltage drop.
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Last edited by Lady Fitzgerald; 07-11-2018 at 05:16 PM.
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  #21  
Old 07-11-2018, 06:09 PM
rhildinger rhildinger is offline
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Originally Posted by Lady Fitzgerald View Post
Btw, the load plays the major role in determining how much current is drawn through a cable. The size of the size of the wires determine how much current can be safely passed through the cable and the size and length of the wires determine voltage drop.
Yes, I'm aware that load is the primary determinant of current draw ;-)

I should have worded my original statement better. To wit: "Like most single rail designs, it relies on the judgement of the system builder and his or her knowledge of cabling current limits and estimated device current usage to keep from drawing too many amps out of a single socket."
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